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Does anyone have a Caesar Salad recipe without using anchovies for the sauce?

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 

I was told that you can make the salad and dressing without any anchovies by using something called Worcestershire Sauce instead. Being french I have no idea what that is or how to make it. Could anyone give me a good recipe? Me and my fiancee love Caesar Salads but she hates fish. Thanks! :)

post #2 of 38

Probably most recipes are trade secrets, the one I use is http://www.leaperrins.com/

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post #3 of 38

When I was in Germany decades back, you could find it in small bottles. Always the Lea and Perrins brand.

 

Allegedly, Worcestershire sauce was what was used in the original Ceasar salad instead of anchovies. But Worcestershire sauce has some anchovies in the ingredients list.  Don't worry, doesn't taste fishy at all.

 

Quite often, anchovies just provide a salty savory umami flavor base to a dish, which I think they do in Ceasar dressing. It doesn't taste fishy to me either.

post #4 of 38

As in Ceasar dressing, anchovies are more used to provide a salt element than a fishy one. Many recipes call for it.

 

Here in the States, many people say they don't like anchovies, cuz their first exposure is as whole filets laid on a pizza. But these same people love Ceasar salad, and use Wocestershire Sauce as a basic condiment. They're shocked when you point out that the do like anchovies, they just didn't know that they liked them.

 

The two ingredients that give Wocestershire Sauce it's unique flavor, btw, are anchovies and tamerind. It was originally devised, in the early 19th century, as an attempt to replicate a similar product used in India.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 38

If you really just can't get past the idea that there is fish in worcestershire sauce, you can go this direction and be OK. I myself personally would rather use the regular stuff (Lee&Perrins is as good as any, but French's is cheapest), but I've used products like these before and never got any noise for it. 

 

Annie's Naturals Organic Vegan Worcestershire Sauce

 

The Wizard'sª Sauces Brand

 

 

If you'ld like to make your own, here, try this: 

 

2 cups apple-cider vinegar

1/2 cup soy sauce

1/4 cup light-brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground yellow mustard seed or dry mustard

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 clove garlic, crushed

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Place all ingredients in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; reduce heat to a simmer and cook until liquid is reduced by half, about 20 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve and let cool completely before using. Worcestershire sauce may be stored in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 3 months.

 

 

If you're feeling really enthusiastic, you can try this recipe: 

 

2 cups vinegar 

1⁄2 cup molasses

1⁄2 cup soy sauce

1⁄4 cup tamarind concentrate or 6 tbsp lemon juice)

3 tbsp yellow mustard seeds

3 tbsp salt

1 tsp black peppercorns

1 tsp whole cloves

1⁄2 tsp curry powder

5 cardamom pods, smashed

1 tsp red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1 1" stick cinnamon

1 onion, chopped

1 1⁄2" piece ginger, peeled and crushed

1⁄2 cup sugar

 

1. Mix all the ingredients other than the sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.

2. Heat sugar until it caramelizes and becomes an amber syrup.

3. Mix together with the other ingredients, whisking well.

4. Cook for 5 minutes more.

5. Transfer to a container.

6. Refrigerate for 3 weeks.

7. Strain out the solids, and then return to the container.

 
Good luck. Enjoy whatever you chose. 
 

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post #6 of 38

IceMan, have you made both of those? I would guess, from the ingredients, that the second would be closer in taste to Wocester???

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 38

 

 

1921 Caesar Salad without Anchovies ...

 

Firstly, the gent who invented this salad in 1921, César Cardini was from Tijuana, Mexico according to Le Cordon Bleu Research.

 

One can substitute Black Kalamata Olives should you wish to have the Salty included. Here is the original recipe of César Cardini:

 

For 4 to 5:

 

Ingredients:

 

2 large eggs

1 Lettuce Rumanian Style

* Bread Croutons which I prepare however, one can buy pre-made

50 ml  Extra virgin olive oil

35g Aged Italian Parmesano Grated

2 tblsps Fresh parsley

*** optional for Salt flavour: Black Kalamata Olives ( equivalent to the weight of 4 anchovies ) 

 

The Dressing:

2 egg yolks

1 tblsp lemon juice fresh ( 1 Lemon )

130 ml Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 cloves minced garlic   

*** Optional: KY´s home made Lea and Perrins dressing without the preservatives   

 

1) beat 2 egg yolks and lemon juice in blender

2) Add by shotglass: Olive oil slowly blending until u have a smooth thick mixture ( sort of dip like )

3) Then, add the garlic, salt and pepper and more lemon juice to taste for a less thickened dressing if you wish to

4) wash and cut lettuce of choice in chunks

5) make your bread croutons ( let them cool on paper towels )

6) in a large bowl: collocate the lettuce, the dressing and rest of the ingredients before serving and the last items are to add the parmesano and fresh chopped parsley and then the croutons and Toss ...

 

*** it is quite common in the U.S.A.:  one can add a breast of chicken or duck as well

*** Also note: Lea and Perrins was not imported to Tijuana in1921

 

post #8 of 38

 

You have quite a nice repertoire of interesting concoctions Ky.  

 

I shall keep this in mind for Office Caesar Salad ...

 

 

post #9 of 38

Use the anchovies anyway and lie about it.  She'll never know the difference because it doesn't taste like fish at all. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 38


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Use the anchovies anyway and lie about it.  She'll never know the difference because it doesn't taste like fish at all. 



   Going in the same direction as Koukouvagia, i will often use anchovies paste when I know people will pass on a dish with whole anchovies.  It does a wonderful job in dressings, sauces and some soups.  No, I don't tell them.

 

Dan

post #11 of 38

You have quite a nice repertoire of interesting concoctions Ky.  

 

Not me, Margcata. The faux Wocestershire recipes were posted by IceMan. I just remarked that the second one would be closer in taste, based on the ingredients.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 38

Posted by Le Francais View Post

I was told that you can make the salad and dressing without any anchovies by using something called Worcestershire Sauce instead. Being french I have no idea what that is or how to make it. Could anyone give me a good recipe? Me and my fiancee love Caesar Salads but she hates fish. Thanks! :)


Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce is available in France.  In stores.  Being French is no longer a good excuse for not trying it, and my guess is that it's cheaper to buy than to make at home -- not to mention a helluva lot more convenient. 

 

Assuming that Cesar Cardini invented Caesar salad (he probably did, but it's not certain), the "original" Ceasar salad did not contain any anchovies.  However, many "classic" (old-school) Caesar salads.  Worcestershire sauce is not a substitute for anchovies in the sense of one or the other.  Worcestershire sauce is almost always a component, whether or not anchovies are used.

 

The salad first became popular in the western US in the mid-twenties, and by the fifties was well established throughout the country; it remains very popular.  Given it's longevity, as you might expect, there are a lot of variations.  Some of them, Gordon Ramsay's for instance, are complete travesties. 

 

As other people have already commented, beating mashed anchovies (or anchovy paste) into Caesar salad dressing does not make the dressing at all fishy.  Yes, the anchovy is salt enough so that you don't need additional salt, but salt is never a problem.   The real purpose in using anchovy is to add "fundament," or "bottom."  Something you might think of as "umami."  

 

Anchovy was a very common component of salad dressings at the time Caesar salads enjoyed their first popularity so it's not surprising that it worked its way in as a dressing component.  If you like, you may also use fillets of anchovy as a garnish.  I do, it's not uncommon, but it certainly is not mandatory.

 

FWIW, Cardini's (the restaurant) was not actually in Tijuana.  It was a roadhouse, just barely on the Mexican side of the border, on the way to Tijuana, that allowed SoCal Americans to drink during prohibition.  Whether or not Lea and Perrins was available in Tijuana at the time (and how would anyone know that it was not?), it was certainly available elsewhere and was certainly a part of Cardini's original (assuming he was the first).  But the idea here is not to recreate Cesar Cardini's, but to make the best Caesar salad possible.   I've eaten a lot of Caesar salads over the years, and have NEVER seen parsley until reading Margcata's recipe. 

 

Here's my recipe for a classic version.  It's based on the salad served at Nickodell's, once a Hollywood fixture.  If you try it, I guarantee your fiancee will not taste the anchovy.  Remember to taste before using to judge the power of the lemons.

 

I'm curious as to what's in your fiancee's and your current beloved Caesar salad.  Can you provide a recipe or at least a description?

 

BDL

 

 

 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 1/5/12 at 7:55am
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post #13 of 38

I pretty much I agree w/ you KYH, the second looks better. NO, I have not made either. For something as little used for me, and when used, even though it's a kinda key ingredient, is used in such a small amount, I just buy a bottle. OK, I'm lazy like that, buy I'll trade the work fore ease in instances like these. I included the two(2) recipes for the OP, in case there was any enthusiasm involved. 

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I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #14 of 38

to Le Francais:

 

In classic Caesar dressing should not Worcestershire sauce be missed, as well as anchovies, but you can make that basic dressing, just do not put anchovies in it. It will not be so significant without it, but it still will be tasty...:)

post #15 of 38

 

 

@ Iceman: Apologies. Like your Worecestershire dressings ... Nice. Have to try out ...

 

*** Worcestershire by Lea and Perrins was created in England off top of my head --- without going into the Kitchen ... and it is wonderful as an ingredient for a steak marinade for BBQ ...

 

*** Anchovy paste, yes, forgot about this --- as I live in Spain and I love anchovies --- however, the amount of anchovy paste certainly has NO fish taste whatsoever ... In agreement here, WHITE LIE !  There are top shelf anchovies in extra virgin olive oil and there are anchovies !  Spain´s Canatabrian Sea is the main exporter of this product. They are a key ingredient in Salad Nicoise as well as Caesar --- and Traditional Greek Salad with Feta ...  

 

They are served here as a Tapa with fresh moist white cheese ( cow ) called Burgos Cheese which is sort of a cross between a Ricotta and a Cow type Mozzarella or with a creamcheese spread topped with anchovies ... Tostas = canapes. One may also encounter blue cheese with anchovies !

 

 

post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MARGCATA View Post

 

 


 

*** Anchovy... They are a key ingredient in ..Traditional Greek Salad with Feta ...  

 



No.

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post #17 of 38

http://www.culinaryarts.com/Recipes/recipefiles/Caesar.htm

 

Omit the anchovy and season according to taste. The recipe tells you how to prepare it.

 

Petals.

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post #18 of 38

So many things would be the poorer without Worcester Sauce - including a Vodka and Tomato juice (sometimes I call it a bloody mary, but purists have very set ideas on what should go into mixed drinks!), a dash or two added to things like cottage pie or a beef casserole or a gravy can't be beaten, either!

post #19 of 38

Posted by petalsandcoco View Post


http://www.culinaryarts.com/Recipes/recipefiles/Caesar.htm

 

Omit the anchovy and season according to taste. The recipe tells you how to prepare it.



Just some thoughts...

 

I agree with "anchovies optional," but have a few issues with the "Culinary Arts" school recipe.  First, the lettuce should be torn and not cut with a knife.  Second, lettuce for a Caesar should not be chilled.  Caesar salads do not need to be particularly crisp and are best served room temp.

 

Personally, I ascribe to the "whole egg" school, and don't understand why you'd want to use yolks only.  Caesar dressing is already more than rich enough made with whole eggs.   

 

Finally, it's old school to use the garlic for a little oil and aroma only, then throw it out -- but it's also reminiscent of a time when people were afraid of garlic's taste and aroma; a time when women used a garlic press to keep the "odor" off their fingers; a time which is past.  Better to use finely chopped garlic, then to try and scent the dressing or the bowl.

 

BDL

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post #20 of 38

Garlic is also important for keeping Vampires and other such creatures away. They have a very nasty habit of skipping out on the check. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #21 of 38

I agree with all BDLs points. That's a retro recipe at best.

 

But even within that context, when did any professional chef cut the lettuce? Romaine is always torn.

 

I'm also a whole-egg guy. What purpose is served with yolks only? Coddling or poaching are more modern approaches, used by folks who are concerned about food safety. Personally, I think thy go overboard in that direction, and I don't hesitate to use raw eggs.

 

Although probably not authentic, I toss my croutons, while still warm, in grated Parmesan for additional flavor. And I mash the garlic and salt, to create a paste, so that the flavor fully enfuses into the other ingredients.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #22 of 38

imagesCAWR828M.jpg

                                                            "But even within that context, when did any professional chef cut the lettuce? Romaine is always torn."

I don't think I need to say more. As far as eggs or yolks go, everyone has their own recipe. I like it rich - with yolks

 

                                                             "but it's also reminiscent of a time when people were afraid of garlic's taste and aroma"

You just described my boss .

 

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post #23 of 38

Chef Petals, try my recipe and see if your boss likes it better than Culinary Arts.  I bet he does.

 

BDL 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 1/7/12 at 12:35pm
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post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Chef Petals, try my recipe and see if your boss likes it better than Culinary Arts.  I bet he does.

 

BDL 



 

   Hi BDL, Petals!

 

 

       BDL's caeser recipe was very good.  Of course, his recipes usually are tasty!  You should give it a try sometime :)

 

      yum!

 

Dan

post #25 of 38

Hello there,

 

Sorry for the delay in responding, I will definitely try the recipe. I enjoy garlic and bold flavors when the dish calls for it. At work it can be a challenge as he has never liked raw onions and garlic.

This is a man who walks around with tic tacs in his pocket for fear of offensive ordors coming from his breath. Smells (cooking aroma) he finds offensive as well.

 

When people walk into the house they are not suppose to smell anything according to him. The ventilation system throughout the house is incredible. I think he has a phobia to be honest.

 

It makes it difficult to cook certain things especially fish. I have taken to doing alot of the cooking in the very early morning and last minute prep to the end as usual.

 

I met his old cook in the Bah. and she said that they had to do just about all the cooking outside in a room off the kitchen which looks like a kitchen except closed off to the house. I am starting to complain which is not like me. Just trying to make the best of a situation that is not always easy.

 

If anyone knows me they could tell you that I love the smell of apple pie when I walk into a house, or guess what type of meal was being prepared by the aroma.......but I sometimes forget the fact that he was raised with all the fomalities of life and its sad in way  because there is just so much more to living .

 

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post #26 of 38

I was researching today about the purpose of anchovies in Caesar Salad & came upon an article written by Julia Child who had actually met the man who created the salad.  In the original version - there were NO ANCHOVIES but he used 6 drops of Wor. Sauce which is a common ingredient in the U.S.  You can find it here near the bar-b-q or marinade sauces.  It has the base flavor of anchoivy (so they say) but is a wonderful flavor in many of my recipes. 

post #27 of 38
1 qt Mayo
7 oz balsamic vinnegar (red) aged if possible
1.5 oz grapeseed oil
5oz wor.
S&P TT
Cayenne TT
1 clove fine mince garlic

Mix everything together with a whisk enjoy

Its not excellent but its good and verry easy
post #28 of 38

Really? Mayo? Cayenne? Balsamic? No Parmesan? No coddled egg? Interesting!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anime Shefu View Post


1 qt Mayo
7 oz balsamic vinnegar (red) aged if possible
1.5 oz grapeseed oil
5oz wor.
S&P TT
Cayenne TT
1 clove fine mince garlic
Mix everything together with a whisk enjoy
Its not excellent but its good and verry easy

Shows how much "out of date" I am!

 

BTW, never used anchovies in Caesar's Salad,  just a splash of Worcestershire sauce, preferably Lea & Perrins
 

 

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post #29 of 38

Many prepared (bottled) condiments and sauces already contain anchovy originally worstchester sauce was one, as was A1, Tiger sauce as well as others. I never put anchovy in my caesar dressing as most of places I worked in said hold the anchovy. If they did want anchovy, I crossed 2 on top of salad as garnish.

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post #30 of 38

I like anchovies in Caesar dressing, but have made it without also. I make a creamy style with 1 pint mayo, 1/4 cup each red wine vinegar and lemon juice, 1/4 cup or so grated parmesan cheese, 2 cloves crushed/ chopped fine garlic, coarse ground pepper to taste and I would add 1/2 tube anchovy paste to this, but you can just as well leave it out. This is one of those things (like Alfredo) that has evolved from what it originally was because everyone has their own take on it. Some people will swear the dressing has to be made with raw egg and others prefer the creamier version, which according to the "original" recipe posted earlier would be correct as they are basically making mayonnaise to start wth. I  have served this recipe a lot and people seem to like it. I have even made it with white wine. Make it how you like it if you're the one eating it.

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