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Using Sousvide Cookery - Page 2

post #31 of 45

I have some Active RM and some GS.  I was just curious if long cooking affects the covalent bond at all.  Good info on the sv egg white clarification, I'm gonna have to try that.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post

I have some Active RM and some GS.  I was just curious if long cooking affects the covalent bond at all.


 

Ive used RM in conjunction with long SV cooking and had no issues whatsoever,   I have no experience with the GS.

post #33 of 45

Like Twyst said. I haven't done extensive testing but long cooking doesn't seem to have an effect. To my understanding, the bond is created by an enzyme and once set is irreversible.

 

@ Allen,

 

Thanks Chef, looking forward to revisiting this technique tomorrow. Also, when you say to make sure the egg whites are well combined is a whisk sufficient or do you recommend giving it a quick blitz with a burr stick?

post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 

Hi Jacob,

 

I made my clarification last night in just under five hours, probably could have done it in four.  I used two eggs in this case.  Sorry for the late reply but I took some pictures of the process.  I've not uploaded pictures to this sight before and I guess that I should have budgeted more than 10 minutes for that.

 

By well combined I mean just shaking the heck out of the closed jar.

 

Pictures soon(ish)

 

--Al

post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 

 

Really boring photo gallery, here we go!

 

Straight up beef stock:

 

IMG-20120125-00009.jpg

 

Same stock with 2 egg whites

 

IMG-20120125-00011.jpg

 

1 hour at 67c

 

IMG-20120125-00012.jpg

 

2 hours at 67c

 

IMG-20120125-00013.jpg

 

About 3.5 hours in

 

IMG-20120125-00016.jpg

 

Hour 4 (can you feel the tension?)

 

IMG-20120125-00018.jpg

 

This was probably ready to go at this point but I promised results so I let it go an hour more:

 

 

IMG-20120126-00020.jpg

 

Straining through a tamis set on another colander.  I had no cheesecloth, which I would normally use.

 

IMG-20120126-00023.jpg

 

End product:

 

IMG-20120126-00024.jpg

 

My apologies for the product placement (though the ibuprophane above is kind of funny) and the crappy phone pics.

 

One of the reasons I wanted  to run through this was just to nail down anything I was taking for granted.  I came (with a little help from the better half) up with two.

 

1)  I am using a Sous Vide Supreme unit for this.  This is a still water bath, no circulation.  I can't verify that that won't have an effect on this sort of application (though I can't for the life of me explain why it would).

 

2) After straining, if your broth is still cloudy, transfer to a pot and bring to a boil.  This will complete the clarification in seconds.  Naiomi, my wife, reminded me of this while watching me strain this batch.  She asked "and now you boil it?"  and I remembered that when I started playing with this idea (at 65c and with more/less eggs) I had to finish the broth with a quick boil.   She's quick, that one.

 

--Al

 

post #36 of 45

Very nice!  I'll have to try that, too.  Nice product placement for the ibuprofen!  That's one of the basic food groups among professional cooks!lol.gif

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #37 of 45

Thanks for the details. I've been slammed all week; hoping to possibly give this a shot tomorrow.

post #38 of 45

try adding a little agar agar to your stock freezing it and letting it thaw over cheesecloth. same result of a clarified liquid. 

post #39 of 45

Thank yu all for so much info on sous vide though im fairly lost on it i have watched a lot of work with it but done very little myself. 

post #40 of 45

@ Pirate Chef,

 

I've tried the "freeze-thaw" method using gelatin, the only problem is, the yield is a little low, although it does create a great result. Ideas In Food developed the method for setting stock with agar and then would chamber vacuum seal, utilizing one of the biggest complaints people have about agar, it's tendency to weep. Dave Arnold of Cooking Issues later discovered that the chamber vacuum sealing wasn't necessary; the same result could be accomplished with a whisk and a piece of cheese cloth.

 

I'm excited about this sous vide method because using agar, all though relatively quick, is easy to mess up and hard to pass on to a lower level cook without expecting a few fails. The freeze thaw method can take up to 2 days depending upon how much stock you're trying to clarify and the yield can be low. I think a 5 hour "set it and forget it" consume is a nice compromise.

post #41 of 45

I will have to try the method too it seems really solid. my only big benefit from the agar method is in a small operation i can freeze it in kind of a small cube style taking out as much as i need thawing it overnight for service and consume in  the morning. 

post #42 of 45
What happend to this thread !!! I have just started vacuum sealing and planned on SVing lamb shanks but I have a question. My kitchen is short of space for the large numbers we are currently doing. I have started to experiment. I have a white efficientcy rational and have been dry cooking my shanks overnight on 68c (normally for around 14hours) has anyone got any suggestions on how to get a better result out of this oven ? Or is there just not a quick way to cook this way ? Anyway love the posts picked up some great tips thanks and hope this will kick start this thread again
post #43 of 45

This thread is amazing!  I've got three quart size mason jars full of stock and egg whites sous vide-ing on my counter right now.  Will be watching that Harvard course for sure!

post #44 of 45

I lost track of this thread but it's a good one.  I've got a lot more Sous Vide under my belt now, too.:D

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #45 of 45

I just want to thank everybody on his post!!!  So many great ideas..I'll be honest for the longest time my SV was redneck...

 

You ask what is red neck SV....

 

A lexan with multiple fish tank heaters and a power head for fish tanks!!

I finally got a proper machine so I plan to try all of these ideas!!

 

very interested I the consommé and the clarified egg that intrigues me

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