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I've often gotten myself in trouble by pointing out that fads and trends often bear little relationship to reality. Chefs, foodies, and home cooks jump on a bandwagon, and make proclaimatons about it that bear little basis in fact. You've heard them, I'm sure. Things like how farm-raised salmon tastes differently than wild, etc. God forbid you should say anything that runs counter to those claims.

 

San Marzano tomatoes have been one of my favorite examples. First off, there are several varieties that have San Marzano in their name. And, second of all, despite what all the celebrity chefs insist, they are not particularly better than, and not as good as, many other plum type tomatoes. But, by God, if you want to be part of the in crowd you better be using and promoting them as the best.

 

And I offered good money to anyone who, in a blind taste test, could tell San Marzanos from, say Hunts, in a blind taste test. Naturally, there were never any takers.

 

Now comes a notice from Italy's San Marzano tomato consortium (Consorzio San Marzano) reporting that at least 95% of the San Marzano tomatoes sold in America aren't. Among other give-aways: San Marzano tomatoes carry DOP protection, and the can should say so, and carry a consorzio code number as well. In addition, real San Marzano tomatoes are only packed whole & peeled. They are never canned as sauce, puree, dice, chopped, or otherwise processed.

 

So, Tyler, and Michael, and Mario, etc. Just what have we been eating all these years that you've been touting San Marzano as the best? And, before creating the next "the is the only way to go" trend, you might make sure that we're actually getting what you say we should. And that it tastes differently from other kinds.

 

In other words, maybe it would be a good idea to learn what you're talking about before opening your mouth.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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