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Rabbit in a mustard sauce

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

We have a fantastic rabbit with dried prunes and dark beer stew in my country, but this time I made this rabbit and mustard dish, something you would find more in France and even Spain.

It's not a stew but a braise. The difference is that a braise uses much less liquid, this also means that your pan or pot has to be quite large to arrange the pieces side by side, never on top of each other. So, in fact, braising is ideal for people who want to prepare just a few pieces, like only legs or so.

So the dish should be called braise rabbit in mustardsauce, braised Belgian endives and a vegetable mix of potato, turnip and carrot.

 

Vegetables (potato/turnip/carrot mix); start with the veggies, they have to cool anyway to proceed and... please DO save the cooking water, we will use that as a light vegetable stock! Cut potato, turnip and carrots in the shapes you want. Put in salted not too hard boiling water for 20 minutes, depending on the size of your chunks.

Keep some of the cooking water that now tastes like a light veggie stock and let put the veggies aside to cool entirely.

 

Belgian endives; this is my favorite way of preparing them. Simply fry them shortly in butter, on their whole, in a cooking pot, in which they fit side by side, not stacked. Season well with s&p and nutmeg. Pour in some plain water (approx. 1 finger high). Make a "cartouche" or in plain words, tear or cut a piece of parchement paper and push straight on top of the endives. Best to make a small hole in the paper. Additional, put the pot's lid on, reduce the fire to low and let braise for 45-60 minutes. Turn the endives a few times but not to often. They should come out soft and caramelized like in the picture.

 

Rabbit; time to use your nice castiron pots! Fry the pieces in sunflower oil for quite a long time (15 minutes-ish) on medium high fire. Season well with s&p. Remove the meat. Now put in some chopped shallots and garlic to taste and let fry. Add a small tbsp of plain flour and let fry a bit. Add a good dash of white wine, stir well and let cook until the alcohol is complete gone (you notice when the smell changes). Put the meat back in and immediately add a 2 fingers high amount of the cooking water of the veggies, stir well. Reduce the fire to low and let braise for 90 minutes or until nicely done. Turn the pieces only a few times if necessary.

Remove the meat, add a small dash of cream, add a tbsp of plain Dijon mustard ànd as much grainy mustard as you wish. Add chopped parcely.

 

Fry the potato/turnip/carrot mix in a little sunflower oil. Serve.

(click image to enlarge)

KonijnMosterd.jpg

post #2 of 29

This is a beautiful dish, can I come over for dinner?  What do you call this dish?  I love the braised endives.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 29

I've had rabbit before but never in this kind of mustard sauche, it looks delicious though. The braised endives look like they go great with it.

post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

This is a beautiful dish, can I come over for dinner?  What do you call this dish?  I love the braised endives.



Thanks KK. I would call the dish simply "Rabbit in mustardsauce with braised Belgian endives". These endives are indeed so nice and you can do a lot of things with it. But braising them for a very long time brings the sweetness out, which combines so well with the remaining bitter taste. It's easy to make, I hope a lot of people try it.

 

post #5 of 29

frown.gif  Oh No!   I raise (angora) rabbits.  I cannot imagine putting Fluffy in the Dutch oven.  I've had hundreds of rabbits come through here and I have still never tasted domestic rabbit.  When I was a kid, my uncles killed wild rabbit and remember my mother hated cleaning them because the buckshot drove fur into the meat.   I guess I tasted it then, but I don't remember it.

 

I'm not opposed to eating them.  I gave my culls to a local Christian homeless shelter, and they did the deed humanely.  It helped contribute to the resident's protein intake and maybe saved the shelter some $$.   I just don't want to raise a rabbit to trust me, and then betray it's trust like that.  (angoras have to be groomed, so they have to be trained from the litterbox to be handled a lot).     I always gave them young ones, by the time they were 3 mo. old, it was obvious which ones were going to be good woolers.    

 

I've considered getting silky (flightless) chickens.  They would eat the bugs out of the rabbit droppings, and prevent disease in the summer.   But they are kind of small.   I think I could "do the deed" on those. And I get a LOT of mileage out of a bird.

post #6 of 29

That looks very good

post #7 of 29

That's kind of ironic, IndyGal. We're on the other end, looking right now into raising meat rabbits.

 

Why? Well, have you seen the retail prices? Around here they get $5-8/lb. And that's for frozen rabbits.

 

Near as I can determine, so far, there's nobody raising them either in my country or in surrounding counties. So there's likely a market for them.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 29

 

In Madrid, fresh cleaned rabbit is 5 or 6 Euros a kilo ... Usually served with garlic sauteed in olive oil and white wine with herbs and spices. I cannot personally  however, though most recipes that work with chicken breasts or quail shall work with rabbit. It is cheaper than chicken and many say, it is a clean white meat as rabbits are vegetarians. Hares on the other hand, are carniverous and have a dark dark meat, used alot in stews here in Madrid.  

post #9 of 29

As mentioned, in Madrid, Spain rabbits cleaned and fresh are sold throughout the city for 5 to 6 Euros a kilo ... $1.66 USD is One Euro. They prepare in white wine, and saute in garlic with spices and herbs, similar to chicken ... Cheap in Kentucky ... Good business I believe since nobody else is doing it. Need to speak to the restaurateurs and hoteliers ... Good luck. Margcata

post #10 of 29

I've never heard that hares were carnivores, Margcata. American hares, such as Snowshoes, certainly aren't.

 

Be that as it may, rabbit and chicken recipes are interchangeable. Taste and texture won't always be the same, of course, especially since rabbit is firmer fleshed. But any recipe for one will work with the other.

 

Price, of course, is a matter of availability, demand, and popularity. Because rabbit is not as popular in America as it is in Europe, it's just not widely available. So prices are high.

 

Normally I don't mind paying a premium for a specialty food. But eight bucks a pound for what amounts to being chicken is a bit more than a premium. It's extortionate, IMO. Only thing worse is the price of goose in this country.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 29

Our posts must have crossed.

 

How do you figure 6 Euros to be cheap in Kentucky. That works out as US$3.98/pound, versus the $8.00/lb I just saw it being sold for. And that's not even for fresh! Who knows when those rabbits were killed and frozen?

 

Don't get me wrong. I love rabbit. I'm just not going to pay that kind of money for one, especially not when shotshells are about a dime each.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 29

 

I believe it should be between 4.50 and 6 Euros a kilo Fresh rabbit, not frozen from all Central Markets and Butchers in the hyper or large Supermkts. ... In Spain it is less than 5 or 6 Euros a kilo ... Re.check. Margcata from Madrid.

post #13 of 29

 

I have been told hares are carniverous as they are wild, and do go after smaller rodents. By no means am I an expert in this variety of game ... Just had been told during a conversation. Maybe this person was mistaken, however, he is a wkend hunter and sells some of his game to the Bars for tapas. However, it is not commonly an Urban meat ... It is a rural staple.

 

Yes, rabbit is more common in some European cities. It is sold fresh here in Madrid and the price is between 4.50 to 6 Euros a Kilo not pound. Very few things in Spain are sold via pound system ... Kilo is the preferred system.

 

I believe there has been a computer technological problem too ... There are more than one blogger online too. Sorry. Hope this clarifies the price in Spain.

 

 

post #14 of 29

1 euro = 1.3633 US dollars (as of Nov 20,2011)

 

1 euro/kilo * $1.3633/euro = $1.3633/kilo

 

$1.3633/kilo*1 kilo/2.2 pounds = $1.3633/2.2 pounds = $0.6197/pound

 

Euro/kilo USD/pound
1.00 $0.62
2.00 $1.24
3.00 $1.86
4.00 $2.48
5.00 $3.10
6.00 $3.72
7.00 $4.34
8.00 $4.96
9.00 $5.58
10.00 $6.20

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #15 of 29

 

Thanks for the Euro to Dollar currency rate exchange. I have been living in Europe since the 1990s and truly have forgotten that it was adjusted several years ago. It was originally 1.66 however, it had been lowered.  

post #16 of 29

The Euro fluctuates against EVERY other currency.

post #17 of 29

The point was simply that I used Margcata's provided exchange rate to establish a Spanish cost per pound. No, not that they sell by the pound in Spain, but to create a level playing field. The exact exchange rate is actually irrelevent to the discussion.

 

I took 6 Euros (she said 5-6) to make it as expensive as possible. Converted that to dollars (at 1.66 per). The result was that rabbit in Madrid, while expensive, is only about half what it was selling for here in Kentucky.

 

Another difference is that any rabbit sold in America is farm-raised. It is illegal to sell wild game here. In Europe things are different, and wild game is a staple of the markets.

 

And, before anyone jumps salty, this is not a conservation issue, merely a philosophical difference in how game ownership is percieved. In the U.S. game is seen as belonging to the people as a whole, and therefore subject to government control. Market hunting has been illegal since the early part of the 20th century.

 

 In Europe, game is seen as belonging to the landowner, who can dispose of it however he feels like---including selling it.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by MARGCATA View Post

 

Thanks for the Euro to Dollar currency rate exchange. I have been living in Europe since the 1990s and truly have forgotten that it was adjusted several years ago. It was originally 1.66 however, it had been lowered.  


This..

 

post #19 of 29

THANK YOU! Thank you, ChrisBelgium!

We raise rabbits for meat and are always looking for new ways to serve this delicious low fat food.

I have cooked chickens in various mustard concoctions for years,   but haven't really done it with rabbit before.

I dunno why not.

Your plate looks great!

 

And @ IndyGal: rabbits are MUCH easier to clean than chickens.

My next project is learning to preserve the hides....

 

We never  name our chickens or our rabbits. They aren't pets.

post #20 of 29

Where are you located, Neptune?

 

Curing the hides, btw, isn't difficult. Just time consuming, depending on the method you choose to use.

 

For low volume (not to mention environmental concerns), alum curing is probably your best bet.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #21 of 29

Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Curing the hides, btw, isn't difficult. Just time consuming, depending on the method you choose to use.  For low volume (not to mention environmental concerns), alum curing is probably your best bet.


Have your women scrape the skins clean with a shell, then chew them until they are supple. 

 

BDL

 

post #22 of 29

Classic "lapin a la moutarde", very common in French cuisine, delicious, I love the braised endives (endives braisées) also a French classic...never cooked them myself, usually do endives gratiné wrapped in ham with an emmental bechamel but definitely going to try you way... look yum.

 

Havn't got either of these on my site yet but sure gonna smile.gif nice presentation, looks a very comforting and cozy dish.

post #23 of 29

I hope, BDL, that comment was tongue in cheek. wink.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by siloway View Post

Classic "lapin a la moutarde", very common in French cuisine, delicious, I love the braised endives (endives braisées) also a French classic...never cooked them myself, usually do endives gratiné wrapped in ham with an emmental bechamel but definitely going to try you way... look yum.

 

Havn't got either of these on my site yet but sure gonna smile.gif nice presentation, looks a very comforting and cozy dish.


Thanks Siloway. A propos, I made "chicons au gratin" a few days ago and took some pictures, in 2 versions; one classic with ham and another with smoked salmon. I'll post them in a short while.  A little info for any other reader; chicons=endives.
 

 

post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 

Neptune, thanks. Eating rabbit is very common in many parts of Europe. Rabbits are even bred on large scale for consumption. (BTW, sorry Indygal but I do understand your objection).

I made another experiment past week, a more modern version of the classic rabbit with prunes. Just to show that you don't need to copy recipes with chicken when preparing rabbit.

How to call this recipe? I don't know, any of this forum's suggestions will do.

 

First, carefully take the meat off. Also, don't forget the very small filet at the bottom (other side of the bones)! You now have a roll of thicker meat on which the thin belly flap is attached. Perfect for rolling a stuffing inside. Use your imagination for the stuffing, there are so many possibilities. Here I used Californian(!) dried prunes. I soaked them first to tenderize, then chopped them roughly. That's the stuffing, simple and easy. Fill the meat, roll and tie with a piece of butcher's twine.

Put in the fridge for the time being.

 

Best to start with a sauce base. Chop the remaining bones in small pieces and fry on medium high fire during 30 minutes or so in butter and/or oil untill well browned. Add aromates like shallot, carrot, garlic... and let fry. Now deglaze with 1/2 cup of Créme de Cassis (french sweet drink made from black currants). You could replace this alcohol with portwine or whatever sweeter alcohol you like but créme de cassis is the waaaw factor in this dish. Let nearly all alcohol evaporate untill it turns syrupy, then add a good cup of stock (veal, chicken,...). Let simmer as long as you can. When nicely reduced, sieve, warm through and "walz" some cold chunks of good butter in the saucepan, just before serving, this will thicken the sauce and make it glossy at the same time.

Panfry the meat on medium high untill nicely browned on all sides, cover loosely with aluminiumfoil and reduce the fire. Let cook for another 10-15 minutes at low fire, turn the meat a few times. Then remove the meat from the pan and wrap into the aluminiumsheet to rest, at least untill the sauce is done. Deglaze the pan with the sauce you already made, before you add the cold butter!!!). Done.

 

I served this with homemade potato gnocchi and a "couscous" of cauliflower.

- cauliflower; shave small couscous grain-ish parts from the cauliflower with a sharp knife. Blanche in boiling water with a tbsp of white vinegar for 10-15 seconds, remove and let cool. Warm a little butter, add a chopped shallot and let sweat, then add the cauliflower, s&p, nutmeg, maybe another drop of vinegar if necesary to correct the balance.

- potato gnocchi; 600-800 grams of freshly mashed potato, still hot! An egg, approx. 30% plain flour, more if necessary. Work as shortly as possible into a dough, the potatoes have to be still warm! Cut shunks and roll into sausages, cut them into gnocchi. They need to be boiled in water... asap. As soon as they come to the surface of the boiling water, remove and put in icecold water. Remove. They are now ready to fry in a little butter (or to put left-overs in your freezer).

Enjoy!

(Click images to enlarge)

konijnenrug1.jpg konijnenrug2.jpg

 

konijnenrugGnocchi1.jpg konijnenrugGnocchi2.jpg

 

post #26 of 29

Too funny!!

 

BTW, I'm in Florida.

Alum is hard to find, but thats the method I'll use when I finally get some.

post #27 of 29

Alum is aluminum sulfate, Neptune. It should be available at farm supply places. If not, most chemical supply houses can get it for you. Comes in 50- and 100-pound bags.

 

The big market for rabbit hides is hair-on. So make sure you understand the differences in procedure between hair-on and hair-off curing. They're not radical differences; more in the manner of nuances. But they are important if you want to assure that the hair doesn't slip.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #28 of 29

Last Saturday, Chris made the rabbit in mustard sauce with turnips and carrots because it was her turn to cook.

My compliments for the recipe! thumb.gif

The turnips and carrots and potatoes were delicious too- we've never prepared them exactly like that.

Endive wasn't available, but we had a garden salad made with arugula, romaine, tomato and avocado-all fresh from the garden.

(as was the rabbit)

The slight bitterness of the arugula plays very well with the buttery avocado.                                                                                                                                                                                            

Our Our local Publix supermarket has frozen domestically grown 1/2 rabbits for $12.99.  OUCH!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       The The latino market sells whole frozen Chinese rabbits for about $12.00. (thats pretty expensive). Here, rabbit is considered exotic, I guess.

With a bit of searching you can probably find a local breeder who will sell you a fresh dressed rabbit at a better price, though.


Edited by NEPTUNE - 12/22/11 at 4:44am
post #29 of 29

(sent to KY Heirloomer privately on second though)

 


 

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