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How do you Hummus? - Page 2

post #31 of 45

I guess I'm pretty "old school" with my hummus. Canned chickpeas, garlic, lemon juice and salt. The rest just depends on what I have lying around in the kitchen. Usually atleast some kind of hot sauce.

 

 

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Edited by Tayli - 8/8/12 at 1:36am
post #32 of 45

How about Tahini?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #33 of 45

Canned chickpeas are either not available here or very expensive, so I use dried ones. I don't use Tahini either as it is dificult to get.

So for me it is chickpeas, olive oil, garlic, paprika powder, lemon juice and some chili powder if I feel like it.

Am going to make a batch with some cumin in it, just to try....

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post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post

Canned chickpeas are either not available here or very expensive, so I use dried ones. I don't use Tahini either as it is dificult to get.

So for me it is chickpeas, olive oil, garlic, paprika powder, lemon juice and some chili powder if I feel like it.

Am going to make a batch with some cumin in it, just to try....



we made a new flavor last weekend using pumpkin (canned puree but of course fresh puree would substitute), peanut butter, curry powder, maple agave syrup for a touch a sweetness - dark pure palm sugar or natural sugar would substitute here,  and it was wildly popular.  here's the ingredients, the procedure is like any other hummous.  I would guess you could leave out the tahani or make your own using sesame oil and ground sesame seeds.

 

 

Curry Pumpkin Hummus
Makes about 3 1/2 cups, adapted from Diet, Dessert, and Dogs
1 cup dry chickpeas
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1 - 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter - be careful not to overwhelm with peanut butter
3 tablespoons tahini
2 cloves garlic finely minced
1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoons cumin
1/4 teaspoons salt (I used more, to taste)
1 bunch-ish of cilantro (again, to taste) (corriander leaf)

maple agave syrup to taste or natural palm or coconut sugar to taste.

 

we also made beet hummous which was GORGEOUS and tastey - diffinitely would need tahani in that recipe taste wise although maybe the peanut butter would work instead

 

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post #35 of 45

Wow...I see many new recipes here. I love the hummus made with chickpeas. They taste awesome.

post #36 of 45

I will share my hummus recipe too: ( I am not adding any exact measures, everything to your taste)

 

- chickpeas

- chicken stock

- sesame seeds

- cumin

- coriander seeds

- olive oil

- salt

- pepper

- bayleaf

 

Put chickpeas in pot, cover 2 cm above with chicken stock, put bayleaf in, bring it to boil and simmer until chickpeas are slightly overcooked and stock is reduced to one quarter. If your stock has reduced too much before chickpea is cooked, pour one more ladle in.

Slightly toast sesame seeds on frying pan, not too much colour.

Put chickpeas, cooking stock from chickpeas, sesame seeds and everything, except oil in and blitz until smooth. Then start to add olive oil, drop by drop or very thin stream.

Then just season it wit salt and pepper.

 

That´s it, straightforward, easy and lovely.

post #37 of 45

Hummus is best when made fresh. It is a little more time consuming than using canned chickpeas but worth the effort.

 

This is the recipe I use at my restaurant

 

3

cups dried chick peas (about 1 1/ 2 pounds), picked over and soaked overnight in cold water to cover mixed with 1 teaspoon baking soda 

 

 

3/4

cup extra virgin olive oil

 

 

 

Salt

 

 

8

large garlic cloves, peeled

 

 

1/2

cup tahini 

 

1/2

cup fresh lemon juice

 

 

 

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

 

1/4

cup pine nuts

 

 

1/3

cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves and fresh mint leaves for garnish

 

 

1/2

teaspoon sumac for garnish

 

 

1. Drain the chickpeas and place in a pot of lightly salted water to cover by 2-inches. Bring the water to a boil over a high heat until it foams, about 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the foam with a skimmer and continue boiling, partially covered, until tender, about 3 hours, so keep checking. Add boiling water to the pot to keep the chickpeas continuously covered. Drain and save 1 1/2 cups of the cooking water. Return the cooked chickpeas to the same pot filled with some cold water so you can rub the skins off the chickpeas with your fingers (many of them will rise to the surface).

2. Process the chick-peas with 1/2 cup of the olive oil and 1 cup of the reserved chickpea cooking water in a food processor until creamy.

3. In a mortar, pound the garlic with 1 tablespoon salt until it is a creamy mush. In a small bowl, beat the tahini and lemon juice together slowly. If it is too thick, add water. Stir the tahini-and-lemon juice mixture into the garlic and salt. Stir this mixture into the chickpea puree, adjust the salt, and season with pepper. Check the consistency. Check the taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. If you do need to adjust the taste, the process must be repeated--in other words, mash some more garlic with salt or mix a tablespoon of tahini with a tablespoon of lemon juice.

4. In a small skillet, cook the pine nuts in 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat until light brown, stirring, about 4 minutes. Remove and set aside.

5. Spoon the hummus onto a large round serving platter, not a bowl. Warm the remaining 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil. Make spiral or fan-shaped furrows in the hummus and fill with the warm olive oil. Sprinkle the reserved pine nuts around. Garnish the edges with mint leaves and sprinkle the chopped mint on top. Sprinkle the sumac over and serve.

There are other variations to this, we do a green hummus (spinach), a yellow (Roasted pumpkin) and also a red (roasted red pepper). All are great variations and best served with fresh arabic bread or even as a dip with kebabs. Hot or cold, just an amazingly simple yet delicious dish

post #38 of 45

ChefLayne, you got my attention with the date hummus

 

care to share, answer=YESbounce.gif

 

I loved reading on one of the posts here about saving your boiling water from the dried beans to add to the food processor.

how long have I been making hummus and not done that.  no wonder my hummus is impossible to get creamy.

DUH>.................thumb.gif

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post #39 of 45

on wrong page now and don't remember who said they don't use tahini.

too expensive, the person from Zambia {?} or Zimbabwai or or or.............sorry

anyway, I didn't ever use tahini in mine until I bought some due to reading online how it was impossible to make a real hummus without the use of tahini.

guess what?  I don't like it either.  I also think way too much is made of it's use.

[where's the hiding behind a couch emoticon?]

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post #40 of 45

Hey Luvpie,

That was me, about the tahini. (by the way, Zambia is the neighbouring country to the east of Zimbabwe, but I am acually Dutch)

I think my humus tastes pretty good without it, but then I never tried using it. I tried replacing with peanut butter once, but did not think that was an improvement.

I just read chef Oliver's recipe and I'll give that a try as I can get sesame seeds here. Or can anyone tell me how to make Tahini out of sesame seeds?

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post #41 of 45

It's all in the chickpeas, after I cook my chickpeas I add sea salt to the hot water and let them rest covered until cool.  These chickpeas will make any hummus recipe better or I just put them in a bowl and my customers eat them like popcorn.

 

post #42 of 45

to BUTZY:

Yes, for me, hummus is not hummus without sesame seeds flavour...

post #43 of 45

For me:

 

Quote:

hummus
[HOOM-uhs]
This thick Middle Eastern sauce is made from mashed CHICKPEAS seasoned with lemon juice, garlic and olive or sesame oil. It's usually served as a dip with pieces of PITA, or as a sauce. When TAHINI (sesame-seed paste) is added, it becomes hummus bi tahina. Middle Eastern markets carry both forms in cans or jars or sometimes fresh.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 2001 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 3nd edition, page 309, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

 

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post #44 of 45
Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpeas and in Syria and Lebanon it is actually pronounced himmus

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post #45 of 45

Since we're getting all etymological in this thread, it's always struck me as funny that in Isreal, when they want to go somewhere and eat hummus, they say "Comeon let's wipe (some hummus)"

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