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Special Needs. Not quite a rant. But quite long. - Page 2

post #31 of 47

That is also the way that we run. we request any dietary before hand so we can make sure to match the courses etc. Again tonight we had someone come in after booking a week in advance, and confirming the booking and that there were " no dietary issues" they showed up and turns out one of the people is allergic to any fruit including citrus. at the moment this is a good portion of our menu so reworking 7 courses alaminute is not the best thing to do mid service, it also came out at the end of the meal that she works in the industry as well and couldnt have the decency to give us a heads up! I have lost faith in people completely. 

post #32 of 47

IMO, she gets what you got at that point.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #33 of 47

As an owner of a website that deals with many unusual food allergies, I feel inclined to comment. I do understand that the bottom line is profit. However, there is some things you can do that can accommodate those special needs so that they at least have something they can eat.

 

1) Rice is GF and in its raw form keeps for ages. It's also Top 12 Common food allergy free in most countries, except probably Asia.

2) Most diabetics would be better of going Vegan. It will reverse their diabetes as well. A quick "Ice Milk" substitute for Ice Cream can be made with low sugar flavouring, ice cubes and milk blended in a blender.

3) Tofu can be frozen, then unthawed as needed. I'd slice them into thin cubes first before freezing. Sure, the texture changes, but most Vegan's/Vegetarians won't mind.

4) A quick Onion/Garlic Free tomato sauce can be made by simply tossing tomatoes in a blender then adding in Sweet Basil, cilantro and rosemary. Add in a little cayenne and pour over rice and you have a quick GF spaghetti on the cheap.

5) Nightshade free too? Puree beets and carrots instead. 3 part beets to 1 part carrots, approximately. Use Ginger in place of the cayenne. Add in extra Sweet basil (gives it a meatier taste too!), plus cilantro (or oregano) and rosemary, and you're done.

 

The Numbers:

1) MOST people who are anaphylactic do not dare eat out because they have been in and out of hospitals due to cross-contamination issues and can't risk having to use an epi-pen one more time, as it might be their last. This is why you don't see most of them.

 

2) Celiac/ GF people can very easily be accommodated. Tinkyada's rice noodles can be kept on hand and do not need refrigeration. Also, they are the number one ranked GF noodle. I've yet to find a GF person who didn't rave about them. However, most GF people are unaware of restaurants that accommodate GF people. One website is trying to rectify this and get the word out.

 

3) 1 in 250 people have a rare food allergy. And, many people with common allergies also has a rare food allergy or intolerance. However, most people with a rare food allergy, who does not have any other food allergies/intoelrances are unaware of their allergy because have never ate the vegetable and have refused to eat it. I avoided Radishes for many a year. As an adult, I took a couple sips of a pop with radish in it, and had a mild anaphylactic reaction. It required inhaler and antihistamine. I now carry an epi-pen. I did not know I was allergic to radish.

 

4) Not everyone who is special needs, is actually from your town. Sometimes, they are on holiday or on business. It would be brilliant if more restaurant owners could understand this and come up with 1 item we can eat.

 

Being allergic/ severely intolerant to the entire Mustard/Cabbage family, Avian family, Lily family, GF and Beef  and loving to travel, I find eating out a lesson in intolerance. However, I do not expect with my allergies/intolerance to get a awesome meal. I'd be happy if I could just get GF Fish and baked potato. Rice would be really cool as most places aren't going to have GF noodles. I would even be happy with head lettuce slopped on a plate and called food. Tomatoes would be an added bonus. Yes, I DO react to too many foods. LOL

 

 

post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlergkVegtarian View Post
A quick "Ice Milk" substitute for Ice Cream can be made with low sugar flavouring, ice cubes and milk blended in a blender.

 

:(  That doesn't even sound like dessert.  Glad I only have lactose intolerance.

post #35 of 47

That is actually for those who need low sugar. For lactose/ dairy free, I would use Rice Milk or Soy Milk depending on what other allergy I was dealing with - assuming I did not have Soy Ice cream on stock. Also, for someone not doing low sugar, I'd add fruit. Banana would even be good.

post #36 of 47

I've not read the answers to this but I need to reply first as a diner and second as a cook..

 

 

I am allergic/intolerant to eggs and I have to really watch when we eat out because if I am not careful I'll be spending about twelve or so hours driving the porcelain bus and trust me that is NOT fun and something to be missed at any cost..

 

As a diner I ask lots of questions so I know for sure I am eating something that will not make me ill..

 

As a cook... I want to make sure my patrons will enjoy their meal and I go out of my way to make sure what I serve them is totally safe for them to consume...

 

 

 

 

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post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by leeniek View Post
 ...I go out of my way to make sure what I serve them is totally safe for them to consume....

Absolutely!

 

And when you do not have the inventory to provide alternatives or the facilities available to prepare/cook the alternatives in a safe, timely manner, or the knowledge to meet their needs, you probably politely inform them. That makes sense.

 

For a prospective customer to expect that EVERY restaurant or food service facility is capable of meeting their specific needs or wants is absurd!
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #38 of 47

Sorry a last one to share... Tonight mid valentines rush we had a guest arrive " absolutely allergic to chicken, chicken stock or broth basically all bird.) notice of about 5 min on a set 10 course menu although when the foie course ( #7) came along it was suddenly fine. 

post #39 of 47

I understand where your rant is coming from. I'm only a link cook but have still had to deal with GF allergies, and the one that I found was ridiculous was a seafood allergy and the biggest seafood restaurant in the state right on the ocean. I understand it from another angle too, having a sever nut allergy. I can't eat any nuts, except for peanuts which apparently are a legume more than a nut. Its not as sever of an allergy as people who can't have peanuts or peanut oil. However very often when I go out to eat there are salads that contain nuts or deserts that I have to ask if they contain nuts, and if the wait staff "aren't 100% sure" as they so often aren't I simply don't order that dish. I could never make a big scene or huge deal about not being able to have something. Now I know a GF allergy is much different than mine, but I don't get the complaining. Also I hate when people make up allergies. Mine is life threatening, I have had one nut in my life one time, a cashew. It landed me in the hospital and I almost died. One of my close friends makes up an allergy all the time. He was a crack baby and apparently can't have the main ingredient in tylenol or advil or things of the sort. But every so often he'll say hes allergic to nuts, or one day it was fava beans. I've seen him eat nuts and he would not know what a fava bean was if it threw it at him. He claims he got a blood test when he was young like 5 ish that tested him for a bunch of different things. I've had the same test but what he doesn't know is unless you have had that food your blood won't react with it to show positively that you are allergic to it. I don't know a lot of orphan crack babies eating fava beans before 5 years old. I don't know why people make up allergies. Having an allergy sucks, I couldn't even imagine being allergic to peanut oil or living a gluten free lifestyle. /rant

post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate-chef View Post

Sorry a last one to share... Tonight mid valentines rush we had a guest arrive " absolutely allergic to chicken, chicken stock or broth basically all bird.) notice of about 5 min on a set 10 course menu although when the foie course ( #7) came along it was suddenly fine. 



Liars who pretend to be allergic drive US with life threatening allergies absolutely up the tree! We are trying to convince them that it just endangerous us and makes people think we are just trying to annoy the nice chef. Also, those of us with a clue, try our hardest to never go to restaurants with our allergies during any rush period. We also try to give notice, especially when it matters.

 

About crack babies or anyone who has done severe damage to the brain through street drugs: This damage can cause people to do or say foolish things. Intensive therapy can help, but even that can't always erase all the damage.

post #41 of 47

If you have a food allergy, you should carry a Chef's Card for Food Allergies: http://www.foodallergy.org/files/ChefCard_Interactive.pdf to present to the server when you are seated!

 

Here's another one: http://archive.supermarketguru.com/page.cfm/7512

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

If you have a food allergy, you should carry a Chef's Card for Food Allergies: http://www.foodallergy.org/files/ChefCard_Interactive.pdf to present to the server when you are seated!

 

Here's another one: http://archive.supermarketguru.com/page.cfm/7512



I so agree! I wish more people would carry Allergy cards.

post #43 of 47

I know what to avoid and if I'm in doubt I'll ask the server to check with the chef if there are any eggs in what I'm about to order.   I've never had anyone give me attitude over that and most of the time they go out of their way to help me and make sure my meal is safe for me to consume.

 

 

e

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post #44 of 47

If you have a computer ,type in all your alergies. shrink the document and make copies. Carry in your wallet and give to server. It is also good to carry in your wallet along with what drugs you DO TAKE in event you are in accident or some grave situation wher you can't communicate.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post I'll generally make and serve, with very little exception, anything Joe Customer is willing to pay for. Joe might have to wait a little longer. I won't comp anything that Joe decides he doesn't like or if Joe changes his mind. Joe also better tip my staff well. I guess it's the simple capitalist in me. Money and return business kinda does that to me. I'm funny like that. 

That's the kind of funny that results in success. Every day restaurants fail...every day. To succeed, you have to usually give a little bit more of yourself than the next guy. We all know that you can't satisfy the needs of every potential customer. But, I think it's the rare diner with whom you can't work to get a reasonably successful result. 
 

 

post #46 of 47

WOW. It's interesting for a change, that somebody noticed what I posted, and made a complimentary comment on top of that. Thank You. I've had the fortune that any place that I've owned/run was in Chicagoland. That being the case, I'm lucky to have had local purveyors of really good stuff close by and available quickly; even good simple grocery stores. There have been times that I've shoved a $20-spot in Danny the Dishwasher's hand and sent him down the street to pick something up. I can understand how that just aint's all so easy in many other places. When people have made reservation enough in advance, it's been no big deal to make things off the menu when asked. That has happened a lot when somebody wants to come in on Friday, and wants to have/enjoy Monday's special. That really screws things up when other customers see it and ask WTF? LOL @ Me when that happens.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #47 of 47

None of these are milk. They are companies seeking to sell their product under the guise of milk, so to pursuade the consumer that these things are a substitute for real milk , which they are not, Soy,Rice, Almond, Cashew, Coconut are not milks, they are the water or  juice or extracts  of the item and will not replace whole  milk. Let us start by useing correct termonologies.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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