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Upset

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Well I'm 18 years old an I'm a line cook at a hotel and I'm also a full time college student.  On Monday I worked the night shift until 11PM then I was seculed to be at work the next morning at 5AM.  So today I went to work at 5am I did the breakfast shift by myself ad I got busy then I have to also do lunch and set up for that,but I had to run back and forth to the pantry side to make salad to prep for the lunch I was also working the hot line.  I didnt have enough time to fully prep the box to its full potential because I was to worried about prepping the breakfast box for tomorrows shift.  It got busy for lunch and the chef got mad and threatened to suspend me if I set up the line like that again and then he told me to get off the line and that he would handle it himself.  I'm alittle upset because I am a hard worker,but I sometimes fill that they expect to much from me.  I was also tired from working the previous shift.  Now I cant stop thinking about it and its driving me crazy because I'm meditating on it too hard.

post #2 of 8

Relax man, this is totally normal. Great cooks push themselves above/beyond the limits of what you may have thought possible all the time. The way you learn to do so is by dealing with whatever crappy hand you're dealt, doing the best work you can and learning from any mistakes you've made. You also have to keep a positive attitude because you WILL make mistakes, it's normal. Late night/early morning(or "clopen" as my kitchen refers to it) is a crappy shift but it's common in our field, so it's something you'll need to get used to every once in a while. As for having too much work thrown at you: I've definitely been there. Racing against the clock, muttering stuff like "this is impossible"... Over the years I've found this to be one of THE BEST ways to progress as a cook. The more work you take on/more stress you deal with the NEXT time you go to work that same shift you'll know what to expect and you can start developing habits/routines/tricks of the trade to make life easier. Not to mention the muscle-memory you'll develop at whichever stations you're at, making them feel more comfortable as time goes on.

 

Anyway, I guess the whole point of my post is: Chill out, stay positive, remember why you want/love to cook in the first place and you should be OK.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Alright thanks for the advice,I'm still a bit upset about the whole situation,but I will get over it!

post #4 of 8
This is normal, just let it go. There is a lot of pressure in this line of work and it can bring out the worst in people. Just like with your family, you have to forgive and forget, move on, and be able to spend a lot of time with your co- workers. There is no room or good that can come from grudges.

If your chef is a dick all the time(there are way too many of them out there), find another job. There are much more supportive and encouraging ways to deal with problems and it can only help you grow as a person if you surround yourself with supportive people. And unlike your family, you can choose who you work for.
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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post #5 of 8

Did you do the best that you could do? If the answer is yes, then stop ruminating on it. Past shifts are just that, past. There is always something to be gained by thinking of ways to improve though.

 

During a slow time, ask Chef for a few minutes of his time when convenient. Ask him ways to handle similar situations when they crop up. Ask him what areas you need to improve upon.

 

Do the best that you can do and remember that this too shall pass. Sensory input and thoughts are just that, they are not destiny.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice

post #7 of 8

Past is the past, most Chefs will not linger on it.

post #8 of 8

LOL. Stuff happens all the time. Last weekend I walked away from a Michelin* restaurant because I got sick of taking noise from a 24-yo kid. He is very good. He also thinks it's his kitchen and nobody else can do their own jobs. At 50-yo myself, I am no longer built for that. Be aware that our profession aint'e rocket surgery. Do the best you can every day, own your job, and go home at the end of shift feeling good about yourself. If some boss chef goes off on you when it's not warrented, let him know about it after shift. Become credible and people will think first before blaming you when/where it doesn't belong.  

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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