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Food Network: The Big Waste - Page 3

post #61 of 122

MrMexico, if you have room at your restaurant you could build a small garden or two by using 2x10 or 2x12, to make a box and line the bottom with garden/flower bed fabric all the way up the sides, use a mixture of sand, fertilizer (the kind you get from cows and horses) and top or potting soil. plant some tomato's, cucumbers, peppers whatever you like and instead of making that the bulk of your dishes, feature what you grow as the star of a few special dishes you want to stand out. just a thought, hope it's something you can use.

post #62 of 122

 

Quote:
I would love to start a garden at my restaurant but it's exremely difficult because I'm on a floating dock.

What about rooftop gardening as an option?

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post #63 of 122

rick bayless has roof gardens, and essentially turned his back yard into a veg garden....it's beautiful.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #64 of 122

I've heard of quite a few large food producers developing rooftop gardens. Eli Zabar here in NY is doing it-growing a garden on the roof above his huge baking facility. The heat that rises from the ovens allows lots of veggies to be grown even when it's quite cold outside.

Bravo

 

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post #65 of 122

cold frame gardening is a beautiful thing!  easy and inexpensive as well. then there are 'grow domes' of varying sizes....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #66 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

This thread is making me anxious.  I went to a restaurant in DC this weekend and ordered a dish that was too horrible to eat.  But I didn't send it back because I didn't want to be wasteful.  So there I sat eating terrible food and then I paid for it.  Don't worry, I will yelp it.  How bad was it?  Let's just say velveeta was involved.


kk, 

while i'm the worst one for sending anything back to the kitchen it's not because of wastefulness but because of usually not wanting to upset a lovely evening. the exception is if something is raw that isn't suppose to be, like chicken. i usually just suffer quietly or drink more wine. i am, however, trying to change my tune now that it's a new year!  as customers we NEED to make the kitchen responsible and accountable for our food the way we ordered it. we order a certain dish in a certain way for certain reasons and with certain expectations and we trust that the kitchen will deliver on their promise to make it so.. it's one of the reasons we go out in the first place isn't it?, for someone to deliver on a promise to eat well without having to make it yourself. i expect nothing less from my customers..it's what keeps us on our toes and our edges sharp...

curious though, what was you you ordered?

joey

 

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #67 of 122

Hotel Chefs were doing rooftop gardening (herbs and micro-greens) in Vancouver since the mid 90's.

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post #68 of 122
Thread Starter 

Very true.  Yea it's not like she's gonna evict me haha

post #69 of 122
Thread Starter 

Same goes with a rooftop garden, it's not my building so I'd have to get permission from the marina manager.  Plus, it's not a flat roof, it's quite slanted and also a very crummy metal building.  Probably not ideal. 

post #70 of 122

disappointing thread I thought we were going to talk about how the food network is a waste

post #71 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post


kk, 

while i'm the worst one for sending anything back to the kitchen it's not because of wastefulness but because of usually not wanting to upset a lovely evening. the exception is if something is raw that isn't suppose to be, like chicken. i usually just suffer quietly or drink more wine. i am, however, trying to change my tune now that it's a new year!  as customers we NEED to make the kitchen responsible and accountable for our food the way we ordered it. we order a certain dish in a certain way for certain reasons and with certain expectations and we trust that the kitchen will deliver on their promise to make it so.. it's one of the reasons we go out in the first place isn't it?, for someone to deliver on a promise to eat well without having to make it yourself. i expect nothing less from my customers..it's what keeps us on our toes and our edges sharp...

curious though, what was you you ordered?

joey

 


I ordered shrimp with cheesy grits.  The shrimp were rubbery, floating in a pool of velveeta cheese.  I looked for the grits but there didn't seem to be any.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #72 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefjpauley View Post

disappointing thread I thought we were going to talk about how the food network is a waste


We've already figured that out.  lol.gif

 

post #73 of 122

The food waste in America doesn't bother me especially in restaurants.  This is simply a problem that capitalism solves.  Its in a person's or business's own interest to reduce waste or at the very least pass on the waste to the purveyors and vendors.  Its in the purveyors and vendors own interest to reduce or pass on waste through their prices, business practices, and shipping methods.  This is not exactly an epidemic.

post #74 of 122

it's not an epidemic YET!.... if it's not an epidemic now it soon will be...landfills being what they are and everything!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #75 of 122
Thread Starter 

@ Koukou...

 

That sounds terrible.  Just the words "shrimp" and "velvetta" make me quiver.  What a terrible combo...

post #76 of 122

 

Quote:
I ordered shrimp with cheesy grits.  The shrimp were rubbery, floating in a pool of velveeta cheese.  I looked for the grits but there didn't seem to be any.

Oooohhhhh! This PAINS me to the core!

My old friend, Bill Neal (now long gone) popularized the low country dish of Shrimp and Grits during the '80s. When made properly it is a true delight.

My hunky and I still make it for our Yankee friends when having company over.

What an abomination!

 

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post #77 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodnfoto View Post

 

Oooohhhhh! This PAINS me to the core!

My old friend, Bill Neal (now long gone) popularized the low country dish of Shrimp and Grits during the '80s. When made properly it is a true delight.

My hunky and I still make it for our Yankee friends when having company over.

What an abomination!

 



It truly was painful.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #78 of 122

Growing a Tower of Basil With Roofless, Rainwater-Harvesting Aquaponics

An innovative system funnels rainwater into a fish tank to feed a tower of basil. 

 

basil-towers-aquaponics-full-shot.png.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg basil-towers-aquaponics-rain-saucer.png.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg

 

 

 

 

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post #79 of 122



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by benway View Post

The food waste in America doesn't bother me especially in restaurants.  This is simply a problem that capitalism solves.  Its in a person's or business's own interest to reduce waste or at the very least pass on the waste to the purveyors and vendors.  Its in the purveyors and vendors own interest to reduce or pass on waste through their prices, business practices, and shipping methods.  This is not exactly an epidemic.


Uh... capitalism created fast food, convienience food, supermarkets, and franchises.  It also created packaging and advertising. 

 

My customers demand that I have attractive packaging for my chocolates, the (deleted)-ing box costs more than the chocolates. And it's still cheaper for me to get the boxes from China than locally.

 

I order butcher twine along with top rounds, grnd beef chubs, and primeribs.  Everything comes in a separate box.  Even the string.  Wtf?  even the string.

 

It won't get better untill it becomes cheaper to be more ecologically minded. Only when water becomes metered will people install low-flush toilets, and collect rainwater to water their lawns and gardens. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to deviate a downspout into a barrel  for collection, but no one does it because it's cheaper and easier to turn on a hose.
 

 

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post #80 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by benway View Post

The food waste in America doesn't bother me especially in restaurants.  This is simply a problem that capitalism solves.  Its in a person's or business's own interest to reduce waste or at the very least pass on the waste to the purveyors and vendors.  Its in the purveyors and vendors own interest to reduce or pass on waste through their prices, business practices, and shipping methods.  This is not exactly an epidemic.



Not an epidemic? at 50% waste in most cases what else would you call it, if a city, county, or state had an illness rate that high it would be a national emergency, if a computer company had a 50% failure rate it would go bankrupt, so if a farm waste half of its product and then a grocery store or food wholesaler waste even 10% of its product and restaurant waste as little as 20% of its product. do you see the problem and what it could mean for the nation as a whole, it could be the start an economic and health disaster of unimaginable proportions

 

post #81 of 122

 

Quote:

Not an epidemic? at 50% waste in most cases what else would you call it, if a city, county, or state had an illness rate that high it would be a national emergency

I think more in terms of what a crime it is, but Reverendfoodie what is the solution?

 

"You must be the change you want to see in the world."   --Mahatma Gandhi

 

Next time when shopping, take Gandhi's quote along. It is a powerful mirror.

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post #82 of 122

cheflayne your right, it is a crime. but to overcome the problem it's going to take everyone doing the right thing, farmers, store owners, chefs, and consumers.

post #83 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post



 


Uh... capitalism created fast food, convienience food, supermarkets, and franchises.  It also created packaging and advertising. 

 

My customers demand that I have attractive packaging for my chocolates, the (deleted)-ing box costs more than the chocolates. And it's still cheaper for me to get the boxes from China than locally.

 

I order butcher twine along with top rounds, grnd beef chubs, and primeribs.  Everything comes in a separate box.  Even the string.  Wtf?  even the string.

 

It won't get better untill it becomes cheaper to be more ecologically minded. Only when water becomes metered will people install low-flush toilets, and collect rainwater to water their lawns and gardens. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to deviate a downspout into a barrel  for collection, but no one does it because it's cheaper and easier to turn on a hose.
 

 



You say fast food, convenience food, supermarkets, and franchises implying they are bad.  Of course you may get some support on a forum of foodies but in America all of those things are widely considered good ideas and the vast majority are happy to use them all.

 

Water would be metered if it was more valuable.  Its not as if truffles are going to waste.  In the end the market often determines that time and money are worth more than efficiency when it comes to things like food and water.  As an owner/operator though you know that running a small business in this industry requires fighting for every penny and its in your interest to use all of what you paid for and hold your suppliers honest.  Also do the boxes cost more than your chocolates or just the ingredients in them?  Because that's not what your customers pay for--they pay for your time and talents.

post #84 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverendfoodie View Post



Not an epidemic? at 50% waste in most cases what else would you call it, if a city, county, or state had an illness rate that high it would be a national emergency, if a computer company had a 50% failure rate it would go bankrupt, so if a farm waste half of its product and then a grocery store or food wholesaler waste even 10% of its product and restaurant waste as little as 20% of its product. do you see the problem and what it could mean for the nation as a whole, it could be the start an economic and health disaster of unimaginable proportions

 


 

Ridiculous analogy much?

post #85 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by benway View Post

...Water would be metered if it was more valuable...

Um, where I'm located, it is metered!
 

 

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post #86 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by benway View Post


 

Ridiculous analogy much?



Ridiculous waste much!!! ridiculous number of people will go to bed tonight without eating while we debate whether or not food waste is an epidemic. by definition an epidemic means:

1.  affecting many persons at the same time, and spreading from person to person in a locality where the disease is not permanently prevalent.

2.  extremely prevalent; widespread.

so you may disagree but I believe that epidemic is exactly what we have, and it's going to get worse unless we start making a change, there's no one solution, farmers are going to have to start sending their product to market even when its not picture perfect but still perfectly eatable and consumers at all levels are going to have to stop equating quality flavor with just the appearance of the item much!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

post #87 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverendfoodie View Post



Ridiculous waste much!!! ridiculous number of people will go to bed tonight without eating while we debate whether or not food waste is an epidemic. by definition an epidemic means:

1.  affecting many persons at the same time, and spreading from person to person in a locality where the disease is not permanently prevalent.

2.  extremely prevalent; widespread.

so you may disagree but I believe that epidemic is exactly what we have, and it's going to get worse unless we start making a change, there's no one solution, farmers are going to have to start sending their product to market even when its not picture perfect but still perfectly eatable and consumers at all levels are going to have to stop equating quality flavor with just the appearance of the item much!

 


Really how many?  In America that is because world hunger is a different logistical issue.  You meet a lot of starving people in America because I meet people that can buy live lobster with food stamps.

 

post #88 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverendfoodie View Post
... farmers are going to have to start sending their product to market even when its not picture perfect but still perfectly eatable...

This makes absolutely no sense!

 

Why in the world would you expect the farmer to pay transportation and handling for a product that will not sell?

 

Now, if you convince the consumer to buy the imperfect product, then there might be some sense.

 

Farmers make no money on unmarketable product, why would you increase their costs?

 

For the record, I am an Ag Engineer and worked for too many years as a farm manager to let this kind of thinking pass uncorrected.

 

Take a trip through a packing house of your choice and see whether you have a different viewpoint.
 

 

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post #89 of 122



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by benway View Post



You say fast food, convenience food, supermarkets, and franchises implying they are bad.  Of course you may get some support on a forum of foodies but in America all of those things are widely considered good ideas and the vast majority are happy to use them all.

 

Water would be metered if it was more valuable.  Its not as if truffles are going to waste.  In the end the market often determines that time and money are worth more than efficiency when it comes to things like food and water.  As an owner/operator though you know that running a small business in this industry requires fighting for every penny and its in your interest to use all of what you paid for and hold your suppliers honest.  Also do the boxes cost more than your chocolates or just the ingredients in them?  Because that's not what your customers pay for--they pay for your time and talents.


You're fun!!!

 

Convienience food.  Where do  we start?....Howabout school?  Ask any U.S teacher over the age of 50, and they will tell you that that the average class now is comprised of almost 50% overweight and obese kids, as compared to only 10% 30years ago.  Your Senators allowed themselves to be fooled by a group of lobbyists who "proved" that pizza and french fries are healty and nutritional for the Nation's school hot lunch progam.  Virtually every school has soft drink and snack vending machines, machines and a cut of the income provided by the big convienience boys to the schools.   Nasty, innit?  

 

Fast food..... Here is an industry that relies on advertising.  Not good food, not good service, not nutritional food, it relies on advertising to  survive and flourish.  It also relies 100% on prepared and processed foods.  No skill is required to cook.  By sheer volume, ingredients are purchased cheaply, processed centrally, and shipped all over the continent, No independant competitor can match the pricing.  The public buys it cheap, the public won't pay for well prepared food, only for what's advertised.  Think frozen dog turd partially exposed in a dirty snow bank is disgusting?  How about a pre-formed, frozen egg-product "omelette" made in a plant 5000 miles away, nuked a'la minute and jammed on a bun made in a large factory 3000 miles away from you.  It's good because it is advertised as good.  It is (deleted)-ing disgusting and a total waste of energy in it's transportation and energy used to promote it.

 

Supermarkets. These are the boys who demand that a tomato look good.  It can taste like crap,but it has to look good. Same with apples.  Money talks and growers respond.  Produce is grown to look good and taste like crap. Buyers want it cheap and buy in large volume, local smaller growers can not meet prices or quantities demanded by the chains, they are locked out and die off.  Produce is monopolized by the big boys. They can, and do, whatever they want to in their industry, lobbying is only one tool they use.    

 

Meat.  Who do you think controls the price of beef?  Mall*Wart.  don't believe me, do you?  Mallwart wants it cheap and suppliers--the big boys like Cargill have to jump.  Small producers can't raise beef as cheaply as big lots can.  Smaller packing houses can't operate as effeciently as mega-packing houses can.  So what?  For one, mass produced beef tastes like crap, two,animals are treated like crap, three, smaller producers get squeezed out,  and four, the market is monopolized by the big boys. 

 

If you think about accidents, they happen in mega-packing houses.  One item, like grnd beef or luncheon meat, or carrot juice, is produced on one line in a factory and shipped al over the country.  People are poisoned, inspite of health controls.  I'm not saying accidents don't happen in smaller plants, but the consequences are not as far reaching or disasterous.

 

   

All I'm saying is this:

 

Broaden your knowledge about food and how it's grown, made, sold, and consumed. 

 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #90 of 122

Foodpump,

 

The last word sums it up; "consumed"!

 

If it is not consumed, it is never purchased. If it is never purchased, it is never sold. If it won't sell, it will not be:

  • Produced
  • Harvested
  • Graded
  • Processed
  • Transported

 

I guarantee that if the consumers of whatever product refuse to buy it, changes will take place.

 

Can you imagine what would happen if no one ate fast food for one week?

 

Can you imagine what would happen if no one bought tomatoes that were not locally grown?

 

 

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