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How Do You Like Your Fish and Chips?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

With the temperature dropping (don't hate me for living in SoCal) and football getting serious, a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of fish and chips.  My fancy, too. 

 

  • Batter:  For fish and chips, I do the fish tempura style with a light, cold, flour batter over a light, corn-starch dredge; and keep the seasoning simple.  I sometimes add a pinch of turmeric to the batter for color.
  • You? 

 

  • Oil:  I like corn oil; and cook the potatoes in the same oil as the fish. 
  • You?

 

  • Potatoes:  Russets; hand cut to medium thickness and well soaked and washed.  If I'm ambitious, I par cook in warn oil; drain; rest; and fry to finish in hot oil.  
  • You?

 

  • Favorite types of fish:  I like the traditional choices of haddock and cod a great deal, but also like halibut, (some kinds of) catfish, snapper, bass, loupe de mer, and a bunch of others.   Anyway, it's more the quality of what's available, than the species -- as long as it's not too oily.  Never salmon.  
  • You?

 

  • Thickness:  I prefer a fairly substantial piece, but not all fillets are like that.  "Whatever works," works for me. 
  • You?

 

  • Malt Vinegar or Tartar Sauce:   Life is short, why not both?  Lemon too.   Remoulade has been known to happen.  So has "Mexican mayonnaise" (mayo, lime juice, a pinch of chipotle)
  • You?

 

  • Salt:  Salt must go on when the fish is very hot.  I find coarse, "finishing" salts work very well... better than table salt (the idea of fancy salt has the UK members wincing, no doubt). 
  • You?

 

  • Frying Order:  I cook the potatoes until just done, then cook the fish on top of the potatoes in the same oil.  The couple of minutes it takes to cook the fish compensate for my over-eagerness to have the potatoes done and out. 
  • You?

 

BDL

post #2 of 9

Slightly heavier than tempura batter

 

Haven't thought about the oil, but I like a clean vegetable oil.

 

Russett wedges, peeled.

 

Believe it or not, I like persillade with my fish.  Hit it with salt and persillade straight out of the fryer, squeeze of lemon juice.  Tartar sauce on the side.

 

Halibut.

 

Newcastle Brown Ale.  :)

 

 

 

post #3 of 9

Beer batter

Haddock, or at a push, cod

Maris piper or Maris Peer tatties - preferably twice or thrice cooked

 

Served with lashings of vinegar, sea salt and HP sauce.

post #4 of 9

Batter - Beer batter. Thickish.

 

Oil - Usually canola or peanut oil.

 

Potatoes - Russets, always par-fried

 

Fish - Cod. If I'm doing fish and chips I'll usually sneak in a couple of prawns and/or scallops too.

 

Thickness - I'll trim to get fairly even, thicker pieces. The rest will be used in a chowder.

 

Tartar Sauce (tangy, made w/ french cornichons and lot's of lemon, purchased mayo.)

 

Salt, sea salt.

 

I cook fries and fish separately, oil used for fish will be used again, but only for fish.

 

 

"The satisfactions of making a good plate of food are surprisingly varied, and only one, and the least important of them, involves eating what you've made" - Bill Buford, Heat

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"The satisfactions of making a good plate of food are surprisingly varied, and only one, and the least important of them, involves eating what you've made" - Bill Buford, Heat

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post #5 of 9

Batter:  Rice flour, beer, s/p

Oil:  Peanut

Potatoes: Idaho Russetts....peeled ran through the mandoline, iced down, fried twice

Types of Fish: Cod, Haddock, Halibut, Grouper, Snapper, and because of location Great Lakes Whitefish

Thickness: Like you fairly sizeable

Condiments include, malt vinegar, tartar sauce or remoulade

Salt; of course

Order: Since I have 2 fryers It is not an issue.

 

post #6 of 9

Fish n' chips is one of those dishes that I would never cook at home, it's pub food.  There is a Greek version of fisn 'n chips we make with bacalao, lightly dredged in flour and shallow fried in olive oil.  It's a classic greek dish served with skordalia and lemon wedges.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 9

Batter: Beer batter, applied slightly thicker than tempura. Fish dusted with cornstarch, first, then dipped.

 

Oil: Peanut. I never use Canola, for reasons other than culinary.

 

Potatoes: Russets, usually, cut in wedges.

 

Fish: Cod, preferably. But use other white-fleshed fish as well. We like haddock, but around here can't get it in thick enough filets.

 

Thickness: Depends. For just the two of us, at home, whatever works, works. If I have guests I trim everything evenly. Prefer a nice meaty chunk of fish.

 

Sauce: Varies. Often use a chili-mayo

 

Salt: Immediately after frying. This is standard with any deep-fried food.

 

Order: Potatoes, first, then the fish, cuz the spuds hold better.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 9

Anyone ever used albacore?  I ate at this place last week, it was quite good. I have always used white fish of some sort. Never would have thought of using tuna for fish & chips.

post #9 of 9

Batter: Slightly thicker than a Tempura but I like a little Sesame and Oyster sauce in for flavor

Oil: Always Peanut

Potatoes: Russets par boiled in french fry style and flash fried to finish

Fish:  Cod or Haddock cut into nice sized chunks

Sauces: Malt Vinegar and Tartar with lots of lemon and capers.

Salt: Lots on the fries with the Vinegar(I'm in Md, you gotta have vinegar chips)

 

Fish First for me since the fries are par boiled.

 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
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