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Why does Gordon Ramsay do this? - Page 2

post #31 of 41

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Edited by ChrisBelgium - 1/13/12 at 5:49am
post #32 of 41

I have tried this recipe and can tell you that the filling wasn't cold. But i prefer the dark meat of the chicken cooked longer than this. So i did have the same complaint as his customers had about the dish on "The 'F' Word," the meat seemed very fatty. 20 minutes to me is not very long to cook a chicken thigh.  I tend to braise them for minimally an hour (braising being a higher temp than a poach). Or poached in the oven at 190 for 2 hours.  So the 20 min poach left me with a chewy, fatty texture i didn't really appreciate.

post #33 of 41

@ Boar,

 

Yes, sorry about that accent mark. I just bought a European keyboard. My previous keyboard is American and thus, no accent marks or other Latin Language symbols

 

Rotí in Spanish  comes from Rotisserie, a French word = roast in pan juices in oven

 

Margcat.

post #34 of 41

Hi Margaux,

 

Thanks.  I figured you knew what you were talking about, and took it from there.  I wasn't and am not about to correct you when it comes to Spanish food terminology.  While I'm fluent in Spanish -- including a fair amount of culinary jargon -- I don't have anything like your expertise in Spanish food nomenclature and defer to you. 

 

A roulade is typically braised.  If the dishes you called rotis were cooked covered, they could be fairly be described as a roulades -- or at least, "close enough."   If not, not. 

 

Other than clarifying some basic definitions for the benefit of others, I don't care too much about names; have no desire to argue these definitions with anyone having already said what I had to say; and am only responding because you wrote specifically to me. 

 

In the end it comes down to what you put on the plate.

 

BDL

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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #35 of 41

I still prefer to poach a roll of any type poultry in plastic cling film. It holds it's shape , the whole roll can be made uniform and it holds in all the juices. As far as plastic touching food? Funny but most hosptal kitchens I have been in wrap their 2 inch hotel pans first in plastic wrap then cover with foil and then put in a holding oven. The film doed not melt and it holds the moisture in the foods,  Many Tin cans today are lined with plastic coatings. Steam in bag products are plastic also. I will not cook or store any food in foil. Put a product in foil and freeze a month, the foil starts to self destruct and a grey powder appears. This is a sbstance called aluminum oxide which is used to treat some sicknesses(ulcers) and also a substance used  in  many underarm deodorants.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 41

not to throw gas on the discussion....roulade to me is a roll of something with a filling.....cake roll, omelet roll, meat roll....

 

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #37 of 41

No gas shroom,

 

Roulade originates from the French term "rouler" meaning to roll. An example of the sweet roulade would be as you know, " Bûche de Noël " or Christmas log cake. So basically sweet or savoury, if it can be rolled, its a roulade.

 

I agree.

 

Petals..


Edited by petalsandcoco - 1/18/12 at 8:44am

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #38 of 41

bon temp rouler baby~ it's king cake time!!!!

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #39 of 41

lol.gif thumb.gif

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #40 of 41

Hello Bor 'd' Laze

LOL love the name.  I think he does it to make sure the bacon is fully cooked and crisp without over cooking the chicken, that is my best guess

post #41 of 41

Hi GodsMichael,

 

You make an excellent point. 

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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