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The Art Of Fine Mouth Watering Steak

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

We've all been to a true steak house before. How can I get that darkened crust on the outside? any resources books etc on how a steak can be made right at home? thank you.

post #2 of 8

It's easy.  To get good "bark," use a good dry rub -- like my "Basic Beef Rub," just S&P or any of a variety of different choices -- and use plenty of heat for the sear. 

 

Some of the specifics are different for cooking indoors or out, and if you want to use the cooking pan for a pan sauce, or whether you prefer to apply the high heat at the beginning, end or throughout  -- but the principles are the same.  

 

BDL

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hey there, I meant outdoors on a grill. Care to give any specific instructions? thank you

post #4 of 8

Sure. 

 

The Grill:

  • Gas or charcoal? 
  • If gas, do you have multiple burners?
  • If gas, can you get it really hot?
  • Hood or open? 
  • If you have a cover, is your grill a cabinet (rectangular shape) or a "kettle?"

 

The steaks:

  • How thick are the steaks?
  • What cut?
  • Prime, Choice, Select, or...?

 

 

The Basic Techniques: 

  • Clean the grill.
  • Temp the steak, and while it's temping, marinate in a very small amount of red wine and Worcerstershire, mixed roughly 50/50.  
  • Prepare the fire.  If charcoal, allow the fire to mature a bit past it's initial peak.  If you're using a kettle or cabinet, when the coals are ready, arrange them so that half the grill is very hot and the other half warm.  Also adjust the vents to help keep the hot side hot.  Leave the cover open while the grill preheats.
  • If you're cooking with gas, set the burners so that half the grill will be at max, and the other half just warm.  Close the cover while the grill preheats.
  • Clean the grill again, while it's hot.
  • Lubricate the grill by brushing or using a towel to spread high smoke-point liberally on the grates. 
  • Clean and lubricate again.  You want those grates really clean so they'll leave a nice tattoo on the meat.  A hot grill cleans better than a cold grill, and a lubricated grill cleans better than a dry grill.  CLEAN and LUBRICATED are watchwords.
  • Drain the marinade from the steaks' dish. 
  • Season the steak with rub (of your choice).
  • Set the steak on the grill and allow just enough time for the grill to tattoo the grill marks -- about 90 seconds to two minutes.  Rotate the steaks 45* to 90* in order to create a pleasing cross hatch.  Allow them to cook another two minutes.
  • Always use tongs or a spat to turn, never a fork.
  • Turn the steaks and place them on a fresh portion of the grill, if it's big enough.  Repeat the tattoo process.
  • Touch test the steaks to see if they're done (thick steaks won't be, but anything between 3/4" and 1" might well be cooked).
  • If they aren't cooked, turn them to the first side, and lay them on the warm half of the grill.  Close the grill.
  • If it's a gas grill, turn the hot side down to warm.  If it's a charcoal grill, try and choke the hot side by adjusting the vents.
  • To estimate total cooking time, use a weight/temp chart and figure an average temp (including searing time) of around 375. 
  • If it's a very thick steak... you'll want to turn half way through.
  • Touch test for doneness a couple of minutes before you expect the steak to be done.  Then every two minutes thereafter.  Don't leave the hood open any longer than necessary.  
  • Allow the steaks to rest for a minimum of 5 minutes (3/4" steak) to a maximum of 12 minutes (2-1/2" thick steak).
  • Never cut into a steak until (a) after it's completely rested, and (b) you're ready to carve.
  • You may use an instant read thermometer if you like, but not until you're pretty sure you're there.  Puncturing the steak is a poor way to judge progress, because you lose so much juice.

 

Touch Temping:

  • You'll undoubtedly get a lot of advice on which part of your body you should use to compare to the steak.  However, I use a slightly different method. 
  • If the steak is limp, it's raw or very rare. 
  • If it offfers slight resistance, it's rare.  If it just pushes back, it's medium-rare  -- which is ideal. 
  • If it pushes back with conviction it's medium well. 
  • Medium lies between medium rare and medium well... if you let medium rare rest an extra couple of minutes, you'll get what appears to be medium but is still very juicy. 
  • If it's hard, it's well done.  

 

That's it.

 

BDL 

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

WOW thank you. Towel to lubricate? do you mean a damp clean towel?

 

I have a lift top standard gas briquet grill but we also have a indoor kitchen grill that was built into the house with a vent and adjustable coal basket.

How far under the grates should the coal be?

 

Also my favorite local steak house, the entire steak is crusted and blackened on the top and bottom, how do they do that?

post #6 of 8

The steakhouse may be using a very hot, ceramic tile infrared grill to rapidly sear the steaks.  Not something easily done at home.

 

mjb.

 

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 8

 

In Spain, numerous Steak Restaurants and Gastro Bars use Volcanic Stone Blocks to sear steaks at diners´ tables ... Interesting.

 

@ Boar ;

 

Thanks for the steps to steps.

 

post #8 of 8

BDL  Very informative good article

 

  I use my palm of hand to judge   real low part under thumb  is rare as you go up thumb you hit mediium and then well.

I do however hate to cook it well and am hesitant  even when customer ask.  Why?  To what degree of wellness? just  to many variations of what defines well.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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