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fixing a forcemeat for a terrine

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

You are preparing a straight forcemeat for a terrine. You are at the point of the process having completed a test. The test results have indicated that the forcemeat is not binding well. What are the possible reasons for this outcome explain why and explain what is the remedy for each possible cause?

 

what are three possible causes and solutions?

post #2 of 16

Welcome

Sounds like an exam question - or is it homework?

 

Anyway, I'm moving it to the culinary student forum on the site.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

its a critical thinking question.

post #4 of 16

Your question is incomplete, What kind of a forcemeat is it? Typically a forcemeat is a lean meat and fat emulsion that is established when the ingredients are forced togeather by grinding, sieving, or pureeing.Depending on the grinding and emulsifying methods and the intended use, the forcemeat can have a smooth consistency or be heavily textured and coarse. In either case, the combined ingredients must be more than just a mixture- they must form an emulsion so that it will hold together properly when sliced and have a rich and pleasant taste and feel in the mouth.Here is proper technique for making forcemeat.

 

Method:

 

1. Make sure that everything is cold keep on ice or in kept in frig including equipment(the robo coupe) if possible

2.Grind foods properly , cut all solid food into dice or strips that will easily fit into the grinder's feed tube.Or purchase ground meat if you do not have a grinder.

3. However, you get the ground meat make sure that you finish in food processor, and then run it through a tamis for the smoothest possibile texture.

 

Binding Ingredients are known as panadas and added to the forcemeats to prevent from breaking or crumbling when sliced.The three that are usually used depending on what kind of forcmeat you are making are:

1.Bread Panada (diced bread soaked in milk)

2.Flour Panada (bechamelle sauce)

3.Pate Choux, In some cases heavy cream and eggs, or rice & potatoes

The main ingredients are:

Dominant or theme meat, Fat, Panada or other binder, seasoning,flavoring, and garnish (the fat is usually pork fat) I hope that this as helped you can easily look up recipes for forcemeat on line. It is kind of like making a  meatloaf

 

1.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

would a lack of garnish be a factor the result of the poach test not binding?

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

and its a straight force meat for a terrine

post #7 of 16

 Posted by thesantonastaso View Post

would a lack of garnish be a factor the result of the poach test not binding?


No.  Absolutely not.

 

The best quick fix for a loose farce of the type you describe is beaten egg. 

 

If you know for certain that the reason the farce is too loose is for lack of fat, mash some lard with a fork and beat it in.  You may get lucky, or not.  

 

Adding panade in the form of breadcrumbs or something similar will force you to allow the entire farce the opportunity to hydrate and the flavors to marry, and adjust the seasoning and garnish balance to make up for the extra bulk.  

 

Cream, or any cream mixture, is uncertain.  It will most likely do the opposite of what you hope, especially if your trying method is poaching.  Cooked off cream will bind.  That works for something which will be cooked open, on a hot surface, but not with a farce.     

 

Good luck,

BDL

 

 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 11/28/11 at 9:35pm
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post #8 of 16

 Proteins were were partially cooked while grinding

 

Some fat has pre-rendered itself

 

 

post #9 of 16

there's a reason charcuterie is considered "difficult"

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesantonastaso View Post

You are preparing a straight forcemeat for a terrine. You are at the point of the process having completed a test. The test results have indicated that the forcemeat is not binding well. What are the possible reasons for this outcome explain why and explain what is the remedy for each possible cause?

 

what are three possible causes and solutions?


Not knowing what your ingredients are I would say you may need more fat most terrines are anywhere between 20- 30 percent and leaner meats like venison or elk may be even higher depending on what you have to use. Think about a hamburger, most are 80/20%.  
 

 

post #11 of 16

multiple reasons, your grinder isn't chilled enough, you overcooked your terrine, too much snarsis (sp), you didn't grind it correctly (progressive grind), etc.

post #12 of 16

before asking such a question on a welcome forum he or she bettter introduce itself better!

to answer that question.

missing the rules, isn't it?

 

master in terrines.

 

post #13 of 16

a panade one is just a cream and milk soaked with white bread. seasoned with some stuff (Xfile stuff) seasoning.

for a day then it is added to the forcemeat fish or meat!. to terrines.to bind it !

 

it is the best way to do vegetarians terrines¬!

 

his or her problem is the fact that he or she did not introduced itself properly!

 

 

post #14 of 16

the way you write it your problem is simple.

the way you wrote it even you can find the problem as you see it!

make seeing the problem as you see it but not seeing it!

 

An arabic comandrum!

(problem)

 

Ok

 

that is not easy!.

but then if rules implied according to how a terrine should been done in classical ways it should have been successful.#

then you asking a question before introduction!

it has been failed and you are angry!¬

 

well tell me more about!

I am all hears!.

and I will tell you my advices with the crew too.

post #15 of 16

texture is one once you test the mix!

 

seaonoing! when you test the example befor coking!

 

(but all that can be shown by only one a master) if you are in aprentishipe

 

if egg is too old or too cold your mix will fail.

 

what else

 

modern ways no panade!

that is a dead loss for some terrine if decided no I won't place panande!.

 

grindings is!.

what type of terrine you want to do!

 

do you know that failing is a great path for success?

 

I failed

 

tell the truth!

 

D

 

 

post #16 of 16

just write the recipe right below that post!.

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