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Used Hobarts...and the adventures they create!

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So, I've acquired a used Hobart...when it arrived, I noticed there were a couple of rusty deep gouges in the bowl.  They have been scrubbed and cleaned, but I am still concerned.  Is there anyway to salvage the bowl?  Or, will I have to bite the bullet and buy a new one?   Any thoughts?

 

 

PS....It's a 60QT...of course!

post #2 of 8

Rusty gouges?

Tin plated steel or S/S bowl?

 

What are you doing with the mixer?

 

If it's tin plated and gouged, it will always rust.  Not nice for whipped cream, mashed pots, icings, meringues--especially, etc.  For bread it's not a big deal, clean it, wipe it out with oil, and proceed.

 

For me, I'd bit the bullet and get a new s/s bowl.  Keep the old one for bread dough. 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Yeah...I have no clue how anyone would scratch a bowl that deep!  I would be using it for pie/sugar doughs, cookie doughs, buttercream, and so on.  I think it is stainless.  The scratches look fine after cleaning, but I'm still a bit nervous about it.  

 

The owners have spent so much already, I'm nervous about asking them for a new bowl...I think they're pretty expensive.  They had purchased this Hobart before they hired me.  I wish I had seen it sooner!  

 

Thanks for all your help! 

 

 

post #4 of 8

Stainless as a one-colour, mono-tone, consistant silver colour.  Tin plated has a patchy, non-consistant colour to it.  I gotta check if my 30 qt s/s/ bowl is magnetic, tin plated steel definately is

 

It's easy to gougea bowl, drop something hard and metalic in the bowl, and let 'er rip.

D.A.M.H.I.K.T...........

 

The bowls are expensive, but you can be, uhh, "creative" about asking for a new one.

 

Love the 60 qts, but they are big.  You can get a "reducing collar" that will accept a 40, 30, or 20 qt bowl, on a 60 qt mixer,  but you also have to get the appropriate "reduced" agitator (paddle whip, etc) as well..  Most bakery supply places have these, and usually they are used and a bit cheaper.  Two bowls can be very helpful in a fast paced kitchen--almost, but not quite, like having two mixers 

 

S/S will rust if metal particles are imbedded in it--like steel wool or steel scrubbie strands imbedded in a fresh gouge.  Get yourself a Dremel tool and some Jewler's rouge and polish up the gouge.

 

If the bowl is tin plated steel, the gouge will allways rust, like 5 minutes after washing it.  All you can do is wipe on a little oil and wipe off the rust.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks again.  I think we'll try the Dremel and jeweler's rouge first.  Then, hope for the best.  Bowls are around 350 bucks!  Luckily, we have a brand spankin' new 20QT and a few smaller kitchen aids.  We'll make it work if the bowl turns out to be an issue.  

post #6 of 8

Tip about using the Dremel on stainless steel:

 

Make sure your Dremel bit is the highest quality STAINLESS bit the make. If you use a non-stainless bit, or one of a lower quality than the stainless you are working on you will be putting more carbon (rust) into the stainless and it will never work. You need to Dremel the carbon contamination out of the gouge.

post #7 of 8

No, no, not a bit, a polishing head, felt or stitched cotton, loaded with jewler's rouge.  Buff or polish as best you can.  Even plain carbon steel with a mirror polish won't rust as bad as plain steel with a rough finish.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 8

You may be able to take the bowl to a tin smith to have it refurbished. I would imagine that would be cheaper than a new one. 

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