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Phyllo Dough Chicken Pot Pie

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I'm planning a dinner party and I thought up a recipe for a chicken pot pie using phyllo dough for the crust.   I'm planning on making the filling (chicken, shitake mushrooms, kale, celery, petite peas, onion, carrots, garlic, cream, wine, broth, spices, herbs) before and then lining a baking dish with 3 layers of phyllo, putting in the filling and doing 3 layers of phyllo on top and baking for about 50 minutes.

 

Question: I don't like cooking while guests are there so, can I pre-assemble everything (phyllo, filling, phyllo in baking dish) in the morning and pop in the oven while I'm serving hors d'oeurves? If so, should I wrap the pre-assembled dish in plastic wrap or is there anything else I need to know?

 

If it can't be pre-assembled, if I cook it in the morning, at what temp should I re-heat it? 

 

Many thanks to all for answers/suggestions!

 

 

post #2 of 18

I don't think it's a good idea, sorry. The phyllo is so delicate.

Is this a main dish or a starter? I'm just asking because after an hors d'oeuvre there could be or a starter or a main.

 

I understand that you make some kind of a large "millefeuille" covering the the whole tray? As in 2 layers of pastry with a filling in the middle?In that case I would suggest to use puff pastry. Just separately bake 2 sheets of puff pastry first, the bottom and the top of the millefeuille.

Use a fork to punch the whole surface of the pastry with a lot of small holes so the pastry doesn't rise in the oven (it will always rise a little). I would eggwash one piece of pastry that will be used as the top. Bake each sheet of pastry for 20-30 minutes at 200°C/400°F.

 

Take the baked pastry sheets out and leave to cool. Now you can assemble with the completely cooled filling.

When your guests arrive, put the whole dish in the oven for 30 minutes at 180°C/350°F.

 

Simply buy good puff pastry made with 100% butter. (Read the package!).

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi Chris,

 

Thanks so much for your reply.

 

First, it's a main course.

 

What I've ultimately decided to do is, pre-cook the filling earlier (I've done this before and it tastes great reheated) and assemble it (using Phyllo dough) right before my guests arrive and pop it in the oven.  By the time the hors d'oeurves are done, it should be ready.  So, hopefully, problem is solved.

 

If anyone has any other phyllo dough suggestions, I'd love to hear them.  (I'm planning on using a combo of olive oil spray and melted butter for in-between the phyllo layers)

post #4 of 18

Yes.  It can -- by all means -- be preassmbled.  It can even be held frozen. 

 

Most good chicken pot pie recipes that I know have the filling not quite fully cooked before topping with a crust and baking.  So (if you're not freezing), do barely cook the chicken and leave the vegetables a little underdone.

 

Let me clarify what I mean by "barely cook."  The chicken has to be cooked through in order to prevent contamination before holding it cold mixed with anything else.  But just barely cooked through.  An internal temp of 140 is enough for safety. 

 

I don't know about you, but I poach the chicken (or parts), simmer the veg in the resulting broth, and use the broth as a base for the gravy.  Like you, I think of chicken pie more as an assemblage than a braise en croute.

 

If you do the top crust at the last moment -- as you plan -- you're approaching the ideal pie: a filling that's had time for the flavors to marry and a fresh crust.  Yowzers!

 

Bon apetit,

BDL

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks, BDL.

 

And yes, that's EXACTLY what I'm planning to do (with the chicken.)  I poach the chicken (breast with fat trimmed and bone in) in stock with herbs (herbs de provence, a tinge extra rosemary, fresh dill and fresh cilantro, garlic, wine) and some diced spanish onions.   Vs. cooking the veggies in the stock, I'm planning on separately quick sauteing them (I add the frozen petit peas when I ultimately do the assembly.)  Then, slice the chicken & add to the sauteed veggies and refrigerate overnight.  I like the extra olive oil flavor the quick sauteing adds.  When it's time to assemble, I'll use the retained stock, I'll take about 3/4 cup and add a little flour and cream to taste, add spices, a little freshly ground pepper and kosher salt to taste and assemble with the phyllo and bake.

 

Thanks again for the feedback.  Can't wait to do it.

 

BTW--any suggestions re: brands for phyllo?  (I live in NYC so was planning on going to a big market here that has Athens but have also heard it might be better to actually go to a Greek restaurant and buy it fresh--if they'll do it!)

post #6 of 18

No NYC suggestions.  If she doesn't pick it up herself, try a PM to Koukouvagia.  She would know.

 

BDL

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Many thanks!

post #8 of 18

I think Filo is a little to greasy for pot pies. If you assembled it in the morning and held it the dough would dry out (as philo has to be oil or butter brushed). A real pie crust would suit you pot pie better. Also I would not use kale, I would use broc. floretsJust some suggetions have fun with it no matter which way you do it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 18

They do not make their own either(at least the ones I know)  they buy commercial size sheets of Athens Philo Dough. They also buy Athens philo cups for Hors d ourves

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 18

I wouldn't use phyllo for lining a baking dish, but some sort of phyllo topping concoction would work I would think. Puff pastry might also work. 

 

I think, if I were in your shoes, I would rather use store bought pie crusts than phyllo for something like this. If I HAD to choose between the two. 

post #11 of 18

The OP is making a pie with a top crust only.  There are a lot of great possibilities.  I've used homemade biscuit dough, flaky pie dough, buttery (French technique) pate brise, homemade puff pastry, store bought puff pastry, and "tube" croissant dough, all with good results.  I like them all. 

 

When I was still earning money for cooking I had a couple of "celebrities" (one a famous cooking personality, the other a studio head) both of who doted on chicken pie.  The personality liked a single crust, flaky pie dough pie, the other preferred hers with a biscuit crust.  The pie woman was originally from SoCal, the biscuit lady is from Chicago.  I don't know why this is important. 

 

For a two crust pie, I'd only either use flaky pie dough or a crumbly pate brise.  Each has its charms.

 

Not to rehash the obvious, but the OP was specifically asking about filo, which ought to be more than fine if you like shattering crusts.  Strudel dough, would work too; and for the life of me I can't see why you couldn't make a chicken strudel with most of the same stuff, sauce on the side.

 

After all, why the heck not? 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 11/9/11 at 7:14pm
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sauce1 View Post


 

BTW--any suggestions re: brands for phyllo?  (I live in NYC so was planning on going to a big market here that has Athens but have also heard it might be better to actually go to a Greek restaurant and buy it fresh--if they'll do it!)


Where in nyc are you located?  If you're willing to head out to Astoria there's lots of specialty greek stores that sell various brands of phyllo dough but I can't imagine the same thing is not available in the city.  Good luck finding a restaurant that makes their own, if you find one let me know. 

 

I'd just like to say that phyllo dough may be my favorite substance on earth. 

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #13 of 18


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

The OP is making a pie with a top crust only.  



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by sauce1 View Post
 and then lining a baking dish with 3 layers of phyllo, putting in the filling and doing 3 layers of phyllo on top and baking for about 50 minutes.

 

 

 



 

Again, phyllo dough will work just fine for a topping, but I wouldn't line a baking dish with it. If you are going to line a baking dish, then some sort of pie crust is better. 

 

Puff pastry is another idea for a topping...just saying. 

post #14 of 18

Want to do it quick and easy, My wife takes Pilsbury Grands biscuits and rolls them all out on a floured counter top then uses that, It is good and foolproof  no bowls to wash,no mess. Comes out consistant all the time. THEY ALSO MAKE GOOD DUMPLINGS FOR CHICKEN STEW.

It can even be the store brand as it is cheaper then Pilsbury and practically the same.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi All,

 

Thanks so much for the many replies.  I, actually, have been so swamped w/work I haven't had a chance to check back in but definitely have good news to report.

 

I decided to cook this for Thanksgiving and so far, it's REALLY worked out well.  The filling is done (as we talked about here, poached the skinless chicken breasts--with bone-- with broth, fresh & dry herbs, wine, onion, etc), sauteed the celery, carrots, extra vidalla onion, garlic,  shitake mushrooms & a bit of kale in olive oil, herbs a little more wine.  Chopped the chicken, reserved about 2 cups of the broth, added butter, heavy cream, a little grand marnier, spices to taste and slowly blended everything, adjusted the spice.  It really tastes spectacular and is chilling in the fridge.  There are DEFINITELY many many flavors in it, it all works.  I happen to love cooking without a net (worst case scenario, I do things in advance so if something doesn't work out, I have time to re-do or go back to something I've done tons of times) so it was thrilling to do!

 

I ended up buying Kronos filo (mainly because I've been so busy w/work I didn't have time to find a restaurant or specialty store and I'm near Fairway here in NYC.) I'm sure it'll be fine. Because it's Thanksgiving, I didn't want to do a traditional chicken pot pie and think this will be a bit more festive.  (Normally, I'd do a pate brisee as the crust.) I'm brushing the filo w/melted butter mixed with a little olive oil.

 

Guests are arriving tomorrow at 6pm, so I will assemble it at around 4:30pm-ish, adding the petite peas and filo, and refrigerate for about an hour and a quarter, with just a plastic wrap on top before popping it in the oven around 6:15'ish.  Serving dinner at 7pm.  I'm serving it with Champagne, a chilled cranberry sauce (with orange & lime zest), and a salad with arugula, frisee, orange grape tomatoes.  For hors d'oeuvres, bruschetta with goat cheese, tomatoes and crispy, sauteed chorizo.

 

My friends & I wanted an unorthodox Thanksgiving and I think this'll do the trick.

 

Thanks so much for all of your great suggestions!  Wishing you all a wonderful holiday.

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

oops--almost forgot--for dessert, one of my friends is making a tarte tartin with creme fraiche & apple brandy.  And, in addition, I'm serving lemon sorbet coated with a variation on Dukkah (an Egyptian condiment) : I toasted and ground raw pistachios& almonds, added raw sugar and a little sea salt. Topped with fresh mint leaves. 

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
second oops (only because I haven't figured out how to edit this thread--when I click "Edit thread" it doesn't take me to the post I want to edit)--the dough I bought is Kontos, not Kronos, for anyone who's interested. And I've decided to do the assembly right before I put it in the oven, while my guests are here. Don't want to risk having the dough dry out.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

Well--it REALLY worked out and the pie turned out great! Thanks again to all for the suggestions.  Everyone had 2nds (even 3rds) and the entire thing was devoured.

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