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Question Re: the Airbrushing of Pastiallge Showpieces

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Friends,

 

Can someone please tell me, do you airbrush pastiallge when it is fresh and pliable, or do you wait for it to dry and harden, airbrushing afterwards? I do know that my pieces sometimes develop a kind of "elephant skin" when they dry, so I smooth them off with fine grit sandpaper. For this reason alone I am inclined to suspect that I would airbrush them after drying (and sanding)?

 

Thank you!

 

-Ron

post #2 of 6

ChefRon,

 

Your on the right path, fine grit sandpaper and then air brush.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 6

It is air brushed when it is firm.. 

post #4 of 6

Put some iceing down on 2 saucers let  one dry not the other .now airbrush both. sand 1 after hard and see the results after spraying.. This way you can answer your own question.

I am not a pastry chef but have tinkered with various items. Fro what I watch them do on TV they paint almost right away.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 6

Always let it dry and harden, it will resemble matte porcelain. Only when every piece has been sanded then I airbrush (of course not every piece will need to be sanded, it depends how the surface looks and feels). Because its so fragile I always make extra pieces. Sometimes they will crack for no reason.....

When assembling, make sure the glue is not super hot, otherwise that could cause the pastillage to crack, if not right away then maybe later on. (thermal shock)

 

Remember: they can snap off or crack just by being handled and set on table, or by vibrations on a table. I always place my pieces on soft foam.

 

Petals.

 

 

ps. Dry it slowly to prevent the sides from curling. Try to make sure its perfectly smooth before painting.

Before painting it, should be glazed in the oven with a coating of gelatine dissolved in water, this will prevent bleeding if you are using water colors. If you are using artist's paint , then there is no need. I have seen many work their pieces without the coating especially when using pastel colors, darker colors for the highlighting, darkest at the end.

Some work on a wooden board to prevent it  from drying quicker, I have never .

 

 


Edited by petalsandcoco - 2/23/12 at 6:08am

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 6

From what I see that Duff Goldman (Ace of Cakes),  Cake Boss Buddy,  Bronwen Webber, Michelle Bomarito,  they air brush them when it is dry and stiff.

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