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Rookie question about uniform

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I'm applying to the CIA and attempting to get some culinary experience beforehand. I just got a sort of "trial" position with a small, high end catering company. I'm going in tomorrow, but I have no idea whether they have a set uniform. Should I show up wearing anything in particular? Should I get a chef's coat? I definitely want to impress them (and not look like the newbie that I am..).

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks, 

Cecilia

post #2 of 8

I know this is too late to save you, but perhaps someone else will read it. Many people dress up 100% proper cook clothing: crocs on their feet, chef pants, crisp chef coat, some sort of culinary hat, weird TV chef hair style with a personality to match.

 

These people are a joke. They clearly are dressing up to make up for their lack of skills. I wear an apron at work, a chef coat when I'm in the mood.

post #3 of 8

I wear a t-shirt, chef pants cus they are comfortable and crocs or sneekers.

Apron.

 

different when working directly with clients.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #4 of 8

I have no required uni either so, black tennies or no skiddies & black pants, whatever teeshirt is clean,

and full bib apron for prepping, cooking, and running-for-the-damn-shallots-I-forgot-to-get-the-day-before, 

then in that tranquil "sweet spot" about 3 to 4pm, when everything's done, (just wating for "service-rush hell")

I dapper-up with a clean black (or white) chef coat and . . . . bada-bing. . . . insta-chef!

 

And that pretty much applies to both high-end plate work, and event catering.

 

And yes, I too have found that dressing to the hiltie; skyhigh-hat, designer-kerchief, and color-coordinated

sidecloth is a poor substitute for just being a good cook.

post #5 of 8

Ask your employer.

 

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post

I have no required uni either so, black tennies or no skiddies & black pants, whatever teeshirt is clean,

and full bib apron for prepping, cooking, and running-for-the-damn-shallots-I-forgot-to-get-the-day-before, 

then in that tranquil "sweet spot" about 3 to 4pm, when everything's done, (just wating for "service-rush hell")

I dapper-up with a clean black (or white) chef coat and . . . . bada-bing. . . . insta-chef!

 

And that pretty much applies to both high-end plate work, and event catering.

 

And yes, I too have found that dressing to the hiltie; skyhigh-hat, designer-kerchief, and color-coordinated

sidecloth is a poor substitute for just being a good cook.

I am just a line cook, but I tend to do the same as you. Spend the first hours in a full apron, wearing my usual jeans/work shoes/t-shirt then if I feel confident with the kitchen toss on a coat for the dinner.
 

 

post #7 of 8

Haha yeah, and if we DON'T feel confident about the kitchen....then we stay in our grungies,

hide in the kitchen, and don't show our face to the public all night. biggrin.gif

 

post #8 of 8

An owner/chef of an offsite catering company has different needs for staff and frankly for themselves.  Many caterers have uniforms; casual events could include polos & khakis or printed logo T-shirts, formal could be chefcoats & pants or other specified clothes.

 

You as an employee honestly don't have much say in what your company policies are......it's your bosses' discretion on how he wants staff to represent his/her business. IMPO.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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