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I'm trying to turn a solid into a smooth cream - what is the best tool?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Eg. course hard raw kale or a chicken breast into the finest, smoothest cream.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks a lot

post #2 of 8

Boil or steam till actually overdone, process in food processor then pass through a fine sieve. You can then season and add heavy cream or blend into a Bechamel sauce

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you, however.... assuming we are catering for a raw crowd... Can you recommend a brand or model of processor which can do extreme fine blending - ie. no texture - the goal is a smooth cream using the processor alone.

 

Or... at least the best brand which gets closest to this?

 

thanks again

post #4 of 8

My guess?? Vitamix or Blendtech

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 8

While both of Petes recomendations will work,  I would reco. a Robo Coup or cuisenart PRO food processor as it is a bit more versatile and can do other jobs plus it can do larger quantities

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 8

 

Quote:
assuming we are catering for a raw crowd

If this is the case be aware that blenders and processors can heat the food to above acceptable levels for raw purists. I have a Vita-Prep blender and it will produce steaming hot liquid in 4 minutes.

 

Methods that will work without heating are knife, or food mill, or buffalo chopper then a tamis.

 

 

A side note to anyone interested in buying a blender is that Vita-Prep is the commercial line of Vita-Mix and has a more powerful motor and is built to withstand the rigors of a professional kitchen. Do not confuse Vita-Mix with Vita-Prep. Same company, not same product. Looks the same, but built to different specs.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 8

The lowly meat grinder..

 

Go through one course die, one medium die, and then zing it through the food processor.

 

Of course, the higher the water content and lower fiber content you have, the easier and smoother it will be.

 

But the best machine for turning solids to absolute smooth creams?

 

I haven't seen one here in N. America, but were common in European pastry shops.  Again very low tech, consisting of two rotating marble rollers and adjusting the gap between the rollers to regulate how fine you want the mix to be.  Same principle for making chocolate from whole cocoa beans, or marzipan from whole almonds, and making various nut butters.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 8

Another option but on the pricey side is a Paco Jet. Food is frozen in a canister with some liquid and then finely shaved into a smooth consistency. It's mostly used to make both savory and sweet sorbets in high end restaurants but it would also allow you to achieve a creamy texture from almost any solid food item without heating.

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