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Regarding Cooking Oil

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I love hashbrowns so I cook them often, it appears though that almost every 5th/10th time, I end up getting hot cooking oil in my eye. It actually just happened about 30 min ago. This isn't a first aid question since I've seen a doctor for this 3-4 times and every time they say it looks fine, etc. and it feels better in 2-3 days. I've tried lowering the heat but then it takes a lot longer to cook. I am only putting these pans over medium heat on a gas stove. I've tried changing pans (I'm currently using a Gordon Ramsay signature brand pan). His pans are great in fact it was the first time I've used them and it appears the oil still splashes so I know it's not the pan.

 

I'm using olive oil from trader joe's imported from Italy most of the time. Grapeseed oil seems to splash less. The doctor even said that it's extremely rare for oil to splash directly into the eye but I seem to be getting that lucky. It's not really bubbling like mad either it just gets hot, lets out a few pops and a tiny droplet will fly out and hit me square in the eye no matter how close or far I am from the pan. I'm also 6'3 so could height have anything to do with this?

 

Anyone else get hot oil in the eye? Any help would be appreciated.

post #2 of 5

safety glasses/goggles would be simple.

 

For hash browns, you shouldn't need that much oil. That's more like latke to swim in that much oil that it will pop.Use less to start and and just a bit as you flip them if needed. Your body will thank you for the lower fat content.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 5

Are your potatoes dry when you put them in?

 

That sort of splattering usually is the result of a pocket of moisture coming in contact with hot oil. Most often, but not always, it's surface moisture. So, in addition to lowering the amount of oil, try drying the spuds before adding them.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the advice. I'll definitely try the drying method and reducing the amount of oil. I do tend to put a lot in since I like mine extra crispy. The ones I use are from trader joe's and come frozen so with that moisture idea, it seems that the moisture from the hashbrowns being frozen may be part of it.

post #5 of 5

Hash browns are pretty easy to make and fresh is better than frozen. Peel and grate the potato. Either soak the grated potatoes in a couple changes of cold water or rinse thoroughly until the water coming out of the potatoes is clear. You'll need to agitate the potatoes a bit to get them to rinse evenly.

 

Shake out excess water and then pile the grated potatoes in some paper towels.  Fold the towel around the potatoes and wring out the mass of grated potatoes. A normal kitchen towel will work better for this but potato juice can stain pretty easily too.

 

I like to cook them in about a tablespoon of butter seasoned with salt and pepper. When I flip them, I add some more butter for the other side.

 

 

 

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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