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building a kitchen :)

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi guys i have recently had some issues with the kitchen i was working from, anyway i was hoping to utilise some space at my mothers (a brand new double garage with electricty) and convert this into a kitchen although i do have little clue as to what is involved, exactly what work will need to be done and costs. I should mention I am only requiring a basic kitchen as i just sell cakes and do decorationg. Any input is appreciated :)

post #2 of 8

Everything needs to be commercial grade. Even then, I don't know if you're allowed to still sell out of a residential building. Check with your local laws. 

post #3 of 8

Are you sure you know what you're getting into?????

 

For a "real" commercial grade kitchen you will require:

 

dedicated employee washroom

Minimum of 20 gallon hot water heater

Dedicated handsink for the  kitchen

Potsink

Mopsink

commercial grade dishwasher OR (if municipality allows) 3 compartment sink for the sole purpose of sanitizing dishes/cooking instruments

MINIMUM of a 55 gallon grease interceptor ( aka grease trap)

Ventilation system

Fire suppression system

 

And then, of course the neccesary cooking/baking equipment.  Household refrigerators are not allowed

 

transportation equipment (delivery vehicle, containers, etc) and methods open for inspection

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookers View Post

Everything needs to be commercial grade. Even then, I don't know if you're allowed to still sell out of a residential building. Check with your local laws. 


Around where I live (Los Angeles) it is illegal to run a commercial kitchen in a residential neighborhood. 

 

post #5 of 8

Does the state you live in have a Cottage Food Law?

 

Are you zoned for business?

 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 8

The cost depends on your county, city and states laws and ordanances. They kind of dictate if you need grease traps, hoods, ansul systems etc.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 8

I agree with all the the above statements and can't imagine a "mother's garage" being a suitable kitchen.  However, I know a LOT of people who are able to circumvent most of the red-tape by having a licensed "food truck" in the driveway. ;)   (Prepping and working out of a fully licensed and inspected "food truck" and having it parked in a driveway is acceptable, but any cooking done inside residence is a violation)  Also, some neighborhoods don't allow commercial vehicles to park in driveways or curbside. (Well, I live in FL it should be swale-side :P) but that can be another obstacle.

post #8 of 8

Cassandra, what you are proposing is to simply set up a basic kitchen for working out of your (mothers) home. People run businesses out of their home and fly under the radar all the time. Do you know how many catering companies and dozens (if not hundreds) of other business types are run out of one’s home????

 

Many highly successful businesses started out this way and it’s the true entrepreneurial spirit. Keeping your overhead low as you learn how to run your business will greatly improve your chance of success.

 

Having said that, it’s likely against many codes, insurance policies, community guidelines and laws. As long as you are not a nuisance to the community, it stays relatively small, no kitchen fires or high traffic, nobody gets sick, NOBODY is going to care. If your prices are right, I’ll bet that many people will support you just because you are working out of your home. Everyone likes getting a good deal.

 

So what’s your plan? How many cakes do you want to sell a month? If it’s simply an electric range and you have 60 to 100 amps to spare for that garage, not a problem. Ventilation is not really needed for a residential electric range just used for baking, but you will likely want it. You can purchase used NSF kitchen items at a fraction of the cost as there is a ton of it one the market with this crappy economy.

 

Give some more information as to your short term and long term goals so I can give you better information. Do your research and be smart as great success stories start out just as you are describing. CHARGE ON

 

 

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