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what does one do with lamb backs?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

just saw these in the store the other day...costillar de cordero @ $2/lb.....how do these get cooked?  as in a menudo or something?...thanks

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 5

Costillar de cordero is rack -- not back -- of lamb.  It's not only an important thing for a cook to know, but it makes a difference when giving a massage. 

 

I've seen Mexican cooks mostly use (pork, goat, or lamb) spines for stews, especially moles, especially yellow moles.

 

BDL

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

thanks for the translation chef....maybe i wrote the name down incorrectly...i couldn't see through the package but upon feeling(massaging?), it felt pretty soft, but with small bones....at $2 bucks a lb, it never crossed my mind that it was a rack...it definately felt backboney...was just curious how much was fat and how much was meat....guess next time i'm in the store, i'll ask someone......i don't think i've heard of yellow mole...please enlighten....and again,thanks..

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #4 of 5

Durangojo,

 

Most Americans seem to think that mole Poblano is the one and only "authentic mole."  But as you know -- and they don't -- most "authentic" moles don't contain chocolate, let alone sweet, "drinking" chocolate.  Moles are almost always long cooked, complex, thickened concoctions blended from reconstituted, dried chillies and huge numbers of other things.   Although made with lots of chillies, they usually aren't terribly "hot" in the piquant sense of the word.  That goes double for the Oaxacan moles, and as a general rule Oaxacan food seldom is very hot.  

 

Mole negro and its derivative, mole Poblano are the only two I can think of which do have chocolate. Some American chefs are notable for producing quick, chocolate-based moles on Television, particularly Rick Bayless.  Those quickies aren't what you'd call "authentic," and Bayless, who's a genius, would be the first to say so.

 

Mole amarillo (yellow mole) is one of the "seven moles of Oaxaca."  Not to be redundant, but it's one of those complicated, complex, long cooked things and gets its color from pumpkin seeds and yellow chiles.  Most other Oaxacan moles are thickened with bread, but mole amarillo is more often thickened with masa.

 

Compared to most of the others, amarillo is happier with strong flavored red meats like beef, goat and lamb.  I brought up "spine," because you don't often see an entire back of an animal the size of a lamb on a menu; and because pig, goat, or lamb spine are relatively common proteins in "typical" dishes, which if they aren't the food of poverty are not the foods of wealth either. 

 

My favorite mole is mole coloradito.  What's yours?  I'd guess either mole negro or mole verde. Wotthehell, wotthehell, we can like them all.

 

Whatever was in the package at your carneceria, "costilla" is Spanish for "rib," and a "costillar" is a rack of ribs.  Spine is called, "espina," and "espinaza."  Back is usually "falda," sometimes "dorso," and less often "lomo."  But "lomo" is more often "loin" when it comes to food; and "dorso" isn't that common either.
 

Hope this makes sense,

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/23/11 at 7:13am
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

bdl,

when i opened a rick bayless cookbook it strangely fell open to 'mole amarrillo con pollo con ejotes y chayote'.....so now i know....i've never made this version and it seems to be a fast, simple recipe that may be useful sometime when i need/want a fast simple mole.. i don't think i have tasted all the classic seven, but off the bat i like the mole negro the best...i like it's blackness, it's incredible richness, complexity and nuances...every mouthful is a discovery...another level.....so many levels. and it is certainly a labor of love to make! mole, like cilantro is not for everyone as you know...people either love it or hate it, which is too bad. i use rick's recipe from his mexican kitchen book....takes all day, but well worth it...as for the lamb back...i'm pretty sure it was a mislabel....carneceria, here? that's rich....we are a whitebread ski town! thanks for all the info and spanish lessons

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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