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The very best Omelette recipes? - Page 2

post #31 of 40

KK

I don't know about ChrisB's version, but I put the ramekins into a shallow waterbath when I'm using ramekins in the oven (simply cos my Mum did it that way, I think!)  and a deeper saucepan on the hob when making coddled eggs in the china coddlers. 

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post



... No water bath is needed?  And assuming that it will take about 15 minutes to cook the egg yet maintain a runny yolk, how do I test to make sure the egg is ready?



You could use a waterbath, but it isn't really necessary. It's a little tricky to test for doneness. Simply tap on the floating yolk with your indexfinger and feel how it is.

From my experience (and my oven) the timing of 15 minutes is right when not using a waterbath. 20 minutes if you don't like runny yolks.

 

@Ishbel, yeah that's true, I forgot there are some very posh pots available designed for this.

post #33 of 40

I used to work a breakfast buffet station at a golf resort where I'd make millions of omelettes in front of guests.  I had 4 8" carbon steel pans, and a silicon spatula.  Guests would choose their fillings which I would saute in the pan, then add the beaten eggs right on top of the filling.  As it cooked I'd "bleed" each omelette, flip to cook for a split second, and flip back so the filling is back on the inside.  Add cheese and simultaniously fold and transfer the omelette to a plate.

 

That's how I'll always make them I expect as its crazy fast and clean, impressive to watch, and can yield a custardy melt in your mouth omelette without any browning.

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post



You could use a waterbath, but it isn't really necessary. It's a little tricky to test for doneness. Simply tap on the floating yolk with your indexfinger and feel how it is.

From my experience (and my oven) the timing of 15 minutes is right when not using a waterbath. 20 minutes if you don't like runny yolks.

 

@Ishbel, yeah that's true, I forgot there are some very posh pots available designed for this.


I didn't use a waterbath.  I baked 2 eggs, one in each ramekin.  I may have used a little too much butter.  The yolk was a little bit more stiff than I'd like but otherwise it was very tasty although my goodness was it rich!  The cheese, the butter, the cream!!  I'll go a little lighter handed next time because it's definitely worth making again.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #35 of 40

As I said, coddled eggs were always a favourite invalid food when my family were young!

 

Glad you enjoyed them, though!

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


I didn't use a waterbath.  I baked 2 eggs, one in each ramekin.  I may have used a little too much butter.  The yolk was a little bit more stiff than I'd like but otherwise it was very tasty although my goodness was it rich!  The cheese, the butter, the cream!!  I'll go a little lighter handed next time because it's definitely worth making again.

 



Each oven is different, so your try-out is the better reference in timing the cooking.

Mostly there's only 1 egg per pot, it's indeed very, very rich. This was mostly served as a starter and in some more fortunated households,

after baking, a little caviar went on top!

 

post #37 of 40

Hi Petals,

I agree, Jacque Pepin may be one of the best TV chefs ever.  I didn't like to watch him when he first appeared, though because he'd use ingredients that just were not available in your local grocery at that time.  But since then, our suppliers have gone crazy and you can get nearly anything Jacque ever used.

 

I intended to buy his book about the cooking of his home growing up.  He made a beautiful fulffy egg casserole on Sara Mounton's old show.  I looked devine.  he also made deviled eggs and then turned them face down in the pan and browned them.  I don't even care for deviled eggs, but those looked great.

 

Thanks for the video, JimCuda

post #38 of 40

Very cool.

It is Jacque Pepin and I will not question his work or dispute his expertise, we all do things differently and classic is classic.  But...

if he were working in my kitchen I would tell him to keep that metal fork out of my omelette pan!

post #39 of 40

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyGal View Post
I intended to buy his book about the cooking of his home growing up.  He made a beautiful fulffy egg casserole on Sara Mounton's old show.  I looked devine.  he also made deviled eggs and then turned them face down in the pan and browned them.  I don't even care for deviled eggs, but those looked great.


His recipe for those browned deviled eggs is in that very book, The Apprentice, which is not so much about "the cooking of his home" but about his apprenticeship and his early to middle career as a professional chef. It's an extremely good book.

 

Although that recipe is in the book, as I say, it's pretty straightforward. Hard-boil your eggs (properly: cold eggs, pierced fat ends, into boiling water and then held at a gentle simmer for 10 minutes, dump the water and cover the eggs with ice water and let cool for at least 15-20 minutes). Peel, cut in half lengthwise, remove yolks to a bowl. Mash with mayonnaise, vinaigrette, minced shallots, fresh herbs, whatever seems appropriate. The mixture should be soft but not runny. Put it back in the whites. Heat a well-seasoned or nonstick pan to medium-high. Add oil. When hot put the eggs in, yolk down, and push down gently to flatten a bit. Remove after a few minutes when the yolks are golden brown, and serve immediately. It's delicious.

post #40 of 40

Quote:

Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
I've never made eggs en cocotte, I may want to try this today for lunch.  No water bath is needed?  And assuming that it will take about 15 minutes to cook the egg yet maintain a runny yolk, how do I test to make sure the egg is ready?


A water bath is a good idea, though as Chris says, not entirely necessary. The problem is that in many ovens, dependent on how air circulates, the outside will end up rubbery-hard before the center is hot -- not really set, but hot. A water bath solves this problem.

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