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Rack of Pork

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I need help! I want to cook a rack of pork this weekend (Saturday night, 10/29), I need help before then. 
My first thought is to boil the pork rack for 30 minutes and then finish in the oven. I am not a chef however, just enjoy cooking.  

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 8

don't boil it. Posting from my mobile so more later. just don't boil it.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 8

DO NOT BOIL IT!

 

Wait for Phatch, or for someone else (maybe even me crazy.gif)to post roasting directions.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #4 of 8

Don't boil it, unless you're planning on pork soup.

 

Trim if necessary, but with "modern pork" and most butchers, you want to leave as much fat as possible.

 

French the bones if you like, but I'm guessing that's overkill for you.  If you haven't bought the roast yet, and you're using a "custom butcher," have him do it.  Have him remove the feather bones too or you'll have to carve around them. 

 

Season the pork with a good rub or seasoning paste -- we can discuss those, if you like.  Pork benefits from injecting, but that may be too advanced for you.

 

Allow the roast to "temp" (come to near room-temperature on the counter) before roasting. 

 

Put some vegetables, root vegetables and/or aromatics in the roasting pan, to take advantage of the drippings and to get a start on making a sauce. 

 

If your roast came with frilly "panties" on the Frenched bones, remove them and replace with foil. 

 

Roast in a pre-heated, 350F oven.  You may glaze the roast if you like, once or twice during the last half hour of cooking.  Use a weight/ temp chart to get an idea of how long it's going to take.  Don't rely on it too heavily, use a thermometer to test for doneness. 

 

The modern "gourmand" temp is around 130F.   But that's probably not what's happening here. "Modern" pork is medium-well done at around 140F, but some people are very conservative about it and like it done to around 155F - 160F.  Trichinosis no longer  exists in North American farm-raised pigs, so you don't need the extra doneness to make pork safe; but people are what they are and resistant to change.  Your guests' tastes come first. 

 

Cover the roast with a loose tent of foil and allow the roast to rest at least 15 minutes before carving.  20 is better.  That means you can take the roast out, serve the first course, eat it, and clear the table before carving.

 

BDL

post #5 of 8

BDL's given the important info.

 

What else do you want to serve it with?

 

At the moment, a paste of garlic, rosemary and lemon appeals to me. Last time I did this I used Za'atar as the primary seasoning in a Crown roast (basically two racks tied together with frenched bones forming the peaks of the crown).

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 8

I'm very curious, who suggested you to boil it?  Sometimes misguided cooks try to boil ribs before they grill them but I've never heard of a rack of pork.  This cut is the pork equivalent of prime rib, it should be roasted in a high heat oven, not overcooked, carved and served with gravy or jus.

 

BDL gave good advice, I'll add my 2 cents.  Forget frenching, it's an old fashioned presentation and serves no purpose other than to be froofroo.  You wouldn't french a prime rib of beef, why french a rack?

 

First of all score the top of the roast where the fat is.  Then rub the whole roast, bones and everything with lots of salt and pepper.  Be generous, pork can be devastatingly bland.  Now sear the roast, fat side down in a hot pan on the stove top, just enough to make it a golden brown.  Turn off the heat and turn the roast right side up again.  In a small roasting pan through in halved onions, carrots, garlic, celery, mushrooms, or whatever root veggies you prefer.  Toss them with salt, pepper, olive oil, and thyme or herbs of choice.  Rest the pork, fat side up on top of the veggies.  Now paint the roast with a wet rub (mine has garlic paste, olive oil, dijon mustard, dried herbs, salt/pepper, and lemon juice).  Roast in a 375 preheated oven until the internal temp is 150.

 

Take out the roast and remove from the pan.  Wrap the meat in foil and let it rest while you make your sauce.

 

In the pan there are now roasted vegetables.  You may want to remove the veggies and serve them.  I like to crush them in the pan and incorporate them into the gravy.  Use a potato masher to mash them.  Place the roasting pan over a burner and add chicken stock to deglaze the pan.  You can also add a little of the wine you will be serving for dinner, red or white.  If you want to make your sauce thick like a gravy add a tbsp of flour, otherwise leave it as jus.  Reduce the sauce and then strain it.

 

I like to remove the bones from the roast, I don't know how to explain that, maybe someone else can better than I, but basically I just carve them out like you do in a prime rib so that I am free to slice the meat without hinderance of bones. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 8

Beef rib roasts and pork racks are butchered differently.  Typically, the ends of the beef ribs are sawed off, and sold for other purposes; but not true with pork (or lamb, for that matter), the ribs are left longer.  In it's untrimmed state, the end part of a pork rib from the rack is covered mostly with fat but very little meat; and isn't particularly attractive for service unless you're looking for an extremely rustic presentation. 

 

If you want to carve a rack of pork and present pieces which look like "lollipop" chops, you have to French.  I think Frenched bones look more elegant and festive, but that's me. 

 

Besides, more often than not, the ribs come Frenched or at least partially Frenched, with their ends bare -- and the gristle between them removed when you buy them.  Frequently, they even come with frilly panties already on them.  Maybe that's regional, I don't know.

 

Not to disagree with my own bad self, but there's a modern trend to go very old school with beef rib roasts and trim them "cowboy" or "tomahawk" style with the rib ends exposed and Frenched.  You need great big plates to serve slices carved from one of those roasts.

 

In any case, you don't have to French (or have your butcher French) if you don't want to.  It's only presentation. 

 

BDL

post #8 of 8

Too late now, but I would suggest brining for anyone else who is interested in this subject. For pork a brine can be as simple as 1/4 cup salt in 8 cups of water. You can add spices and/or herbs to this, or replace part or all of the water with something more flavorful. Pineapple juice comes to mind, for example. Kind of the "Hawaiian pizza" idea. Good vinegar can work, as well, though I would not replace all the water with it.

 

As far as the mechanics go, mix up your brine, place your pork in an appropriately sized zip-lock bag, pour the brine over it, and stash it in the fridge for a day or two. With pork chops or other smaller cuts, over-brining might happen in that amount of time, but with a roast it takes awhile for the brine to do its voodoo.

 

Done properly, brining will make pork more tender, more juicy, and more flavorful. All good things.

 

I would recommend experimenting with both the brining time and the brining ingredients. Start simple, work your way up. If you experiment with pork chops, start your brining time at about two hours with that ratio of salt.

 

Another thing I would consider is a Kalbi marinade. For those of you who are not familiar, this is a traditional Korean marinade. It tastes wonderful, and to people who have not had it before, it has that "Wow, this is really good, but I have no idea what I am tasting" thing. Here is my recipe for it: http://kellyskitchentips.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-to-make-korean-kalbi-marinade.html

 

And yes, for you purists, there is technically another recipe specifically for pork, but I think this one works quite well.

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