or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes ›  The Bespoke Out of the Ordinary Italian Villages Off the Beaten Path - Part 4
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Bespoke Out of the Ordinary Italian Villages Off the Beaten Path - Part 4

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Written by: Margcata

 

There are uncountable fanstastic Italian towns and it would take a lifetime to visit them all. My many years of exploring, discovering, sìpping, taste testing, sharing and delighting in is presented in this shortened series of enchanting villages.

 

Monterosso Al Mare, Ligurian Coast and its Pesto, Gubbio, Umbria and its Ceramics, Montepulciano, Tuscany and its Wines, Asolo, Veneto and its Literature and Alberobello and its Trulli Architecture which was covered in an earlier posting ( thread ) on Cheftalk are re.edited for your enjoyment.

 

The Cinque Terre is the name that was bestowed upon 5 quaint hamlets, Monterosso Al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manrola and Riomaggiore that line the dramatic Ligurian coastline  for over 20 miles. They are linked by ferry service or via train. Monterosso, the largest of these 5 villages, has a permanent population of approximately 2.100 people.

The beguiling historic district called Borgo Antico di Monterosso is chockful of old world enchantment and worth a stop over.

 

The 3 best restaurants not over run by Italian tourists are:

 

L´Alta Marea Ristorante

Trattoria Ciak

Ristorante Mo9retto

 

The specialties in this village focus on Pesto and pastas include short styles and lasagna.

 

There is a local Cinque Terre white wine and Schiacchetra, a white dessert wine from grapes grown on the terraced slopes behind the village.

 

As the road to the ancient town of Gubbio curves its way through uncountable pasture lands, you shall encounter the 1st century A.D. Roman Amphitheatre. The venues not to miss for their culinary specialties here are:

 

Ristorante Alla Fornace di Mastro Giorgio

Taverna del Lupo

18th Century Villa Montegranelli

 

All of these three venues have splendid cuisine. The specialties of this zone are:

 

Pasta with truffles

Polenta with grilled meats

Risotto with truffles

 

All served on gorgeous hand painted ceramic plates.

 

Stroll over the Camignano Bridge, take in the Palazzo Dei Consoli and the Pottery galore.

 

One of the highest villages in Tuscany and one of the best preserved historic ones is Montepulciano. The local people describe their wine as " D´Ogni Vino IL Rei "

which translates as " Of all the wines, King " ...

 

The full bodied reds are made from the Prugnolo Gentile Clone grapes stemming from the sensational Sangiovese Grape. Possessing a violet rim on a twirl for bouquet, this is a Government DOCG, Designation of Origin, Appellation or Denomination of Origin.

 

This town is filled with cantine = wine cellars, tasting cellars, wine shops with taste testing sections, bars and are run by people who love nothing more than a passionate conversation about wine ... The ones I enjoyed were:

 

Oinochóe on Vía Voltaia Nel Corso

Cantina Grattavecchi - Located next to the village Maria dei Servi Church 

 

Of course, Chianti Colli Senesi called Chianto is also a popular red wine in the zone.

 

For white wine, try the Valdichiana ...

 

Ristorante La Grotta, serves local specialties for which travellers rave about. We shared the following:

 

Crostini

Boar and Fresh Game Pates

Pinci: hand rolled pastas ( laborious ) filled and painted with egg and baked

Roasted meats

Braised white beans in brodo

Charcuterie ( smoked Boar )

Ragú

Biscotti

 

Asolo, Veneto and its Literature ...

 

In 1838, at the age of 26, the English poet Robert Browning made his first trip to Italy.

His first visit to Asolo, an enchanting Renaissance town, tucked into the green hills of Veneto in particular played a quintessential role throughout his life. Here you shall find:

1) Gastronomia Sgarbossa - The NYC Zabars

2) Osteria al Bacaro

3) Enoteca Asolo Wine Shop

 

Ristorante Ai Due Archi ...

The extraordinaire, prized and unique in this trattoria is the thick, large fresh grilled White Asparagus stalks ... and the Crespelle which is a crepe filled with the white asparagus stalks.

 

Another dish stemming from Renaissance times is the Pasta e Fagioli, a bean and shell pasta chowder and pesce in saor, a well known recipe throughout Veneto, each family making its own version: fresh catch of day with pinenuts and raisins, baked in the oven ... Lovely with seabass.

 

Lets hear from aficionados  who have travelled throughout Italia.

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 7

This is just deeply unfair.  I'm salivating, and half a world away.  

 

Seriously thanks for this and the encouragement to return!  The only wisdom I can offer from my visits is that the less a place looked like a restaurant, the better the food. 

post #3 of 7

Doesn't this thread really belong in another forum?  We have a restaurants thread it would fit better in. 

 

Not sure what you mean by "bespoke ... villages", Margcata.  Are they made to order? 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

 

Thanks for ur views. Yes, I love Italy and I fly over to Italy at least once a year to revamp my grandmothers recipes and explore, discover and have a grand time. I agree, that Italy has its share of clandestine venues with charming, enchanting and unforgettable cuisine and wines and people, the most important part.  

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

 

Good Morning,

 

I had already apologised for the error several days ago  and did not want to re.type the whole article. I had asked for some SOS to move it however, I have not heard back yet if this is possible from my end. I believe this could be moved on the technical side.

 

  

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

The villages I had been to in Italia, reflect a totally extraordinaire aspect of the culinary world. I have devoted most of my time in Europe in revamping my paternal grandmothers recipes and exploring the bounty of this vast heaven on earth ... therefore, from my point of view, bespoke.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Colin,

 

Yes, do save up and make several trips to Italia ... The secret is do a couple of provinces located close together and explore ... Pleased to hear, this has motivated ... It is a fab country in which u shall find, even if ur Italian is minimal basic, Italians love to socialise and offer their eatery to u and ur guests open armed. They treat u like family ... Do study basic greetings and baisc gastro vocabulay, numbers and u can find many of their children working at their venues, speaking English however, a few Italian words, go a long way ... Do a free course on line ...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes ›  The Bespoke Out of the Ordinary Italian Villages Off the Beaten Path - Part 4