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How is the Culinary Institute of America?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Right now the CIA is my first choice of school. As prestigious as it is i want to know how the experience is as in a college experience. I would like to hear from graduates/current students on this one.

Any parties up at the CIA?
Hot girls?
Night life?
 

post #2 of 17

If your going there to party I would suggest you do yourself a favor and find a cheaper school .... better yet skip the schools entirely and just go out and hit the clubs .... it would be a lot easier on your bank account and you wouldn't be wasting anyone's time other than your own.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

im absolutely not going there to party.. i just asked a few simple questions I wanted to know what night life would be like compared to any other school. Im not looking for a party school even though i want a good education i want to have a good time and make friends as well dont be so quick to judge

post #4 of 17

I didn't mean to come across quite so strong but you did ask the questions

 

Any parties up at the CIA?
Hot girls?
Night life?

 

Those are questions concerning the party life at CIA not the education.

 

But as it were,welcome to ChefTalk and by all means tell us a little about yourself ie... how long have you been in the culinary field, why did you chose CIA and which campus are you planning on attending?

post #5 of 17

I guess the "times they are a-changing", when I went to college, albeit a long time ago, the overriding purpose was to gain an education so I could afford a "good time" for the next 30-50 years. Parties, hot girls, and night life were far down the list of criteria in selecting a school. For every hour spent in class, I spent from 1-2 hours studying outside of class. From what I know asbout culinary schools, class time is on the order of 30-40 hours per week, add the up to 60-80 hours of study time and that leaves precious little for partying.

 

I'm not certain, but I've heard that C.I.A. requires a minimum of six (6) months work experience in a commercial kitchen as a prerequisite, I presume you've satisfied that requirement?

 

Secondly, a career in most areas of the culinary world leaves little time for parties, hot girls, and night-life, as you will be working while everyone else is partying. You may want to reconsider your choice of occupations.

Chef,
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post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Food is my passion and this is what i want to do in life. I have worked in the industry for 3 years already and i am 17 and i have over a year of experience in a professional kitchen. I am just your typical teenager asking a few questions about the school i plan on attending to follow my dream... although i appreciate the advice i don't need anyone telling me to reconsider.

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jelgart View Post

Food is my passion and this is what i want to do in life. I have worked in the industry for 3 years already and i am 17 and i have over a year of experience in a professional kitchen. I am just your typical teenager asking a few questions about the school i plan on attending to follow my dream... although i appreciate the advice i don't need anyone telling me to reconsider.

Pardon my ignorance, it is obvious that your years of experience trump mine, I started college in 1960 and in the culinary world in 1962, and I must have missed the 180° shift in life priorities.

 

Charge on, my young friend, the best of luck in your endeavors.
 

 

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post #8 of 17

Because you asked what the CIA is like and not "should I go", I'm not going to condemn you decision.

 

You're not going to find girls, parties, or night life. The CIA is in the middle of nowhere and has Hyde Park has the population of 20,000 people. Please keep in mind that the CIA is a small private culinary school/college and is not a big public university. The people that attend the CIA are dedicated people that have paid big bucks to attend, so they're not the "average" university student that has time or the will to party the night away.

 

If you want a night life, attend a bigger university or school closer or inside of a big city.

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker Boy100 View Post

Because you asked what the CIA is like and not "should I go", I'm not going to condemn you decision.

 

You're not going to find girls, parties, or night life. The CIA is in the middle of nowhere and has Hyde Park has the population of 20,000 people. Please keep in mind that the CIA is a small private culinary school/college and is not a big public university. The people that attend the CIA are dedicated people that have paid big bucks to attend, so they're not the "average" university student that has time or the will to party the night away.

 

If you want a night life, attend a bigger university or school closer or inside of a big city.



Thank you very much for answering my questions i appreciate it, rather than giving me advice to attend somewhere else

post #10 of 17

I took a lot of classes at CIA Napa Valley, I had a ball. I toured the CIA in NYC many yrs ago, the first thing I noticed was there wasn't much around. FCI may be a better idea, it's located in the city, with  a lot more opportunities for Culture, fine dining and fun...........................The School doesn't make a quality Chef, The student takes the information, uses it as a platform to expand that knowledge for a successful career................ChefBillyB

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

I took a lot of classes at CIA Napa Valley, I had a ball. I toured the CIA in NYC many yrs ago, the first thing I noticed was there wasn't much around. FCI may be a better idea, it's located in the city, with  a lot more opportunities for Culture, fine dining and fun...........................The School doesn't make a quality Chef, The student takes the information, uses it as a platform to expand that knowledge for a successful career................ChefBillyB


Im going to apply to JWU also but the chef i work under was a professor there for 10 yrs so it could be easier for me to get in. Im split between JWU and CIA anyone have any experiences from JWU?

 

post #12 of 17

A thought to keep in mind:

 

One cannot "buy a job or career" by paying for school, one can only prepare for a job or career by learning everything available pertaining to that job or career.

 

A high percentage, probably over 99%, of culinary school graduates will start their paying career, regardless of the school they attended, as a kitchen helper or prep cook, maybe even as a dishwasher, at somewhere in the range of $10-$15 per hour and something less than 40 hours per week, probably 20-30.

 

How fast you advance, read get promoted, both in pay and responsibility, depends on YOU, your work ethic, your willingness to listen and follow directions, and your willingness to never stop learning.

 

With a lot of sweat and perseverance, and a little luck, you'll make line cook in 1-3 years, head station cook in 2-5 years, station chef in 5-10 years, and Sous Chef in 10-15 years.

 

Once you make Chef, in 15-20 years, you will be allowed the opportunity to let your creative juices flow and tell others how to do what you want done.

 

A piece of paper from JWU, CIA, FCI, Le Cordon Bleu, etc., may get you in the door before a community college culinary graduate and might get you in right behind a cook with 2-5 years experience, but that piece of paper will not help you avoid going right back out the door, only your performance can prevent that!

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post #13 of 17

Food for thought:

 

Paying to attend JWU, CIA, FCI, etc., will not guarantee you a job or career.

 

Learning what is taught at JWU, CIA, FCI, etc., or your local community college culinary course, will prepare you to start a culinary career or job.

 

A piece of paper from JWU, CIA, FCI, etc., may get you in the door ahead of the community college graduate and right behind the line cook with three years experience, but it will not prevent you from going right back out the same door. Only your performance can keep you in the kitchen. And remember, there are far more apprenticed and OJT cooks out there than there are culinary school graduates and many of them are more than eager to start at $8/hour

 

A high percentage of culinary school graduates, maybe as high as 99%, will start as dishwashers, kitchen helpers, or prep cooks earning $8-$15 per hour with the better ones getting 40 hours per week.

 

With sweat, perseverance,  and a little luck, you'll be promoted to line cook in 1-3 years with a nominal increase in pay.

 

If you pay attention and keep learning, another 2-5 years and you'll become station head cook, again with a nominal pay increase.

 

Do an outstanding job and you'll make station Chef, the beginning state of management, probably shift to salaried, in another 3-5 years. You'll start working 40-50 hours per week

 

Keep learning, and 3-5 years later you'll be Sous Chef with a little better pay and much longer hours, say 50-80 per week

 

Remember, up to this point, you have been following orders and directions and any creativity or experimentation is on your own time and unpaid!

 

Depending on where you're working, another 3-10 years and you'll be CHEF, now you will be giving orders and directions, developing menus, and have an opportunity to let your creative juices flow.

 

How fast you advance is solely dependent on you and your ability to continue to listen and learn, not the school from which you obtained your basic training.

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post #14 of 17

If your talking about JWU in providence RI I can speak to that, being an RI resident. I don't know where your from so Providence might not even seem like a city to you, but to me it is. There is plenty to do, plenty of girls, plenty of night life. There are a bunch of other schools, Brown, PC, RIC, and other within like a 5 mile radius, so plenty of college kids, plus the kids a JWU already like to have a good time. I've never been there are had a bad time visiting friends and going out. I feel I must say what the others did, because my freshman year of college I was too concerned with having a good time and was not accustomed to the new freedom, and my grades suffered severly because of it. I did not go to school with the intention of partying, I intended on working hard and getting great grades but sometimes things don't go as planned, so be careful of your priorities is all I'll say.

post #15 of 17

Since you are still very young one of the cheapest ways to learn to cook is by doing it on your own, buy a book on the style and types of cooking that interests you. Cooking scools will give you a broad education and if you want to be a food styist or even a food writer you may not get the knowledge that you are looking for, not to say that it's a bad investment but think hard about what you see yourself doing and plan accordingly. Just remember that it is a big investment, you may want to work doing some of the things that really interest you in some sort of mentoring programor study online through the american culinary federation.Other countries still have apprenticeship programs especially for cooking,one of my French chefs apprenticed for fourteen years and never went to school. I don't want to dissuade you from recieving any sort of higher education, I'm all for it, but just remember that there are different ways to obtain it. If you decide to go to culinary school the C.I.A. is one of the best, and there if one in Napa Valley Ca., and also the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. I think that the way you asked the question C.C.A. would be a better choice.What you learn are the basics, what you do with it makes your career. 

post #16 of 17

OK. I went to the CIA. It was very cool. It was also very expensive. What I learned there was lots of stuff now in my head, that makes me who I am in the kitchen. O-T-J training didn't and couldn't give me that. That was in the mid-late '80's. Since then lots of really good Jr./Community/Trade Colleges have really brought up the culinary industry. There is a brand new place by me in/at the College of DuPage, a Community College. If I could do it over, I'd go there maybe, instead of the CIA. A whole lot of things are so much different now though, so I'm not sure what I would really do. Anyway, in all different sorts of ways, I didn't "party" when I was at the CIA. Yes, there were girls there. You're on you own with the definition of "hot". And believe it or not, all other stories aside, "nite-time" is included. You are not always on shift. Go check out the Jr./Community Colleges and Trade Schools by where you live. Maybe, you could do very well for yourself at one of those instead. 

 

College of DuPage - Top 10 Culinary Schools

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #17 of 17

this thread is hilarious...

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