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The future of Culinary/Baking & Pastry graduates // Schools here in Canada

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hi! I am an international student here in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada currently in my first year of Bachelor of Commerce. Since I was in highschool, I have been passionate about baking. I've been thinking of not continuing my degree and go to a Culinary School instead. I really love baking. However, I am wondering what to expect after graduating in a Diploma program of Baking & Pastry? I am also thinking of going for a Culinary program instead since I see more future for it and some schools include patisserie in the curriculum. In line with this, what are the good schools here in Canada? I'm considering of going to Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in Edmonton wherein they offer Culinary Diploma for 2 years. I plan to find a job in a cruise ship after graduation but I also want to know other options for me. Let me know your thoughts!

 

P.S. I don't really have a lot of experience with cooking but I am a fast learner.

post #2 of 4

Before you do anything, i encourage you,---no I insist, that you first work in a bakery or restaurant.

 

Baking and cooking are trades, that is, we work with our hands , bodies, eye-hand cordination, and our knowledge. All of what I have listed are equally important.

 

Sait and Nait are exclleent schools, no question about that.

 

Do your homework and find out about crusie ships.  I can tel you that most lines offer a 3 mth contract.  During this time you will get no days off, and will work 12-14 hrs a day assuming that you are not short staffed.  You may be granted shore leave at ports of call for 2-4 hrsl IF you don't pull skeleton staff duty on board.  Crew bunk 4 to a cabin.

 

hope this helps

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your response! I read some threads here and thought that I should go as an Apprentice first instead. But I am still wondering which is better: Baking or Culinary? Which one has a better future? Say, the wage and benefits maybe. 

post #4 of 4

There is no "better".  Both are physically hard trades.  There are very few benefits in the hospitality industry, the only one that I know of is free staff meals.  Pay is usually based on experience; how well you graduated or what kind of school you graduated from makes no impression on most employers.

 

Remember this golden nugget of information: If you entered a culinary school with "o" previous work experience, you will graduate with "o" actual work experience. And, as I have said before, most employers base salary on work experience.

 

Do not take apprenticeships lightly, or employers lightly.  The employer must take an incredible amount of effort to train up a cook or baker with no previous experience, and most apprenticeships are usually 3 years.  If you have no previous experience--nothing the employer can judge you by to see if you will be an asset or a liability in these 3 years, you will find very few employers willing to take on apprentices.

 

Thus, as I have said in my first post:  Find work in a restaurant or bakery and see if this trade is for you before you invest any serious money or time into it.

 

Hope this helps

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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