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Elegant Pork Butt dinner? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Thread Starter 

Ok ok I think I get it.  The butcher deboned it for me, but I didn't let him butterfly.  I'll do it on my own trying one of these ways, whichever way the pork likes most.

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post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I used cippolini onions and they came out good.  I think it was the lemons for sure.  I may have to supreme the lemons next time and avoid the pith all together.


You could, but that won't give you the desired result (at least the result desired by the author of the recipe), which is to have caramelized lemon quarters with peel and pith and all. Like I said, it shouldn't be a problem doing it, so don't change the recipe just because you had a bad lemon! A caramelized lemon quarter is really something beautiful and delicious. I don't think you can caramelize a lemon supreme really, and even if you could it wouldn't be the same. 

post #33 of 43
Thread Starter 

I don't want to make the same mistake again, none of the lemons seemed bad to me.

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post #34 of 43

One stuffing I like for pork roasts is sweated onions and bell peppers, sauteed mushrooms and some sausage.  Lately I've been using these maple - sage breakfast from a local sausage place, but if you are not fond of sage try a sweet italian.  There's a market here that makes a chicken basil sausage I really like, maybe I'll try that.  Getting cold here in Utah, maybe a stuffed pork roast would be just the thing this weekend.

 

mjb.

 

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

One stuffing I like for pork roasts is sweated onions and bell peppers, sauteed mushrooms and some sausage.  Lately I've been using these maple - sage breakfast from a local sausage place, but if you are not fond of sage try a sweet italian.  There's a market here that makes a chicken basil sausage I really like, maybe I'll try that.  Getting cold here in Utah, maybe a stuffed pork roast would be just the thing this weekend.

 

mjb.

 

 



That sounds like a good stuffing and breakfast sausage is my favorite kind of sausage minus the sage :)  Do you grind up and cook the sausage first?

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post #36 of 43

A little late to the party and not a recipe so much as a technique. I prefer a boneless shoulder for this as carving is much easier. Costco usually has boneless shoulder at a good price.

 

Tie and roast the pork butt slowly to 190 degrees internal, about 7 hours for a 8 pounder. I think it was a temp of about 250-300. Let it rest overnight in it's juices in the refrigerator. Carve the next day cold as it will fall apart if you try to carve it warm. Letting it rest,  chill down and reheating helps the texture and presentation for a more upscale handling of this cut. Also doing it ahead saves you hassle if you're doing this for guests or a special occasion.

 

This is something I picked up from Cook's Illustrated so if you have their back issues, you can get more details on how they did it. But just the info above is how I've been handling my pork shoulder roasts for serving as a whole roast.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #37 of 43
Thread Starter 

Phatch, it's too late for this round but pork shoulder is one of those things I'll be making over and over again so it's never too late really.  Your way sounds like how I make it for pulled pork, letting it cook low and slow for hours.  Sounds a bit fussy for a roast though, it would take forever and a half to cool completely before storing and cooling in the fridge, plus going through the hassle of warming it up after it's carved.  Honestly, if you give the method that French Fries suggested a chance you won't be disappointed in the outcome.  Tie it up and follow the instructions and not only is it tender, but holds together really well while still hot :)

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Tie and roast the pork butt slowly to 190 degrees internal, about 7 hours for a 8 pounder. I think it was a temp of about 250-300. Let it rest overnight in it's juices in the refrigerator. Carve the next day cold as it will fall apart if you try to carve it warm. Letting it rest,  chill down and reheating helps the texture and presentation for a more upscale handling of this cut. Also doing it ahead saves you hassle if you're doing this for guests or a special occasion.


Wow... I would personally never do that - goes to show you we all have different taste and techniques I guess. First of all I would NEVER serve re-heated pork butt to my guests. It doesn't taste anywhere near as good as a pork butt you just cooked. I, personally, find that there's a HUGE difference in taste. Second, 190 F internal is WAAAAY too much for a roast I'm going to carve. That's pulled pork temps, not roast temps. I prefer my pork butt way less cooked, probably closer to 145-150 F. 

 

post #39 of 43
Thread Starter 

Cuts like this do very well if not better when reheated.  That's why it's possible to do braises a day ahead.

 

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post #40 of 43

It's certainly a different approach for a shoulder roast. Comes out quite nicely though.

 

I shoot for 140 in my pork loin and tenderloin roast.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Cuts like this do very well if not better when reheated.  That's why it's possible to do braises a day ahead.

 



In a braise, yes. As a roast, no. I hate the taste of re-heated pork roast, even if it's from the shoulder. It's got a special taste, like a new taste, that wasn't there the first day you roasted it. It really kills the whole dish IMO. 

post #42 of 43

Never "defat." Fat equals flavor, and if you want to make gravy or pan sauce, you will only have to replace the fat with another kind of fat that does not taste like or compliment the meat. 

post #43 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornelius View Post

Never "defat." Fat equals flavor, and if you want to make gravy or pan sauce, you will only have to replace the fat with another kind of fat that does not taste like or compliment the meat. 



I don't agree, fat is not always pleasant and when making something like roasted lamb there is often too much fat.  It's not such a problem when making gravy because the thickening agent combines well with the fat.  But when making jus I don't like to see puddles of grease on my plate.

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