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konosuke HD or white steel #2 gyuto, which one?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

All right I want a laser!!!

 

I handled both but not had the opportunity to work w/ either. I seeking opinions from my well sharpened comrades!

 

Put aside the obvious differences ( steel type,money) Which is quite simply the best?

 

Opinions are like a**holes, everone gots one, lets here them.

 

Working Chef in a busy private club kitchen, this knife will be used everyday for finer work .

 

BDL- I read an old forum were you were also debating between the 2, still loving your HD ?, would you buy it again? Any insight would be appriated.

 

As with all my knives it will be sharpened with Shapton GS(220,1000,4000) w/ the occasioanl chroium oxide on balsa strop.

 

I'm limiting it Konosuke because I've been able to handle both, they both feel great and at this level of preformance I don't want to buy any blinder than I have to.

 

Happy Holidays to All

 

 

V Lou Tay

post #2 of 10

Tough decision!  From all I've heard the steel of the HD is very good and takes a keen edge.  Yet it's hard to imagine it taking a better edge than White steel!  On the other hand, Mark told me the Whites are unclad mono-steel...I'm sure they'll patina from being looked at!

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Phaedrus,

 

Point taken, their probley is white steel getting a patina in the box!

 

I have 2 white steels already, both are the Tojiro shirogami. They were reactive but they patinad rather quickly. They taken a wonderful edge and the retention is pretty good.

 

Is it fair to assume most white steels will react alike? I understand that the forging and production will affect the preformance qualities ( hardness, edge retention, etc ) but will the steel still have similar qualities w/ regard to a patina ?

 

If my patina assumption is sound than they present no more issues than I currently live with both the Tojiros, Kikuchi or Fujiwara carbons.

 

Still I'm curious, which is better?

post #4 of 10

White #2 isn't nearly as reactive as the steel Misono uses in its Sweden series, or as non-reactive as AS.  It's MOR for carbon in that sense; and doesn't discolor in the box, the drawer, or the glare of your beady eyes. 

 

You can allow a patina, force a patina, or prevent a patina (cleaning with baking soda every couple of weeks) -- it doesn't matter.   There's no right way to do it, just whatever you want.  Patina isn't much of an issue. 

 

HD Konosukes get as sharp (at least within my limits) as White #2 Konosukes.  HD's not quite as hard, 61RCH as opposed to 63, which doesn't make any difference as far as I can tell.   Surprisingly HD feels as good on the stones as carbon.  If you haven't used a high end laser, either will get sharp beyond your wildest dreams.

 

HD costs about 30% more. 

 

The reason I bought HD instead of White #2 is because I write so much about better stainless knives and didn't own one.  I wanted something which wouldn't rust so as not to feel like a hypocrite.   My Konosuke HDs are a lot better than I expected, but are no better than Konosuke carbons. 

 

If price is a big issue, the carbons are a much better deal, provided you're a carbon type of person.  If you're not, saving $90 (or whatever), is unlikely to change the habits of a lifetime. 

 

From a performance standpoint they're equal.  White #2 is a better deal if you're willing to put up with carbon neediness -- rinse and wipe every time before you put the knife down --  and if you don't use the knife exclusively for making lemonade out of the lemons life gives you. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 12/13/11 at 8:12am
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

I believe your underestimating the power of my beedy eyes!! although my wifes says I always overestimate that particular qaulity!

 

Point taken with the carbon. I currently use old Dexter Chefs knives both in 8" as well as 12"(vintage 1960's-great knives still by the way) as well as Fujiwara, Kikuchi and Sab.carbons. My habits are already formed around carbon and they present no issues.

 

Just for sh;ts and giggles, Any comparable blue steel lasers you suggest looking at ? Or god forbid the mysterious white steel #1. I understand Jon Broida seems to be the white #1 advocate lurking arouns here.

 

I enjoy your blog by the way.

 

Keep Sharp my Friend,

V Lou Tay

post #6 of 10

You should definitely talk to Jon.  He knows knives like practically no one else, and has a selection well suited to your interests.  He'll set you up with something great.  As an FYI, his recommendation was the final straw pushing me over to Konosuke HD.  A really nice, knowledgeable guy, who happens to love the knife business.

 

BDL

post #7 of 10

I do like white #1 a lot... but its not always the best choice for everyone.  Likewise, there arent too many white #1 lasers out there (in fact, i cant think of any production ones off the top of my heard... i've done a few customs though).  Here's the thing about it.... it takes a GREAT edge.  Edge holding is good, but not great... so its cool if you sharpen regularly.  However, it comes at the cost of being more brittle, so its difficult to make into a super thin knife for that reason.  Every time you see white #1 gyutos, they are usually clad and a bit thicker.  This helps with the brittle nature.  Awesome for single bevel knives though (due to the different techniques used in them).

 

Also @BDL Konosuke white #2 is 61-62 hrc... hd is approx 61.  Its pretty much the same.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by V lou tay View Post

I believe your underestimating the power of my beedy eyes!! although my wifes says I always overestimate that particular qaulity!

 

Point taken with the carbon. I currently use old Dexter Chefs knives both in 8" as well as 12"(vintage 1960's-great knives still by the way) as well as Fujiwara, Kikuchi and Sab.carbons. My habits are already formed around carbon and they present no issues.

 

Just for sh;ts and giggles, Any comparable blue steel lasers you suggest looking at ? Or god forbid the mysterious white steel #1. I understand Jon Broida seems to be the white #1 advocate lurking arouns here.

 

I enjoy your blog by the way.

 

Keep Sharp my Friend,

V Lou Tay



 

post #8 of 10

Are the HDs and the Whites identical save for the steel?  That's one thing I've been really curious about.  The HDs are very nice with regards to stiction; stuff doesn't stick to the blade much.  I wonder if the Whites have the same convexity and geometry?

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #9 of 10

yup... same for the stainless

post #10 of 10

Thank, JB!  Great info for me.  Maybe after Xmas I'll add another on to the stable.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
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