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Culinary Community Colleges?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

My original intention was to go to a culinary school in Europe...I changed my mind and I am looking into community colleges in the US. Any advice/suggestions of good culinary/pastry schools in US? (Community College). Is it more worth it to go to community college rather than splurging on private institutions like LCB and CIA? (I heard a lot of scary stories from places like that....)

post #2 of 8

You mentioned in your other post that you are from Canada.  In Canada we have several good culinary/baking community college schools, so why don't you check them out?  Where are you located in Canada?

In the Greater Toronto Area, you have George Brown College and Humber College.  Both are excellent schools.  In the rest of Ontario, there is Algonquin College, Confederation College, Fanshawe College, Loyalist College and Niagara College.  

 

 

post #3 of 8

There are many (many!!) good community college programs! The cost savings is immense and the education is, often, very good. Of course, you will need to do your homework, i.e. talk to current students, visit, inquire about placement assistance, etc. I had the opportunity to visit North Las Vegas Community College and the facility was gorgeous and very well staffed by highly qualified instructors, for example. The community college around here, as well, has a very reputation and nice facility. As with any advice on colleges, what works for one doesn't for all. School itself doesn't work for everybody, either. That's a whole other discussion.

 

Good luck on your endeavor!

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #4 of 8

I attend a community college for my culinary training, and I will say that just because they aren't "name-brand" schools, doesn't mean you're not going to get the proper education. I had originally applied to CIA in San Antonio, but due to my background (admittedly, I have a felonious criminal background from when I was a teenager.. stupid mistake with checks) it was becoming a huge hassle to get accepted there. They were going to allow me to attend, but it was going to take a lot of extra paperwork; namely, they wanted an additional six letters of recommendation on top of the one I'd already sent them. ANYWAY, in light of that situation I applied at a community college and after some research, I heard nothing but very good things about their culinary program -- from former students as well as some of the top executive chefs in our area. Question is, though, what part of the U.S. are you wanting to relocate to? East coast, west coast, midwest, south, north...? I'm sure every region has its' fair share of community colleges with good culinary programs....

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

I prefer NY or California. Any suggestions?

post #6 of 8

I'm really not too familiar with either coast.. I'm from right smack dead-center of the country myself. This may be useful in your search, though.. it's a listing of pretty much every community college in Cali:
http://californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu/maps/districts.asp

 

I'd say if any are in an area you want, do some research on that school's culinary program (if any) specifically.

post #7 of 8

Im at a community college at the moment for baking and pastry arts. its such a great school. its about a half hour drive from Johnson and whales, and it is 10x cheaper. My baking chef actually teaches at JWU as well. Going to community college is such a smart choice, espically if you do not have the money to spend on an university. Our program is very intense, we have long hours in the kitchen, there is no excuse for not being in class, and we work lots of functions for the school. 

post #8 of 8

For the life of me I can't see all you young people spending 40,000. to go to culinary scool. In my opinion they are simply for profit businesses like any other type business.

        Community Colleges are as good as any. I went to one . The trick is you get the basics like every other school THE REST IS UP TO YOU to learn more on your own. Don't only learn how to do a task, learn Why you are doing it that particular way..  To pay all that money and then graduate and work a line somewhere for 14 to 15 an hour is crazy. You start your adult life in hock which to me is crazy. Whether you learn to make and clarify a consomme in a community college or  a supposed upscale school the procedures are the same., so why pay more?

       Read, Question and observe as well as experiment all you can on your own. By doing this and being interested you can't help but to be a success in your field

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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