New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Garnishing ideas

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

After skulking around for a few months on here I thought I'd say hello and ask for some ideas at the same time.

 

I have never liked garnishing food with a sprig of parsley or a mint leaf, I believe that all garnishes should add something to the dish, and of course be edible.

I run a busy kitchen which caters for large banqueting numbers, usually a plated roast or a piece of grilled fish - along with potatoes and veggies. Garnishing the fish dishes is quite straightforward, grilled asparagus is something I use quite a lot of, but it is the roasts that are causing me headaches.

 

I am of course short staffed so can't spare anyone for huge amounts of time prepping anything too fancy, but need something that is quick to put on to the plate - not too messy and will look and taste good,

 

Any thoughts would be welcomed

 

Peter

post #2 of 9

Steaks and such you can always do a Poached/Steamed Mushroom Stuffed with Carmelized onions for example or anything for that matter and a sprig of rosemary stabbed in the top just to look cool.... If you want to do something to the mushrooms like pop a star or some other design into each of them using the tip of a paring knife and some pressure it always looks cool if you dont want to stuff them... Use a zester to peel long thin strands of straight horseradish root is always nice looking to... That or even Flash fried herbs in the deep fryer like Basil, Parsley, or Rosemary work wonders as well... Spinach if you dont want to waste money on Basil for 100 geusts on a banquet... Compound Butters also can add a lot of color to a dish for garnish if they are made right.. They dont have to overpower the dish you can just add things to them for color and hell what steak isnt good without regular butter? Then you can always brush your plates with a pastry brush or spoon with thicker sauces to paint the plate.... or just take a good old mixture of parsley, red pepper flakes, maybe some blackening spice and mix them togethers then get yourself a nice little pat of butter whatever size 1/2" x 1/2" is good then brush it on your plate and sprinkle your colorful mixture down then blow the excess off youve got a nice little sprinkle garnish that sticks as well and can be done ahead of time without risk of it getting messed up or blown off... Hope this helps..

post #3 of 9

When I first got into a kitchen, I was putting fruit carvings with everything lol. Then I started using real flowers, leafs, etc. It was because I thought it looked so cool, and because I could do it and others I worked with couldn't I simply did it as a way to show off. Now I won't do either. It looks super tacky to me.  If you're going to do a fruit tray, then of course those things will compliment the tray itself and go good with it. 

 

It all comes down to taste. Don't put something on a dish that wouldn't go with what you're serving. Strawberry roses with steak. Edible orchid flowers with an Indian cuisine inspired dish. 

 

As another chef has said in this thread, you could use something such as a mushroom for garnish. 

 

knifeskillsimage53.jpg

 

It's something simple, that may go with your dish, compliment different ingredients, and is art on its own. Think of it like this. Take all of your ingredients in your dish and ask yourself, how can I change the shape of that and compliment the dish? Maybe julienne some different colored peppers and let them soak in ice water so they curl up. Or maybe change the shape of a potato such as making it into a cylinder, or cubes with a ball inside (google it). 

 

Every time you change the shape and texture of food, it is no longer the same. It will cook differently, and maybe even taste different depending on the way you incorporate it. So always take that into consideration. You may want say a fish and chips dish to look more unique. You may want potato seaweed. So you fry off some Latkes. It now looks cool, but you've changed the taste too. 

 

Sauces. I can think of so many different variations to apply sauces so it looks unique. 

 

I've moved on from garnishes for the most part. I let the food speak for itself by the way it is presented on a plate and what else is on the dish complimenting it. 

post #4 of 9

Cookers....those caps are beautiful. I had a French Chef teach me how to make those and after I made them a few times I was asked to make them for every plated banquet. I regret that day. 

post #5 of 9

Yeah Asparagus and pepper curls are great for garnish as well..

post #6 of 9

A simple radish. Do them up ahead of time, stick them in ice water.....

I make these alot and they can make a nice garnish and can be used all year long.

 

radish.jpg(pic off net)

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 9

Use the ends of your green onions and make flowers, classic chopped parsley, tomato rose, wrap a bundle of herbs in a green onion strip, lemon rose, orange flower, julienne fennel and then fry it is always nice. To save time ask your vendor about micro greens and edible flowers. I am sure you could also get in some micro onions or baby veggies. A fine brunois of mire poix also works nice 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Cookers....those caps are beautiful. I had a French Chef teach me how to make those and after I made them a few times I was asked to make them for every plated banquet. I regret that day. 



Lol please do not give me any credit for those. I know how to make them and I'm decent at it, but that is an example picture from the internet :)

post #9 of 9

There are many good books on assorted garnishes for plates and platters. One is How to Garish by Harold Rosen another Book of Buffets  George Waldner I believe CIA published it as George taught there many years. I get ideas from magis like Good Housekeeping etc. Even  the potato itself(red bliss) can be carved into mushroom shapes and served with the roast or steak. Its not hard.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs