ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Calling All Food Experts!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Calling All Food Experts!

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm an MBA student doing some research into food & beverage...unfortunately I'm just a step above "can't boil water"!  

Was hoping that I could plead with you to fill out this survey to help me get a sense of cutting edge trends and market needs:

 

 

I sincerely appreciate your help, particularly if you know of any good uncommon products from your travels or experience.

 

Additionally, since a lot of you are experts, I'd love your opinions on any/all of the following questions:

  • What are some top trends in F&B innovation?
  • What health issues are getting the most attention with F&B?
  • What new ingredients will become more important over the next 5 years?
  • What dietary concerns do you have?
  • What uncommon products help people over 40 yrs of age?

 

Please feel free to just fill out the survey - write answers to some q's above - or do both if you're really terrific! smile.gif

Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 16

What health issues are getting the most attention with F&B?

As people are becoming more Allergy Aware, I'm finding that more restaurants are trying to accommodate people like us. Also, more businesses are trying to offer healthier choices and indicate these choices on their menus.

 

What new ingredients will become more important over the next 5 years? I am seeing more Gluten Free Pizza's available in restaurants - even in my town of about 18,000 people. As more people are found to have Celiac, this does become more important. The reason why more people are being diagnosed with Celiac is because doctors are learning that what they thought was IBS, is in fact Celiac.

 

What dietary concerns do you have? Sometimes it is hard to find a restaurant willing to accommodate those of us with unusual food allergies/intolerances. They think that we should just "eat at home" and we are just there to annoy them. The problem is that some of us do not have a choice and was unable to find a kitchenette to rent. We go on holidays/vacations or have business trips just like everyone else does. I'd wonder how they would feel if they were to go to a city in the middle of no wheres, that only allowed those with food allergies to eat at their restaurants? What if the place only served Tofu burgers and they were allergic to Soy but could only eat Beef? I'm allergic to Beef and can only eat Soy.

 

The truth is, that many people with the "common" allergies, also have a secondary allergy or intolerance that is not so common. 1 in 250 people have a rare food allergy. It is thought that 1 in 200 people have Celiac or Gluten intolerance. Gluten is considered a top 8 allergen. This means that Rare food allergies aren't really all that rare.

 

We don't expect businesses to accommodate for every diet by having it on their menu, but we would like to see them use what they have on hand, and just cook it in a clean pan, cut it with clean knives on a clean work surface. Just that would go a long ways to keeping those of us with food allergies safer. We can't always eat at home, as much as we'd like too. We do not mind waiting a little longer for our food. What I would give for plain rice some days.

 

What uncommon products help people over 40 yrs of age? I'm not aware of any. However, it has been established that around the age of 50, people tend to absorb less Vitamin B12. The Vegan diet has been found to reverse Diabeties. Probiotics taken in larger amounts are being used by some Allergy specialist to reverse food sensitivities in some of their patients. Cooking kills probiotics.

 

I find that every region can have different trends. So this is from my perspective in my area of expertise, dealing with allergies and intolerances and what I've seen in my travels.

 

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

That's brilliant AlergkVegtarian, thank you!

 

The whole gluten-free issue has come up quite a bit in my research & I'm looking into that more.  Thanks for pointing out the IBS connection, didn't realize that.

 

For those with allergies, what kind of on-the-go options are available that make life more convenient or are you always out of luck?

 

Thanks so much! 

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlergkVegtarian View Post
... I'm allergic to Beef and can only eat Soy.

 

OK, now I'm really confused! I must have misread a previous post where you commented that a "veggie broth" contained soy and that caused you problems. Did I misread?
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 16

and he gives recipes for his Chicken soup in another post ??? And a vege broth when home made contains guess what ?  Veges only, no soy protein .Some canned ones have soy and MSG They are not vege

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hey PeteMcCracken & chefedb,

Sounds like you're pretty into this - I'd love to hear your opinions on food & beverage trends - any new issues out there?

What new ingredients will become more important over the next 5 years?

Thanks for your feedback! 

~ K.

post #7 of 16

First, I am not a "food expert" by any stretch of imagination!
 

Quote:
What are some top trends in F&B innovation?

Whatever the media promotes.

 

Quote:
  • What health issues are getting the most attention with F&B?

Again, what the media promotes. The current "hot topics" appear to include:

  • Gluten free (celiac)
  • Crohn's (IBS)
  • Diabetes
  • Allergies, interalia Peanuts, dairy, etc.
Quote:
  • What new ingredients will become more important over the next 5 years?

Beats me, maybe what the media promotes?

Quote:
  • What dietary concerns do you have?

None.

Quote:
  • What uncommon products help people over 40 yrs of age?

I am not aware of any.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks Pete! I appreciate your perspective even if you don't consider yourself an expert. chef.gif 

I've been speaking with people from all different industries & backgrounds to learn what's important to them and what they notice -- needs that aren't met or that folks are trying to figure out.  It's been pretty interesting, so if you hear of anything, please keep me posted.  (Especially since California seems to be a hotbed of food innovation and I'm up here in Toronto!)

~ K. 

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAstudent11 View Post
... (Especially since California seems to be a hotbed of food innovation and I'm up here in Toronto!)

Promotion possibly, innovation, not from my perspective.

 

What in the world is wrong with healthy, well prepared food?
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

 

 

What in the world is wrong with healthy, well prepared food?
 

 



It doesn't have a high enough profit margin for the big companies.  I sort of recall seeing some numbers about Cargill and high fructose corn syrup, can't remember what they were but it was pretty interesting.

 

But there is activity in local foods, slow food and such.  That's promising.

 

Speaking of slow foods I made a crock pot of black eye peas and ham hocks, a good 12+ hours.  A big bowl of that with a cornbread muffin fresh out of the oven - yum!

 

mjb.

 

 

 

mjb.

 

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #11 of 16

@teamfat I wouldn't say that, just sticking "organic" or "traditional" or "Wholesome" or "Healthy Alternative" usually involves a reduced portion size and a substantial increase in price.

post #12 of 16

I think the advances will come in the form of labor reducing technology in particular in restaurants.  Most places have gone almost bare bones to save on food related cost. Only other place to save is on energy cost and labor. We in the future will see waitstaff being replaced by hydrolic robots. True they may lack the human touch , but they will be more effecient, and rarely will make errors require no vacation , wont call in sick and no workmans comp or any other cost other then an oil and grease once in a while.Everything will come frozen or freeze dehydrated. You will be able to program your home oven to actually shop for you. Keying in the recipe to it and the amt. of guest and it will spit out the recipe and quantities  needed. It will also tell you the price of the ingredients as carried by your local supermarket.. Supermarkets shelves will be a thing of the past, there will be bins that are loaded from the rear similar to a refrigerated showcase.( a lot of time and labor is spent on packing out shelves). 2 littre soda bottles may be refillable instead of buying new one. and on and on.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 16

 

What are some top trends in F&B innovation?

People are gaining awareness on modernist technique and realizing that you don't have to be a biochemist to use these odd ingredients or methods.  Ingredients previously confined to industrial food applications are easier and easier to come by within the haute cuisine kitchen.  Sous vide cooking is making its way into restaurants and even homes.  American cuisine as a whole is trending towards more humane.  A number of chef's I know will no longer sell foi gras or even veal.

 

What health issues are getting the most attention with F&B?

Its important to be more celliac aware than ever before and to have low carb options in general.

 

What new ingredients will become more important over the next 5 years? Vegetarians and vegans are really starting to carve their own little nitch in the culinary world.  Vegan/vegetarian restaurants are starting to be thought of as real places.  People are starting to "get it" that successful vegan/vegetarian food isn't about replacing anything.  The use of modernist cuisine techniques allow for these kinds of foods to be exciting rather than a bunch of raw food.  Ingredients that will become more common will include hydrocolloids like agar-agar, sodium alginate, and xanthan gum (especially in vegan baking).

 

What dietary concerns do you have? None.

 

What uncommon products help people over 40 yrs of age? I'm on the wrong side of this number.

 
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Anyone think there's promise in nano-technology & food?

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAstudent11 View Post

That's brilliant AlergkVegtarian, thank you!

 

The whole gluten-free issue has come up quite a bit in my research & I'm looking into that more.  Thanks for pointing out the IBS connection, didn't realize that.

 

For those with allergies, what kind of on-the-go options are available that make life more convenient or are you always out of luck?

 

Thanks so much! 



Usually, we are completely out of luck, depending on what the allergy is. Most on-the-go contains gluten and dairy, and is not vegetarian/vegan. Often they contain Tuna or Egg. Also, only the Teff Wrap really works well for Gluten free (as far as readily available bread). Udi's is second, but like the other GF breads, it tends to fall apart.

 

BTW, most restaurants would appreciate if the person with allergies would call a few days in advance and give a heads up. It makes life much easier for the Chef!

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

OK, now I'm really confused! I must have misread a previous post where you commented that a "veggie broth" contained soy and that caused you problems. Did I misread?
 

 



No, I can eat soy. I just can't eat Beef or Avian. ;) Gluten, Onion, Garlic and raw Carrots plus any member of the Mustard/Cabbage family can give me problems. Either severe GI or anaphylactic. Fortunately, I'm not allergic to Pork. Unfortunately, Pork is often cross-contaminated with chicken or beef in the restaurant. lol I don't blame them really!

 

Also, I used to make a home made Chicken soup BEFORE I became anaphylactic to Chicken. This was over 15 years ago!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Calling All Food Experts!