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Wusthof - Looking to buy a set but want the lightest set - any suggestions?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I am new to this forum.  I am a stay-at-home mom (daughter of a chef and family members own restaurants) and I am looking to buy a really, really good block set of knives. I am leaning towards the Wusthof brand. Does anyone here own mid-priced (up to $400) block set of Wusthof's are are really happy with them.  I personally like a lightweight knife.  I have small hands and if the knife is too heavy it's not good for me. Any advice and suggestions would be appreciated.  I am limited to the stores near me where I can actually go out and hold the knifes since they don't carry a large display or you can't take them out of their boxes to look at.  I will be buying online so I need to know which type would work best for me in terms of weight. I would also like a nice comprehensive set (w/ a Santoku - which is my favorite type of knife).  Also if anyone can guide to me where to buy - that would be awesome.  Thanks for any and all replies. 

post #2 of 8

OK. I'm not gonna give you any "knife" recommendations. There are more than enough others for that. I will however, recommend these two(2) retailers. You get the best (probably) prices and fantastic customer service. I don't think anyone would argue that. Here you go. Seasons Greetings, Happy Holidays. Enjoy. 

 

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http://www.chefknivestogo.com/

 

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http://www.cutleryandmore.com/cutlery.htm

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #3 of 8

I'll play.  Here's my two cents.  None of the German forged knives will be particularly light.  They just aren't.  Just a feature of their construction.  You should consider Japanese knives if you want lighter knives.  They will typically get sharper and hold an edge longer as well.  I own both, including a bunch of Wusthofs acquired over the years before Japanese knives become more commonly available.

 

That said, if you really want German knives, I would suggest considering Messermeister Meridian Elite rather than Wusthof, if for no other reason than that they don't have a finger guard bolster which interferes with sharpening.  Wusthof used to make the Le Cordon Bleu line which did not have a finger guard bolster, but it has been discontinued, although scattered pieces may still be available. 

 

I expect others will eventually jump in here with a variety of recommendations.  Lots of different recommendations.  You may want to do a bit of reading here as well to see what others have considered when searching for knives and knife sets.  As you might have guessed, yours is not an uncommon question.  My impression is that the recent trend in knife use by pros and the food obsessed has largely been towards the lighter, sharper Japanese knives which have a French profile, rather than the heavier German knives.  Then there are other issues to consider, such as stainless versus carbon steel, and how you intend to address sharpening and honing.

 

You may also want to rethink whether you really need a matched block set.  In most cases, you are paying for a number of knives that will see little use when you buy such a block set.  You may want to spend your money on fewer, better knives that you will actually use.  In addition, it isn't often the case that a single maker will make the "best" knife in every particular category.  The Wusthof bread knife, for example, typically costs more and is inferior to a Mac or Tojiro bread knife (I own both Wusthof and Tojiro bread knives).  I'm generally not thrilled with traditional Japanese boning knives and am perfectly happy with Forschner boning knives, which are inexpensive and perform very well (I own both Wusthof and Forschner boning knives).  YMMV.

 

I do use a large Wusthof chef's knife, but its use is limited to rough work, like splitting hard squash, chickens (when I don't use a Chinese cleaver) or when I'm likely to be working around bones.  Otherwise, I usually use a J knife or a Sabatier carbon petty for most tasks.  I also have a number of inexpensive paring knives, because I view them as largely disposable.  They get used for all kinds of inappropriate household tasks, get damaged, get lost, etc.  Easier and less painful to simply replace them when necessary.  Forschners work well for that purpose.  Get the rosewood handles if you want them to look nicer.  IMHO, mixing and matching knives from different makers will likely give you a better performing set of knives, more cost effectively, than buying a completely matched set from any single maker.  If you want all your knives to match for a consistent look, then that is a trade off you need to make (and there is nothing wrong with that - aesthetics count as well).

 

Finally I would second the vendor recommendations Ice Man has made.  I've bought knives and other kitchen gear from both those vendors and had great service, great pricing and rapid shipping.


Edited by pohaku - 12/28/11 at 1:08pm
post #4 of 8

OK. Well it's been a week or so, and not much response from the geeks. I guess I'll try and help out here. Look at the Wusthof Gourmet Knives. It's their lightest and least expensive line. CKtG has a 14-pc set for $230 that doesn't suck. For me however, I would go wit individual pieces. I didn't look very hard, but it seems that CKtG only has this one set, and doesn't have them individually. A simple phone call will answer that. 

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/wugo10piset.html

 

Now C&M has a number of sets and individual knives. I would go with individual knives. 

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthofgourmet.htm

 

Each place sells wood blocks, and so does Target (+/-$10). If it's for me, I'd put together these two(2) sets and be happy. It comes out to five(5) usable knives (in my opinion) for $170. I'd have no problem adding a couple-3 more knives to those, but that is a personal thing. As an example, I like using a nakiri for cutting up vegetables. A thin fillet knife and a good long slicer would be very nice usable additions. Those three(3) knives at $190, bring the total up to $360. That's less than your suggested $400. I think you could be very happy with that set-up. 

 

Wusthof Gourmet Starter Knife Set

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Wusthof Gourmet Asian Knife Set

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #5 of 8

To the extent she had any, the OP essentially answered her own questions.  She knew she wanted Wusthof, that she wanted their lightest line, how much she wanted to spend, and how many knives she wanted in the set.  Since she hasn't come back with any questions, presumably she used a search engine and found the answer to her dreams.

 

They're decent knives, and while not what I'd choose I'm not going to recommend them or rain on her parade by talking about options.  Unless someone who asks about an inclusive matched set seems amenable to having her mind changed, I keep mum. 

 

The usual lecture on sharpening probably wouldn't do much good. 

 

There really wasn't -- and isn't -- anything left to say worth saying beyond recommending CKtG and cutleryandmore. 

 

BDL

post #6 of 8

BDL very well said.

 

I have to admit that I have found very similar decisions myself when discussing options to the popular German knife block sets with those who have their hearts set on them.

 

We do have to be honest with ourselves that many were once very happy with their previous western knives, and until being "enlightened" by the sharpness and edge retention of good quality Japanese knives we had no idea either.

 

As an example I have both family and friends who were actually shocked by the sharpness of my knives, but once back home in their comfort zones etc they only continue to add to their current set,.

 

Sort of like the story about the horse, water, and not drinking it etc.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #7 of 8

Perfectly understandable.  I debated for awhile before posting in this thread as I had just had a similar conversation with my brother in law who was looking at buying a block set of knives for my niece for Christmas and made the mistake of asking my advice.  He was looking at Wusthof or Henckels of course.  In fact he gave us our first "good" knives when we got married 34 years ago.  Wusthof.  We still have and use them.

 

I've found the easiest approach to converting the unwashed is to give them a J knife.  First one's free you know!  It's all downhill from there.

 

I gave him a J knife for Christmas.

post #8 of 8

 

Quote:
It's all downhill from there

Oh boy your not kidding rollsmile.gif

 

Only negative result I have seen is that I end up having a few extra knives to sharpen, but that is not completely a negative either.

 

 

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
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