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Authentic Paella Marinera ( Seafood Rice ) & Photo

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

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This seafood and fish rice recipe comes from Levante, Spain which hugs the Mediterranean Sea, the provinces of both Valencia and Alicante. Valencia is the Meditteranean´s largest rice grower.

 

Serves 6 to 8:

 

250 grams of Monkfish or similar 

1 head of Codfish and / or Hake head

All purpose flour for coating

250 grams of Bream and / or Scorpion Fish ( 8 ounces ) or similar

250 grams of prawns and / or shrimp

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 small to medium onion of choice

100 rams of peeled finely chopped ripe tomato ( Plum Variety )

1 teaspoon La Vera Pimentón from Extremadura, Spain = Paprika ( similar can be used)

8 cups ( 1 3/4 ) quarts of mineral water or tap water

salt to taste

 

For the Arborio Short Grain Rice or Valencian Variety Rice ( available in Latin American Groceries )

 

1 pound fresh large mussels and 1 pound fresh large clams

4 large prawns or Crayfish

2 pinches of Saffron ( Toledo Designation if possible ) = less than 4 or 5 threads

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

250 grams Fresh chopped Squid ( Calamar okay too ... the Facial Nasal tentacles differ ) 

1 or 2 cloves of minced garlic ( depending on your palate )

1 tsp. Paprika ( La Vera from Spain if possible )

2 1/2 ( 410 grams ) Short grain Levante Valencian Rice ( arroz grano corto - valenciano ).

 

1) To make the Fish Stock: coat the monkfish and cod head with flour

2) heat oil in large skillet or Paella Pan ad sauté prawns and crayfish in olive oil

3) then remove, set aside and cover with a dish or plate

4) sauté onion until golden tender and then add the tomato and sauté gently

5) add paprika, the water and a little salt and continue on simmer

6) meanwhile, remove skin and bones from sautéed fish and shells and veins from prawns

7) add these seafood scraps to the broth and set aside

8) crush heads and shells in a Mortar and add to broth

9) cover the casserole and cook stock 40 to 45 minutes over medium heat

10) now strain through a fine sieve

11) To Prepare the Rice:

Firstly, steam the clams and the mussels

12) remove empty shell halves and set aside ( cover, keep warm )

13) Strain liquid produced from the mussels and clams and add to fish stock

14) salt the crayfish and heat up fish stock ( do not put crayfish in the stock )

15) add pinch of saffron ( no more than 5 threads )

16) heat oil in a 16 Inch or 40 Cm. Paella Pan ( a shallow metal pan ) or Stove top earthenware in same shape and measurements and sauté crayfish, squid, then the garlic, and tomato. Sauté gently and add paprika and rice.

17) stir briskly and add 5 and 2 /3 cups fish stock

18) recheck the seasoning and salt

19) cool quickly for 10 minutes and add fish and crayfish tail meat

20) turn heat down and cook another 10 to 15 minutes

21) check to see if rice is done

22) arrange mussels, clams and prawns on top of rice, with green olives and Roasted red Piquillo Pointy peppers on top ( they are jar goods ).

23) let rest 5 minutes and serve with a dry yet aromatic white wine, a young light red Pinot Noir or homemade Sangría, white or red ( see my article on Sangría 1800s ) ...

 

*** This is a great home entertainment lunch ... Add a salad, and some small plates of all types of olives, canapés of caballa ( canned Mackeral in olive oil or sardines with lemon ) and Roasted Red Peppers and charcuterie ... Make it a FIESTA !   

 

 

     

 

 


Edited by margcata - 1/15/12 at 4:16am
post #2 of 13

Mmmmm, that sounds yummy... Thanks for posting the recipe! Have to try a variation of that one of these days. :)

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

@dhruan,

 

Friday 11am - Madrid Time.

Thanks for the reply, as it really does make a lovely lunch for a bunch of friends and or a family group ... I do not know anybody who does not enjoy a great paella occasionally. It is a bit laborious, however, relatively simple to prepare.

 

  

post #4 of 13

Margcata,

 

Your recipe is much like the one my sister-in-law from Barcelona  taught me. I appreciate your contribution as it allows me to ask some questions just out of  personal interest.

 

Does some of the best rice come from Valencia (around the Albufera Nature Reserve) and Calasparra in Murcia ?

 

What about adding beans called " garafon" ? Some places add these to their paella ?

 

What is your opnion about the 'socorat' ? There are many that enjoy this in their paella, do you ?

 

There are so many variations of the paella, have you ever had it with other spices ? And which types of paella have you eaten which you have not enjoyed ?

 

Thank you for the recipe again, I look forward to your thoughts when you have some time.

 

Petals.

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
  
Reply
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

 

@ Petals and Coco,

 

Nice to hear from u. Hope that ur New Year has brought nothing but good tidings.

 

Of course, I shall be more than glad to answer ur questions --- Good questions too.

 

1) Socorate : is a Catalan word for the burnt crisp bottom of overdone rice ... Personally, I do not like anything overcooked or overdone.

 

2)  The Albufera Reserve and Murcia are the two largest rice producing and exporting regions in the Iberian Peninsula.

 

3)  Garafan beans are a staple in Mountain Hill Country rice dishes however, are not that common in the seafood and shellfish varieties. The origins of Paella, come from the La Sierra, the hill country and this dish was a shepherd and farmers´ staple. They prepared over large fires for the whole hamlet or village and the main ingredients were feathered game, chicken and / or vegetables or pork. On the coast, seafood and shellfish and fish for obvious reasons. There are two other beans as well employed in Valencian Paellas from the Mountains too plus snails. ( see recipe below ) and these beans are similar to a fava, lima and butter variety bean.

 

4) I have had several vanguard rice tastings at various events since September, where I have attended, for journalist´s coverage purposes, in other words I have sampled some interesting treats:  Chocolate Sushi ! and Coconut coated Nori trimming red tuna Sashimi and several dessert varieties at The Homage to Rice Event in September and Salon Gourmet ( held every March or April ). There are ùncountable paellas and each family adopts their own recipe, each restaurant and each region from Costa Brava down to Almeria -- this is paella turf.  Also had some riz au lait ( rice pudding ) that was quite vanguard --- red rice ( cayenne ) sort of a roll with black choc and sea salt, black rice ( squid ) with squid, and a green rice ( artichoke ) with a pesto. Interesting.  

 

5) Personally, the only rice paella I like is " Caldoso " ( bouillabaise - substantial fish & shellfish stock ) , sort of a not too wet consommé made from the shellfish stock, and not too dry consommé with lobster, crevettes or langoustines. Not too soupy in other words, yet not dry. I also like the Barcelonés Fideua too -- again not dry -- and with shellfish.  

 

6) Barcelona: the dish most popular from Tarragona north is Fideos ( In Spanish and Italian - a tiny pasta noodle ), or " Fideuá " in Catalan which is similar in preparation however, with noodles verses rice.

 

7) From my point of view, my cuisine is regional Italian first and foremost, and I like French 2nd. I do not eat too much red meat, mostly mussels steamed, langoustines, prawns, fish ( love salmon grilled rare ) and sole ... seabass... monkfish --- I like partridge too --- roasted. Love steak tartar, aubergine, Bolognese, artichokes, endives braised, quiche, etcetra and a good prime rib on flame with just some sea salt. The products are vitally important to me ... If the products are bad, and it is overcooked, the Paella is bad ... I enjoy my veggies, and mom never had trouble with my greens and I. I have had some sticky dry - certainly dislikeable paellas at local bars ...  I have since, learnt to make my own !!!

 

8) Every September in Sueca, Valencia ( 19 miles ( 33 km ) south from Valencia City, close to  the Hotel Parador Spa El Saler ) FESTA DE L ´AROSS is held. This international competition of Valencian Paella is their annual rice festival. The Albufera Natural Reserve is located quite close to El Saler.

 

The standard recipe for Paella Valenciana is quite different than my Shellfish one:

 

3 kilos of chicken

3 kilos of rabbit ( which I do not eat )

4 dozen snails

1.5 kilos of Garrofó beans ( similar to a fava or lima bean or butter bean )

500 grams of Tavella beans ( a greenish bean indigenious to Valencia )

1 kilo of Ferradura beans ( see above, another variety similar to fava or lima beans )

4 DL olive oil extra virgin

4 cloves garlic

4 ripe juicy tomatoes

2 dessert spoons ground paprika ( La Vera Pimentón Dulce = Sweet )

1.5 kilos of Rice from Sueca

12 - 15 Saffron strands

salt and 1 sprig fresh rosemary

 

 

I am quite fussy about rice and paella, so to answer ur question: once in awhile I enjoy a Paella Caldoso with Lobster as a dish where the socialising factor is key and a summer day --- it is a lovely dish to share amongst good friends and or family outing with a refreshing Sangría white or red variety.  

 

 

Hope this has covered your questions. If you need have any other questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

 

I wanted to re-mention, I love ur flower salad posted on Herb Article in Food and Discussion on Herbs and Ky did a mighty fine job on that review of the Herb and Spice Cookbk. I do salads like your flower one too.

 

*** Murcia  Rice :  they have their own way of preparing ... they do a fish and rice recipe which is quite well known in that region though not very popular outside of the Murcia. It is a very tiny grain rice.

 

Kind regards, Margcata


Edited by margcata - 1/17/12 at 8:30am
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

 

@ Petals and Coco,

 

Here is the information you had requested a couple of days ago. Thanks for the compliment ...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MARGCATA View Post

 

 

@ Petals and Coco,

 

Nice to hear from u. Hope that ur New Year has brought nothing but good tidings.

 

Of course, I shall be more than glad to answer ur questions --- Good questions too.

 

1) Socorate : is a Catalan word for the burnt crisp bottom of overdone rice ... Personally, I do not like anything overcooked or overdone.

 

2)  The Albufera Reserve and Murcia are the two largest rice producing and exporting regions in the Iberian Peninsula.

 

3)  Garafan beans are a staple in Mountain Hill Country rice dishes however, are not that common in the seafood and shellfish varieties. The origins of Paella, come from the La Sierra, the hill country and this dish was a shepherd and farmers´ staple. They prepared over large fires for the whole hamlet or village and the main ingredients were feathered game, chicken and / or vegetables or pork. On the coast, seafood and shellfish and fish for obvious reasons. There are two other beans as well employed in Valencian Paellas from the Mountains too plus snails. ( see recipe below )

 

4) I have had several vanguard rice tastings at various events since September, where I have attended, for journalist´s coverage purposes, in other words I have sampled some interesting treats:  Chocolate Sushi ! and Coconut coated Nori trimming red tuna Sashimi and several dessert varieties at The Homage to Rice Event in September and Salon Gourmet ( held every March or April ). There are ùncountable paellas and each family adopts their own recipe, each restaurant and each region from Costa Brava down to Almeria -- this is paella turf.  Also had some riz au lait ( rice pudding ) that was quite vanguard --- red rice ( cayenne ) sort of a roll with black choc and sea salt, black rice ( squid ) with squid, and a green rice ( artichoke ) with a pesto. Interesting.  

 

5) Personally, the only rice paella I like is " Caldoso ", sort of a not too wet consommé made from the shellfish stock, and not too dry consommé with lobster, crevettes or langoustines. Not too soupy in other words, yet not dry. I also like the Barcelonés Fideua too -- again not dry -- and with shellfish.  

 

6) Barcelona: the dish most popular from Tarragona north is Fideos ( In Spanish and Italian - a tiny pasta noodle ), or " Fideuá " in Catalan which is similar in preparation however, with noodles verses rice.

 

7) From my point of view, my cuisine is regional Italian first and foremost, and I like French 2nd. I do not eat too much red meat, mostly mussels steamed, langoustines, prawns, fish ( love salmon grilled rare ) and sole ... seabass... monkfish --- I like partridge too --- roasted. Love steak tartar, aubergine, Bolognese, artichokes, endives braised, quiche, etcetra and a good prime rib on flame with just some sea salt. The products are vitally important to me ... If the products are bad, and it is overcooked, the Paella is bad ... I enjoy my veggies, and mom never had trouble with my greens and I. I have had some sticky dry - certainly dislikeable paellas at local bars ...  I have since, learnt to make my own !!!

 

8) Every September in Sueca, Valencia ( 19 miles ( 33 km ) south from Valencia City, close to  the Hotel Parador Spa El Saler ) FESTA DE L ´AROSS is held. This international competition of Valencian Paella is their annual rice festival. The Albufera Natural Reserve is located quite close to El Saler.

 

The standard recipe for Paella Valenciana is quite different than my Shellfish one:

 

3 kilos of chicken

3 kilos of rabbit ( which I do not eat )

4 dozen snails

1.5 kilos of Garrofó beans

500 grams of Tavella beans

1 kilo of Ferradura beans

4 DL olive oil extra virgin

4 cloves garlic

4 ripe juicy tomatoes

2 dessert spoons ground paprika ( La Vera Pimentón Dulce = Sweet )

1.5 kilos of Rice from Sueca

12 - 15 Saffron strands

salt and 1 sprig fresh rosemary

 

 

I am quite fussy about rice and paella, so to answer ur question: once in awhile I enjoy a Paella Caldoso with Lobster as a dish where the socialising factor is key and a summer day --- it is a lovely dish to share amongst good friends and or family outing with a refreshing Sangría white or red variety.  

 

 

Hope this has covered your questions. If you need have any other questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

 

I wanted to re-mention, I love ur flower salad posted on Herb Article in Food and Discussion on Herbs and Ky did a mighty fine job on that review of the Herb and Spice Cookbk. I do salads like your flower one too.

 

*** Murcia  Rice :  they have their own way of preparing ... they do a fish and rice recipe which is quite well known in that region though not very popular outside of the Murcia. It is a very tiny grain rice.

 

Kind regards, Margcata



 

post #7 of 13

Margcata,

 

Thank you so much  for that informative post. I spoke with my sister-in-law and discussed the various elements of your recipe. The one thing they don't do with their paella is crush the shells in the mortar and they use only rice  in their paella (not pasta from Fideos).

 

"5) Personally, the only rice paella I like is " Caldoso ", sort of a not too wet consommé made from the shellfish stock, and not too dry consommé with lobster, crevettes or langoustines. Not too soupy in other words, yet not dry. I also like the Barcelonés Fideua too -- again not dry -- and with shellfish. "

 

This is my preference as well. There are so many recipes for paella and what I enjoy most about this dish is that each region brings their own signature to the dish. The history of paella and how it got its name is interesting . So many recipes call for chicken  and even chorizo or peas and other spices. You posted the second recipe with all those beans and I have not seen that recipe before until today.

 

Valencia has a wonderful history with paella and it is so nice of you to share the recipe.

 

Rabbit is something I would not use  but I do prepare and eat it (either work/home).

 

You mentioned that you like your  grilled salmon rare, this is the best way to eat it . If I do not grill outside, sometimes  I take a large fillet of salmon, lay it an aluminum bed with the sides folded in , place on a cookie sheet, then I rub dry mustard, dashes of  lemon juice, olive oil drizzle, salt and pepper , preheat oven 500 , place on  (broil),  and leave door open 5 inches and let it cook for roughly 12-18 minutes depending .......just one way, maybe you have had it this way ?

 

Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me. Forgive for not getting back to you sooner as I have been under the weather, terrific  thread by the way.

 

Petals.

 

 

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
  
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
  
Reply
post #8 of 13

   

  Margcata, Petals, thanks for the good read :)

 

 

  I'll certainly give the two paella recipes a try.  While I love rabbit, my wife doesn't...she wins on this one.  I know you have covered rice a bit, but I'm wondering how you would rate Bomba rice to others.  I normally have a number of different types of rice in the cupboard.  I have bought Bomba in the past, but this is something I'm not going to always spend my money on (I'd much rather spend it on Fresh Harvested Olive oils, yum!).  I probably end up with Valencia and Calrose...but for me paella is all about the flavor in that rice.  Have you got any thoughts on Bomba rice?

 

   Your post comes at a good time as I'm trying to eat healthier and eat more fish and seafood.  I'll give your seafood paella recipe a try, with any variance for freshness of fish used.  Maybe I'll see if we have some good weather I'll cook it in the paella over some lump charcoal on the Weber Kettle.

 

 

I have been buying fresh harvested olive oils for a few years now.  While I make it a point to buy a few from Italy, Spain and other regions, I'm always amazed by the flavor variances not only from country to country but also from region to region.  Or harvest to harvest on the Spanish and Italian oils that I've had from the same producers year after year.  I would like to hear any opinions or advice you may have on fresh harvested olive oils.  

 

Thank you!

Dan

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

 

@ Dan, ( Gone Fishing )

 

Madrid 19.00 hours Monday.

 

Firstly, I just received ur note.

 

I can certainly empathsize with ur lady, as I do not eat rabbit either. Do Not Fret. One can substitute white pork and / or extra chicken or other feathered game.

 

The beans that are mentioned in the Turf Paella ( are habas in Spanish and Lima or Fava Beans or Butter beans in English ). This is one of the oldest Valencian Rice dishes ( there are 1.000 more or less considering every family has their recipe ) calls for home made Chicken Stock of course, verses the fish and shellfish stock.

 

La Banda Rice ( arroz la banda ) ( banda is to separate and serve in 2 courses ) is grown around the Ebro River Valley and it is a traditional rice, that only yields half as much as the newer cultivated varieties.

 

The dish however, is called ARROZ A BANDA which means to serve separately ( 2 courses ). It is one of the oldest recipes of the Valencia region, and was founded in 1520.  There are 8 provinces which line the Mediterranean Sea on the east coast of the Iberian Peninsula. Each has their own recipes and their own way of preparing them with different rice varieties and even a noodle, called fideos, fideaú in Catalan and it is most popular in Barcelona, Tarragona and Girona.

 

The roundish grains are quite small however, it possesses intense flavor.

 

There are enormous differences between arborio ( I use ) and Bomba ( a dry type which forms a crust at bottom of pan ) ... If you refer to my post to Petals above, I personally prefer my rice Caldoso ( in a consommé - moist and not too wet, however, not dry ) thus, I use Arborio, however, this is a completely different recipe.  

 

Recipe for Arroz Bomba Valencian Chicken and Meat Paella ...

 

1) cut the chicken and pork ( or rabbit or feathered game ) into 30 pieces and add salt.

2) sauté in olive oil, Spanish extra virgin olive oil is preferred ( from Catalonia or Alicante or Tarragona )  Borges is a fine brand

3) wait for the meat pieces to cook thoroughly and add the beans ( after soaked in water all night ) and sauté

4) then add the garlic minced and paprika

5) add 7 1 /2 pints ( 4.5 Litres ) of mineral water and the snails and veggies and simmer 10 minutes

6) then add saffron threads and distribute evenly in pan and add the rice and repeat distributing evenly

7) cook whole mixture 8 to 10 mins. on high flame and then reduce heat to simmer another 10 mins.

8) allow The Socarrat = crusty rice at bottom of pan to develop.

 

As u can see, it is very different than my Shellfish Paella. Both are from different parts of the Mediterranean. The Shellfish Paella is from the City of Valencia and the Chicken La Bomba Recipe is from the village of Sueca, Valencia ( see notes above ). 

 

I hope this answers your first question.

 

I shall post you tomorrow on Olive Oils.

 

*** I also have an article on Olive Oils in the articles section ... However, I shall answer ur questions on Tuesday.

Real quickly :  there are numerous types of olives to begin with. Then there are mono varietals and mixtures. Then the designation of origin tells us a whole other story too ... Olives oils from JAÉN, CORDOBA, ANDALUSIA are heavier ( and are better for dipping with focaccia and herbs than cooking ) than those proceeding from Catalonia: Tarragona, Barcelona and Girona. Then, there are olive oils from just about all provinces in Spain ---

I had gone on an olive oil tasting and loved the ecological green olive oils I sampled from Jarandilla de La Vera and Plasencia in Extremadura, Spain which has a micro climate.

 

Carbonell and La Española are standard decent exported products. However, I prefer BORGES which hails from Catalonia. I believe they export too.

 

Which olive oils are u referring to exactly ? 

 

When I cook Italian, I use Italian products and when Cooking Spanish, Spanish ... same for French or Greek ...

 

Until Tuesday for more details on olive oils .

 

Truly pleased that u like the recipes. Paella is a group lunch to celebrate and enjoy and linger over some Sangria ( white or red ) and have fun. Great for family gatherings too ... I serve a light salad with it ... It is heavy. If u have any futher questions, please do not hesitate to enquire.

Margaux

 


Edited by margcata - 1/17/12 at 9:35am
post #10 of 13

    Hi Margaux!

 

I didn't understand how you liked your rice, when you said  rice caldoso...my mistake.  I guess we do prefer our rice a little different.  However, I will cook your recipes initially as you wrote them.  

 

 

  I usually get a variety of different fresh harvested olive oils, but two bottles I get every year is from Castillo de Canena First Day of Harvest.  I get one picual and one arbequina.  I've also had their First Early Royal as well.  These oils I've gotten harvest after harvest.  I've also bought other fresh harvested oils from different countries and regions in Europe.

 

 

ilus_colum_news_canenaoil.jpg

 

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

@ Dan, ( Gone Fishing ) and to those who share interest in 2 authentic Paella recipes.

 

Tuesday 17.00 hours.

 

Firstly, Caldoso is translated as Bouillabaise, substanial fish and shellfish stock keeping the arborio rice wet and the shellfish moist and tasty.

 

2ndly: it is impossible to list all the rice dishes of the 8 Iberian Provinces starting in the north with Girona and going all the way to the southeast corner of Almería. However, one thing I have noticed on several trips to this region is that, shellfish paellas are fish and shellfish based only and meat / chicken paellas are chicken stock based. A very common gaff is to mix the two, and thus, make it a touristy paella verses an authentic one.

 

3rdly, the original recipe was documented in 1520.

 

4) Arroz a Banda : Banda in native Valencian ( not Spanish ) means " Separately " not a band or group of people in crime or music.

 

This recipe uses Fava, Lima or Butter or Broad beans ( green and yellowish varieties ) and is served with ali oli to dress the chicken ... It can also be used to dress seafood products as well.

 

Banda originally was served in two courses: the first was the rice, and the 2nd was the chicken, rabbit, beans etcetra.

 

Modern times have changed the way in which we eat paella, however, in the small villages of Valencia, Alicante, Castellón, Murcia and Almería, this is still in effect, two course paella called Arroz a Banda.

 

I am going to provide u with the olive oil info in a separate reply.

 

Hope this answers all,

Kindest.

Margcata.     

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

 

@ Dan ( Gone Fishing ) and Those Knowledgeable about Spanish Olive Oils :

 

Topic: Answering Spanish Olive Oils

 

This vast subject is quite a complex one. Firstly, the Iberian Peninsula is a sea of olive groves and olives. It has almost 40  provinces and 35 or more produce olive oil and / or olives ...

 

The main varieties are: ( the most common, though there are countless )

 

Hojiblanca - very delicate, light and fab for salads

Arbequina -- soft and also used for salads and in recipes requiring a light oil

Picual

Cornicabra

Verdial

Lechín

 

There are uncountable producers and thus, oils can be Mono Varietal ( like a wine ) and / or Multi Varietal.

Depending on climate, of course, one zone can have an excellent harvest and another just a fair harvest. Chill and frost are another matter. The trees are another.

 

I had written in my Autumn 2010 magazine about an olive tasting and here are a couple I truly enjoyed: ( Not in order )

 

1) Almazaras De La Subbética - Carabuey, Córdoba:  100% Hojiblanca - complex, equilibrium of acidez, aromas of apple, herbs and spearmint, and a lovely extra virgin green color. Method:  ecological organic olive oil. www.almazarasdelasubbetica.com

 

2)  Almazaras :  Hojiblanca and Picual, possessing a lightly almond, piquant and bitter note ...

 

3) Campo Liva Aceites ( Oils ) in Jaén: This is a mixture of Arbequina, Hojiblanca, Frantolo olive and Picual. The green almond and green apple aromas and aromatic herbs, gives this one a lovely taste.

 

4) Rodau, S.L. ( S.L. is similar to Incorporated in English ). The Designation of origin is Torroella, Girona in Catalonia and this oil consists of Hojiblanca, Arbequina and Koreneiki olives. Tasting Notes: the mature fruit, green apple and green almond ... Lovely.  

 

The photo of the oil that you have sent me, I have not tried. I do prefer 100% Hojiblanca as a 1st choice and 100% Arbequina as a 2nd ... However, it all depends on what u are cooking or using it for too. Picual can be a bit strong for delicate white fish or salads.

 

BORGES Olive Oil : this corporation exports to the USA and it is lovely for salads.

 

Then there is also: www.RafaelSalgado.com

 

and :  www.olivardesegura.com ( an organic producer )

 

There are oils for breads mostly hailing from Jaén and Córdoba ( Mueloliva Virgin Extra ) which is a thick gold oil used for breads ... with a sprinkle of salt ... very Italian however, it has caught on here too ... " Roman roots " ...

 

Another good point : when u first taste test a wine or an olive oil, or a coffee; do NOT eat anything before ... and do it always in the early morning.

 

Sometimes, when people taste things, they are receiving the after tastes of an earlier digested product or two.

 

If I can assist with anything else, pls. drop me a line or two.

 

Kind regards. Margcata.

 

 

 

 

post #13 of 13

 

 

 Thank you so much Margcata, you really are living in a playground of flavors...thanks for taking the time to share. :)

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