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Sandwiches Cubanos

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Note: due to search engine issues, I erased my post here, but if anyone is interested in trying this, the full recipe with step-by-step photos and a lot of background information can be found here:

 

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/topic682_post21098.html#21098


Edited by tasunkawitko - 2/1/13 at 10:03am

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post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 

y


Edited by tasunkawitko - 9/18/12 at 6:49pm

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post #3 of 24

Don't forget the pickle. The history includes the pickle, but the insructions you're following don't.

 

I don't know what's traditional, but I lean towards a bread and butter style pickle when i make these sandwiches. The sweet&sour of that pickle matches up with it better to my taste.

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

hi, phatch -

i went back up and checked daisy martinez's recipe (3rd one down, after the adobo mojado and the pernil) - they're there, but i had to look twice to see them!.

 

yep, the pickles will be there, for sure ~ i like kosher dills, not a big fan of the bread and butter ones, but we will have both kinds on hand for people to use according to preference.

 

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post #5 of 24

Ok, I see them this time. Don't know why they didn't pop at me before.

post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

samed thing happened to me!

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post #7 of 24

 

@ Tasunkawitko,

 

Wow ... Cuban sandwiches ... Have made me think of my days in Miami Beach / Miami, where I lived 1986 - 1993 ... My dear friend Maria and I used to go have a Cuban Sandwich  every 2 or 3 weeks together on Calle Ocho ( 8th Street ). Fond memories ... and tasty too.

 

Interesting that Miami Cubans and Union City, New Jersey Cubans ( I lived in Manhattan ) have a different take on the Cuban sandwich ... The bread is quite a bit less lardier than in Miami ... and crispier. 

 

The Cuban sandwich in Spain ( not a huge Cuban Community, however, they have several Cubans who have lived here a long time ) is actually made with Spanish bread, more of a Baguette, similar to the French and they employ " Lacón " which is a Galician Pork Shoulder pink meat that is boiled, verses a Roast Suckling Piglet ( called a cochinillo in Castillan Spanish and " Tostón " in Cuban Spanish ) . BOTH quite good too, however, different.

 

You have just given me a good idea ! Thanks ... I am not a jar, nor can nor packaging woman, so I use " oak  barrel marinated pickles " which I pick up in the Historic Centre, at the Market ( The Rastro ) on Sunday mornings --- and they are to die for ... 

 

The website you have recommended is quite interesting, however, I have travelled extensively through South America and Mexico, La Republica Dominicana, Puerto Rico and lived 2 years in Mexico and 18 months in South America ( my deceased husband worked on commercial - business buildings / real estate archietectural projects there ) and the issue with duplicating recipes from such indigenious regions and their historic methods, gets a bit lost in the USA or Europe.

 

The Peruvian cuisines are stunning. I make Chupe quite often; a shrimp chowder, with potato, chili peppers and tomato. I posted a whole group culinary terms from these regions which u may find of interest. I also, enjoy fried Yuca, casava or manioc ... This is very Cubana !  Also, yuca en mojo which is garlic, lime coulis, and olive oil as it is a thick thick sauce ... And the Macho Plantains ( green bananas which are a vegetable NOT A FRUIT ) fried like crispy ... drizzled with lime as a side too.

 

Now, to go for ingredients, for a Cuban Sandwich !  Just the bread shall have to be Spanish !

 

Thanks for this post.

 

MC   

 

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 

hey, i'm glad you like it! mine turned out really good, but more on that later ~ i have one correction to make ~

 

Please note, people ~ I did make ONE mistake in my procedure up there! I coated the outside of the roast with [i]adobo mojado[/i], which is fine, but I should have also cut a few fairly-deep slits into the roast in various places and worked some of the rub into the interior of the roast, as well.

 
I did just that the first time I made [i]pernil[/i], and it did absolutely wonderful thigns for the pork. Considering the nature of the rub ingredients, which tend to carmelise and nearly burn on the outside while cooking, it actually seems better to me that most of the rubu should be on the inside of the roast, rather than on the outside, where it just sloughs off and turns black.
 
In any case, the cutting and inserting of the [i]adobo mojado[/i] INTO slits in the roast is definitely recommended, but I neglected to do that above. For best results, make sure you give this procedure a try.
 
On another note, the [i]pernil[/i] and the [i]sandwiches Cubanos[/i] turned out very well, actually better than I expected! Will post on results, including step-by-step pictures, as soon as I can.

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post #9 of 24

I have been making cubans for a while now,

but interestingly enough, I just returned from a trip to Fl

and multiple places included salami on their cuban sandwiches...

 

I tried it this weekend (we make cubans all the time with leftover pork)

 

i used a few different types of salami...

genoa, hard, kosher hard, a smoky variety, and Pick brand Hungarian Salami

 

the Hungarian was the clear winner!

 

The paprika and high fat content of the Hungarian salami added an extra flavor profile to the sandwich.

 

and will now be a must have ingredient for me...

 

post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 

z


Edited by tasunkawitko - 9/18/12 at 6:50pm

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post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonesdilligaf View Post

I have been making cubans for a while now,

but interestingly enough, I just returned from a trip to Fl

and multiple places included salami on their cuban sandwiches...

 

I tried it this weekend (we make cubans all the time with leftover pork)

 

i used a few different types of salami...

genoa, hard, kosher hard, a smoky variety, and Pick brand Hungarian Salami

 

the Hungarian was the clear winner!

 

The paprika and high fat content of the Hungarian salami added an extra flavor profile to the sandwich.

 

and will now be a must have ingredient for me...

 


In Tampa salami is a standard ingredient in a Cuban. It's the Italian influence in Ybor City. You will not usually find it in a Cuban in Miami

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post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

We made this again last weekend, using a slightly modified adobo mojado, and the results were nothing short of spectacular.

 
For the most part, we followed the directions exactly, including pulverising the garlic first before adding other ingredients to the adobo mojado; either method can be used with good results, but doing it this way resulted in a much smoother, less-chunky adobo mojado, which might be important  depending on your application. We also made sure that we cut slits into the pork roast in order to get the adobo mojado inside, where it really did some good.
 
One important difference is that, rather than wine vinegar, we chose instead to use citrus juice as an acid, squeezing a fresh orange and grapefruit, for a very good combination that is highly recommended.
 
The bread/buns on this most recent attempt were different, and not quite as good; they didn't get that same crisp/crunchy outside and soft interior that we got the first time - however, results were still very good, and the pernil itself was the best yet in the 4 or 5 times that I have attempted this.
 
My friends, if you have not yet tried this, then you really must. It is truly wonderful!

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post #13 of 24

Love a Cuban Sandwich...Medianoche is another nice one but the bread is near impossible to find so you have to make it in most cases.  My procedure is a bit different.  I don't have an actual plancha but heat a flat griddle, dry, and then assemble the sandwich on it (I warm the ham and pork slightly).  Similar to yourself I use cast iron, but a stack of pans for a lot of weight and flip the sandwich halfway through. 

 

The version I replicate comes from El Artesano in Union City, NJ.  When pressed, the bread crumb becomes compressed very thin and almost crunchy on the crust..but not quite.  Other than the Cuban bread (which is normally substituted unless I make it like this past weekend...pan de agua or some places use pan de manteca) and the mayo the ingredients are the same: ham, lechon asado, swiss cheese, pickle and cheap yellow mustard.  

 

The Grapefruit and Orange juice combination is a good substitute if you can't get a hold of naranja agria (bitter orange...usually labeled sour orange) for the mojo.   

post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

hi, zoe -

 

>>>almost crunchy on the crust..but not quite<<<

 

i know exactly what you mean here: that's very close to what i got with the method above, and i loved what it did for the sandwich!

 

your mention of naranja agria is very timely - living in the middle of nowhere as i do, this is not available around here. i also looked in some spots in the "big cities" of great falls and billings, but had no luck. finally, i rodered some from amazon, and should be receiving them ay time now ~ i plant to try for this application, as well as a vfew others. wonderful stuff!

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post #15 of 24

Fwiw, Badia and Goya (maybe some others) market a 100% bottled sour orange juice.  I have them on hand when the fruits aren't available which is usually and since I do a good deal of Cuban rooted cooking it's worth it. Yeah it's definitely quite useful as a seasoning. They are weird and the rind is usually really thick, the ones I have purchased and typically the juice yield is low from them but that's ok as you don't need a ton (unless you are seasoning a whole pig to roast).

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 

badia and goya are the ones i ordered - sounds like they will be really good!

 

previously, i have used a brand called "el mexicano" that a friend sent to me. i really liked this one, but as i recall, it wasn't 100% juice and ahd a few other things in it. very good stuff, through.

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post #17 of 24

I am sitting here weeping. What happened to that wonderful recipe?

post #18 of 24

dunno - why he would erase everyone of his posts... someone insult him?

or were they all copywrighted and plagerized?

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #19 of 24

You can find all of his posts at his forum at foodsoftheworld.

post #20 of 24

Thanks Phatch. The cuban and a mufallata are my two favorite sandwiches.

post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 

Phatch -

 

Sincere appreciation for your classy move of sharing the link above; I had intended to modify the opening posts of my "deleted" threads with links (similar to the way I modified this one), but time and family issues got away from me, and I neglected to do so; apologies to all ~

 

If anyone comes across any of my old posts, and wishes to have me insert the link as I did with this thread, please shoot me a PM, and I'll be happy to do so.

 

Ron

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post #22 of 24

Sandwiches Cubano makes me break-dance.

 

 

eta, I made pernil for New Years Eve. We love it.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #23 of 24

Mmmmmmm, love me a cuban. Lately, I got a sample of a product simply called "Mojo Criollo" with a plain white label. It was really good but now I can't find it because of it's nondescript no-name name. 

post #24 of 24

I just today discovered a place in the S. Loop of Chicago that makes a mean Cubano sandwich. They have probably a dozen wonderful-sounding sandwiches and some great sounding platters and sides. Very reasonable prices.  Still don't know how I've managed to work downtown for close to 3 years without knowing about it. I am told their Cuban coffees are delicious, too. Yes, Please!

 

It's Cafecito at 26 E. Congress Parkway, if anyone wants to know.

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