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Peeling Orange Sections

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Is there any tricks to peeling the membrane off orange sections.  I bought a couple of blood oranges a week ago and peeled them and then attempted to peel the sections.   I ended up with blood orange giblets instead of nice looking sections in a desert bowl.

post #2 of 7

The technique is known as making orange supremes. It's rather different than your approach.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjOEGQ18F-A is the first hit I got at youtube, but there are others too that might be better.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Now I see, said the blind man.   Exactly what would cure my error of dividing the sections and then attempting to peel each one individually.

 

Many thanks!

post #4 of 7

I can't see any efficient way of doing it after the fact, Curious. But, depending on your intended usage, it might not matter. Usually if there are any problems it's with the pith, rather than the membranes.

 

Once you get the knack of cutting supremes, though, you'll wonder why you ever served citrus any other way.

 

Do you need any recipes for those blood oranges?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Ky,  Blood oranges are kind of unusual to find in the stores here.  I was quite surprised when I found them in a high end grocery.   And the next bin over had Meyer Lemons, another rarity in the hinterlands of North Carolina.  Been here for 25 years and never had seen either before in the stores.

 

If you got some good things to do with blood oranges please do fill me in. 

 

All I did was peel a couple of them, divide the sections and then spend an hour trying to peel those little suckers. 

 

The bowl of giblets I put a couple of splashes of some balsamic fig vinegar and a couple of tablespoons of honey.  Put them in the fridge to chill and had them as an after dinner treat.

 

 

post #6 of 7

You may be peeling to close to the skin. For hand peeling and supreme cut  on each side of membrane . this is called cold pack. The machine hot pack type(sold in gallonn jars) the supreme is cut with membrane in between or in center to hold it together. Hot pack is cheaper to buy.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 7

Blood oranges and Meyer Lemons have been making slow inroads in the Southeast, Curious. Mostly in the high-end markets, it's true, but even in some regular chains. You're shopping Harris Teeter? Wish we had one here.

 

Also consider seasonality. Blood oranges are sold this time of year, through about March. Then they disappear again.Tastewise, to me, they're closer to tangerines than to oranges. But you can't beat that dramatic color.

 

The way you used them would have worked just as well with the membranes still in place, IMO.

 

Here's a North African recipe. Although called a salad, it's on the sweet side, and can easily be used to finish a meal:

 

Slatit Bordgane

(orange and mint salad)

 

6 blood oranges, cut in supremes

2-3 tsp orange-blossom water

2 tbls orange peel, cut into fine matchsticks

3 tbls superfine sugar*

About 3/4 cup water

Leaves from a buch of fresh mint, finely shredded

3 oz blanched, sliced almonds

 

Put the orange supremes in a shallow bowl and springle with the orange-blososm water.

 

In a small saucepan, mix the remaining ingredients and simmer over low heat for 15 minutes.

 

Pour the sauce over the oranges and garnish with the almonds. Can be served warm or cold.

 

*Unless you use it often, instead of buying superfine sugar use regular granulated and pulse it a time or three in the food processor.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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