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Flattening Warped Pans

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

The subject frequently comes up...

 

You (yes, you!) can flatten warped pans. 

 

The technique is to heat them up, put a 2x4 long enough to go from edge to edge of the pan on to the crowned side, and beat the heck out of it -- all over it's entire length, while revolving it so the entire pan surface gets its share of whacking. 

 

If the pan is warped so the crown is on the outside, you have to rest the lip of the pan on a flat surface, so that the handle doesn't touch the surface; a stair step is good.  If the pan is warped so the crown is inside, you have to cut the 2x4 to fit -- as closely as you can but without making a big deal out of it. 

 

Just keep reheating the pan and keep on whacking 'til you get bored.  The flattening will hold longer if you do both the inside and outside, but you can get most of the goodness if you only flattened the crowned side.

 

You can get pans very flat this way, but the pan metal will not only develop a warp "memory," but fatigue as well from the warping and straightening.  Straightened pans will warp more easily than those which were never warped.  At some point, the whole process gets old and the pans will need to be replaced.

 

Hope this helps,

BDL

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post #2 of 5

A-yup....

 

Most places I've worked in, had a stack of beat up pots and pans, and  cement filled tubular steel parking barriers.  I usually supplied the hammer and manpower.

 

As you say, BDL, you can beat the warp out, but it always comes back.  Same with the rivets, you can beat them, peen them I guess, but the rivets are soft aluminum which will spread and fatigue, and eventually you'll get a loosey-goosey handle all over again. 

 

Try, just try, I double doggie-dare ya, to convince an owner to buy new cookware that doesn't warp.......

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 5
I'm having a hard time visualizing this.

Lets say my pan is warped concave so that it rocks around like bowl on the stovetop. I would cut the wood so that it fits inside the pan, flip it upside down and pound with a hammer.
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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post #4 of 5

Nope.  Flip the pan bottom up (crowned surface is now facing up) with the pan edges flush on a flat surface.  Lay a 2 x 4 on top of the bottom of the pan (which is now facing up) and whack it.  The 2 x 4 rests on top of the crowned surface.  In your example, the crowned surface is on the outside of the pan, not the inside, so the 2 x 4 goes on top of the bottom of the pan after you have flipped it over.

post #5 of 5
I see now. That makes perfect sense. I'm afraid that my example might be good for making your pan into a steel drum!
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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