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CHEESE FONDUE BONNEVAL SUR ARC, SAVOY

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

 

This cheese fondue recipe hails from Restaurant Le Pre Catin in Bonneval Sur Arc, Savoy, France ... Fondue is wonderfully social, as it provides a sharing and interexchanging bond and for  a special occasion, cheeseaholics and / or vegetarians who eat cheese can fully participate ... Serve a green salad afterwards and a shot of Kirsch clear cherry liquor ... Enjoy ... Margcata.

 

6 SERVINGS ...

 

9 ounces of Beaufort cheese or Emmenthal grated

9 ounces of Comté or Gruyère cheese grated ( original Swiss - Lake Geneva area recipe uses Guyère )

2 tblsps of all purpose flour 

1 1/2 cups of dry white wine ( Le Pre Catin used Chignin Bergeron White Wine )

1 tblsp Kirsch ( Clear Cherry Brandy )

Pinch of Nutmeg

Salt and Grinded Black Pepper to taste

2 large French baguettes cut into cubes 1/4 inch each

 

1) toss cheeses with flour in a large bowl

2) Bring wine to simmer in a fondue pot or large sauce pan over medium heat

3) add a handful of grated cheese and whisk until melted

4) Repeat with all the grated cheese until the mixture is totally smooth

5) Mix in the Kirsch Brandy and a hefty pinch of Nutmeg

6) Add salt and black pepper to taste

7) Whisk until bubbly 2 minutes or so

8) Set fondue pot over candle or heat

9) serve with bread cubes on skewers

10) to reduce fat content, serve with white wine Chigin Bergeron or a Fermented Chardonnay, a variety of apples, grapes and pears.

11) Serve a green sorrel and arugula salad to wash the palate and a snifter of Kirsch afterwards.

 

 

post #2 of 8

I love cheese fondue every now and then.

They don't use plain flour, but cornstarch, more known in France and Switserland as "Maizena".

Better to dissolve it in some Kirch (which is an "eau de vie", not a brandy) first and then add it to the cheese/wine mixture.

You forgot to rub the fondue pot with a clove of garlic, that would be very un-french.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

 

Re: Cheese Fondue Reply . Margcata - 24th

 

Firstly, Kirsch stems from  Kirschwasser which is from the black cherry Morello and it is a brandy.

 

Secondly, the recipe given to me from the Restaurant mentioned is a very small village and thus, they use all purpose flour not Maizena which is from corn flour. However, it was quite lovely and we all enjoyed  the Fondue as given in the recipe I submitted, as is quite rare for all of us to be in the same place at the same time, that is we are journalists working in assorted sectors ...   

 

As for the garlic rub, well, I love garlic as what Italian doesn´t ? However, not with my Fondue !  

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

 

To the Retired Chef,

 

He who has nothing nice to say, should NOT say anything ... Your commentary was a little too NASTY actually for a blogger.

 

 

post #5 of 8


Quote:

Originally Posted by MARGCATA View Post

To the Retired Chef,

 

He who has nothing nice to say, should NOT say anything ... Your commentary was a little too NASTY actually for a blogger.

 

 

 

Since I'm the only one who responded to your thread, you may have mixed up people. If you're referring to me in your post I'm quoting, I need to inform you that I'm not a retired chef, nor do I have a blog. I did however have close relations with journalism and communication in general, but that's a long time ago.

 

If you refer to me, sorry if you struggled in digesting my post. But since you are a journalist, it would be nice for the readers to be served the correct information, don't you think?

I know for a fact that in many fondues Maïzena is used, which is -sorry- cornstarch, not corn flour. So, if you had it made in another way like you discribed in the recipe, so be it, but it's still unusual.

Kirch is simply german for cherry as you may know. Again, I feel sorry to have to reconfirm that the transparant eau de vie that is made from cherries is not a brandy. Brandy is made from the distillation of wine, just like Cognac.

And I have to disappoint you again, but rubbing the pot with a clove of garlic is very common use in making fondue.

 

All in all, I'm glad to see you communicating, that's what a forum is all about, isn't it?

 

Maybe this will interest you. It's a very wellknown producer of eau de vie in France. I had the pleasure to taste more than a dozen different species of his fabulous eau de vies. Here's the website, enjoy; http://www.distillerie-mette.info/web/

 

 

post #6 of 8

Chris is mistaken.  An eau de vie IS a clear brandy, distilled from a fruit wine.  He's also having problems with German.  The German word for cherry is kirsche, not kirch.  A kirche is a church, which is taking eau de vie too seriously.  As far as I know (darn little) kirch wasn't a German word until used in this thread.

 

Here the flour is used not to thicken but to bind the different cheeses to one another and to the liquids.  While flour might not produce quite as silky or glossy a result as corn starch, it's every bit as effective; and in the quantities used in this recipe I don't think using one instead of the other would make much difference in texture.  On the one hand, flour needs more and more prolonged heat to get the raw off of it, and fully employ its binding qualities.  On the other hand, corn starch has a tendency to let go of alcohols and acids, so if there's a lot of booze in a cheese fondue which is going to be held for any length of time, perhaps flour would hold up better.   .

 

As I understand it, this is a recipe MARGCATA encountered and enjoyed in her travels.  It's not surprising she'd post it as it was given, as she attributed it, and as she ate it.  Perhaps, as the sophisticated cook she is, if she adjusted the recipe she might try corn starch... or not.  "Quien sabe?" 

 

Hope this isn't too nasty,

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/25/11 at 3:13pm
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you for ur research Boar ... Kirschvasser is the German name * brandy water

 

Margcata ...

post #8 of 8

One can use corn starch, flour, arrowroot, modified food starch. potato starch, tapioca starch all a matter of preference. The cheese is tossed in it , and it helps also to keep the butter fat or oil in the cheeses from collecting on top of fondue. You might say it binds them together. I love the part that sticks to the bottom of the fondue pot.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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