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Butterfly but no stuffing?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

After experimenting with roasting a pork butt I've decided that I'll be serving it for Christmas dinner.  The elegant pork butt thread was immensely helpful and I'll be using French Fries' method with my own flavorings.  Thread here: http://www.cheftalk.com/t/67835/elegant-pork-butt-dinner

 

It was cooked beautifully but I have further questions.  The inside of the meat wasn't seasoned at all and it really could use some seasoning.  I wonder if I could butterfly it and season it on the inside and then roll it up without a traditional stuffing.  I wouldn't mind putting something in there like an herb rub but I don't want breading or sausage of anything else that's bulky.  I can't recall ever having seen anything like this, is this a good idea?

 

I'll be serving it with a mustard gravy made with drippings, shallots, butter, lemon juice, grainy dijon and a touch of cream so the pork has to be flavored respectfully.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 9

Yes, you can  do this in theory, Except that  you'd need a boneless butt. They're out there, Costco routinely sells them this way. But they they won't butterfly well as they're allready split open oddly. One end remains pretty intact and you could do it with that smaller end.

 

The other thing to watch out for is that the stuffing may become quite greasy as a butt has plenty of fat throughout it. So you might base the stuffing on something less likely to absorb fat as much, say nuts, dried fruit and that sort of thing. I can see pine nuts, dried apricots, rosemary, some lemon zest and garlic.

 

If you want to use a whole boneless butt, you could make a paste out of those ingredients and rub it all through the deboned part. Then for the intact par, make deep slites with a petty or boning knife and pack the slit with the paste. For some of the thicker deboned parts, a slit would be good there too. Tie it up and roast away.

 

Injection is something to consider as well. This would work better with a bone in roast.

 

Oops, I misunderstood your point about the stuffing. Well, I apologize.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

The inside of the meat wasn't seasoned at all and it really could use some seasoning.  I wonder if I could butterfly it and season it on the inside and then roll it up without a traditional stuffing.

 

Actually that's how I do it, I just didn't think of putting it in the instructions I guess. First of all I usually get a boneless pork butt, so it's already butterflied and rolled up. I usually make a rub out of thinly diced fresh sage, sometimes lemon zest, chopped or crushed garlic, coarse sea salt and black pepper. Sometimes rosemary instead of the sage. But you know what to do. wink.gif Then I actually keep the shoulder rolled up but I just go inside the slits with my fingers. Sometimes if there's a big chunk of meat without any slits nearby, I take a knife and make a deep slit, to insert some of the rub. 

 

If you want to do it with a bone-in butt without butterflying, just make a bunch of slits. Kinda like when I roast a leg of lamb, I keep it bone in, but make a dozen slits to insert whole garlic cloves. 

 

PS: I'm glad you liked the recipe and will be using for Xmas! Enjoy!! smile.gif

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

I buy a bone-in and debone it.  I've never butterflied but my butcher would do it.  You remember the gravy didn't turn out well because it got better?  I wonder if this new mustard gravy will be enough in the way of seasoning so that I don't have to butterfly the butt.  I'll make slits instead and insert seasoned garlic maybe.  Oh what to do.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 Oh what to do.

 

All I see is excuses to make the dish more than once. You know, to experiment!! biggrin.gif

 

You mention mustard. Another wet rub I use sometimes with pork shoulders is dijon mustard emulsified with oil. Eggless mayo if you want to call it that. Add herbs, garlic, S&P to the mustard, then emulsify with olive oil, and completely cover the shoulder with it. Roast as usual. 
 

If you bone the shoulder, you've pretty much butterflied it, haven't you? You're left with a somewhat shapeless kinda flat rectangle of meat, no? Then you can rub it all over, then you roll it up and tie it, and you're done. 

 

I don't like gravy. I love jus. Jus is more concentrated meat flavors. Bernard Loiseau took the art of jus to the extreme, making jus by deglazing the pan with water only. If you try it, you'll see you're left with only the flavor of the caramelized meat, but in a liquid form. After that, you can die. licklips.gif

 

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

All I see is excuses to make the dish more than once. You know, to experiment!! biggrin.gif

 

You mention mustard. Another wet rub I use sometimes with pork shoulders is dijon mustard emulsified with oil. Eggless mayo if you want to call it that. Add herbs, garlic, S&P to the mustard, then emulsify with olive oil, and completely cover the shoulder with it. Roast as usual. 
 

If you bone the shoulder, you've pretty much butterflied it, haven't you? You're left with a somewhat shapeless kinda flat rectangle of meat, no? Then you can rub it all over, then you roll it up and tie it, and you're done. 

 

I don't like gravy. I love jus. Jus is more concentrated meat flavors. Bernard Loiseau took the art of jus to the extreme, making jus by deglazing the pan with water only. If you try it, you'll see you're left with only the flavor of the caramelized meat, but in a liquid form. After that, you can die. licklips.gif

 


Haha so would that be your last meal then?  Mustard and pork go well together.

 

I'm of 2 minds about jus.  First of all I'll that I do like it.  However, it has to be served right.  At a family gathering where I serve things family style and various things go on a plate I prefer gravy because it stays where you put it without leaking into every other piece of food.  I have nice little ramekins for jus when I serve jus.  But I'm one of those people that doesn't want meat jus in my side dishes so most of the time if a jus bowl is not offered I decline on jus which makes me sad.

 

This mustard gravy is more like a sauce really.  It goes so terribly well with the pork you should try it sometime.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

But I'm one of those people that doesn't want meat jus in my side dishes


Aaaaah the jus in the mashed potatoes! That's all my childhood right there!! :) But ok maybe it wouldn't work as well with other side dishes... although in general I do like it: leg of lamb jus all over the onions that were cooked in the roasting pan? Hmmmmmm.... Yummy!

 

Having said that jus is always served in a saucière at my home. 

 

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So please do share: how do you make your mustard-sauce? 

 

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

How bit is the saucier, is it passed or served on the plate?  If you go to a nice steak house and order a prime rib dinner it will usually be served with a small bowl or ramekin filled with jus.  The diner has the option of either dipping their meat into it or pouring it over their plate.  I appreciate that.  Unless the meat is served completely alone on the plate or with potatoes (which I agree with you, are fabulous with jus or gravy), I don't want the jus all over the plate.  I don't want jus on my peas for instance and let's face it, at a family dinner there are going to be side items on your plate, possibly even salad.

 

Okay, the mustard sauce is really good.  I don't have measurements, I just add ingredients by feel.  I use the drippings but pour off the fat.  In the pan put a little butter and sweat a chopped shallot and some thyme until soft and translucent.  Add a good bit of dijon mustard, either smooth or grainy or both depending on what you like.  Add lemon juice and deglaze with chicken stock.  Season and reduce to desired consistency.  Turn off the heat and add a touch of cream.  Serve as is or strain it.  When making a day ahead leave out the cream and add it when you warm up the gravy.  I don't know if I'd call it a gravy though, it's more like a sauce.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 9

The saucier can hold... maybe about a cup of jus? There's only one and it's placed in the center of the table, passed around to guests after they've been served the meat and sides. Salad is never served along with hot items, it is sometimes served before, more often served after, usually by itself. There is, however, one exception, and it is with "Sauteed fried potatoes". I'm not sure how else to call them, it's when you cut potatoes in a large dice (3/4 to 1 inch cube), put some oil and a LOT of duck fat in a pan, heat super hot, and fry the potatoes in it. They end up almost like cubed french fries kindof. Then salad is served in the same plate along with the potatoes. And in that case you're right I wouldn't want jus anywhere near my salad, but I don't think we've ever served meat with jus along with fried potatoes and salad. 

 

Thanks for the description of the mustard sauce. I often do something like that but with white wine instead of chicken stock because I never have enough chicken stock in hand. I'll have to try with chicken stock though, I'm sure the consistency is much better. 

 

Just the other night my wife came home with pork chops and fennel bulbs. Usually I would sautee thinly sliced fennel with a bit of lemon and parmesan cheese, but this time I wanted something different, so I got inspired by that pork butt/onion/lemon recipe you linked to. First I rendered some of the fat from the chops, then I quartered the fennel bulbs and colored them in the fat, added some lemon juice and a small amount of honey, carmelized the fennel some more, covered the pan and placed it in the oven until the fennel was very tender. It was beautiful, nicely golden brown and very tender, I thought it was very good, although next time I'll try with even less honey (maybe just a teaspoon for the 3 bulbs) and a bit more lemon. 

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