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Mac Originals opinions.

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

There is a lot of love for the Mac pros but I can't find much on the original Mac series. Search mac and find a lot of mac and cheese advice.

 

How do they rank against the other Macs for edge holding corrosion resistance etc.

 

Found at the swap meet 4 Mac originals, 2 of the 6 3/4 utility knives, a petty, and a fillet knife that were beat to hell but far beyond cheap. Never too early to look for cooking Xmas gifts ya know. :)

 

The utilities and petty had uneven edges from pull through sharpeners and the fillet had a big rust pit, about 1/32” in, on the edge that needed a lot of work to get below, and the petty tip is slightly bent.

 

Still need some more TLC but wondering the consensus on these in the grand J knife scheme.

 

Jim

post #2 of 8

Decent, entry level, Japanese knives.  Get and stay sharper than the Euro and American knives that were prevalent when the MACs first came out, lighter, and more agile than any of the German profiles.  Comfortable handles, indifferent F&F, fairly flexible blade, and not easy to sharpen.  

 

To name only two of several, Tojiro DP and Fujiwara FKM are probably better overall, entry-level, Japanese knives for similar money.  But, as always, it depends which properties you value most, and whether a particular knife is a particularly bad or good fit for you. 

 

The entry-level, Japanese knife market is very competitive market, and the overvalued yen hasn't made it easier to handicap. 

 

BDL

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks BDL. The guy was selling all 4 of them for $5 so I couldn't pass that up. :) They are quite resistant in sharpening compared to German steel but are coming along.

 

Once done I'll cut up some product and decide how they fit me.

 

Jim

post #4 of 8

You got a great price on good knives.  An absurdly great price.  If they're "coming along" with the sharpening, I'd say you scored big time.

post #5 of 8

Some people look at the price...me, I have a clock in my head.  How long will it take me to fix that knife.  Your time has a value, for sure.  I can say "it's my hobby time" but I work FT and go to school FT, so my hobby time suffers if I let work creep into it.  If it's really a labor of love and you're up to the task, you got a great deal.


Me, I have a problem with making promises based on good intentions but finding myself pressed to deliver on them.  I always keep my word; that makes my over-promising even worse!lol.gif

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post

Some people look at the price...me, I have a clock in my head.  How long will it take me to fix that knife.  Your time has a value, for sure.  I can say "it's my hobby time" but I work FT and go to school FT, so my hobby time suffers if I let work creep into it.  If it's really a labor of love and you're up to the task, you got a great deal.

Me, I have a problem with making promises based on good intentions but finding myself pressed to deliver on them.  I always keep my word; that makes my over-promising even worse!lol.gif



I know time wise they took far more time than I would prefer but sometimes I take stuff on just for the challenge. :)

 

A neighbor brought me a jacked to hell Chinese cleaver. It was rusted and had serious dings all over the blade. I was amazed she used it and a similar style is in the asian markets for $15. This was given to her by her mom when she left Vietnam many years ago. Can't replace an heirloom so cleaned the rust and sharpened it back up and got a big pot of curry soup for my efforts.

 

Fair enough trade. :)

 

Jim

post #7 of 8

The difficulty in sharpening the entry level MACs comes from a tendency to chatter on the stones, not because the blade alloy is difficult (it isn't).  Once you understand the problem, you should get the hang of keeping the edge flat on the stone by the second knife at most. 

 

Use a little extra, very consistent pressure, with both hands on the blade.  Start slower than normal until you're satisfied the blade isn't chattering and you have the right angle; then speed up until you're sharpening almost as quickly as you can and still hold angle and pressure.  Most people sharpen too slowly.  You're rubbing a knife on a rock, not performing ocular surgery; and a good, quick rhythm will actually make your angles and pressures more consistent.

 

Unless its badly chipped, a MAC Original or Chef series knife shouldn't take longer than twenty minutes at most.  If it does, there's a technical problem.  Most likely you're trying to sharpen at too acute an angle; and/or you're "counting strokes" and using way too many (common); and/or you're using too many stones.

 

Everything else being equal, if you don't have to profile or repair, you should be able to create a wonderful, practical edge on two water stones.  Of course, you're going to want to start a "new to you" used knife on a coarse stone; but unless the knife needs a lot of work to flatten the bevels, any given blade shouldn't take more than twenty minutes at most.  Don't try putting much polish on them, entry-level MACs don't have the scratch hardness to hold it.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/24/11 at 8:57pm
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post


 

Everything else being equal, if you don't have to profile or repair, you should be able to create a wonderful, practical edge on two water stones.  Of course, you're going to want to start a "new to you" used knife on a coarse stone; but unless the knife needs a lot of work to flatten the bevels, any given blade shouldn't take more than twenty minutes at most.  Don't try putting much polish on them, entry-level MACs don't have the scratch hardness to hold it.

 

BDL


Thanks BDL. They were in really bad shape. The fillet had rust that ate a "chip" about 1/64th into the blade and all had been run through pull through sharpeners that left the geometry out of whack. the petty for example had a swale so there was about 1" that never made contact on the board. All had some degree of that so reshape the geometry, new bevels, and resharpening took some serious time with the belt sander 120 and 400 grit to reshape and rough sharpen them

 

Due to the handle shape leaving 1" or so of edge sticking out of the block I may not keep them.

 

Took the 4 Macs and 2 other knives to a super polish, 1000, 6000 grit Kings and leather wheel with coupound before you responded, and plan on getting some 200X micrographs to show the effect of a steel on an edge.

 

Jim

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