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How many weeks/days does a chef work a year?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I started last week i'm a apprentice chef so do we work holidays etc  and what will i be doing on my first year??

post #2 of 14

Well, I would think you would work when the Chef said to and do what he said to do,  wouldn't you?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #3 of 14

I would plan on working when you have customers.

 

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #4 of 14

As often as you are told too.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #5 of 14

What will you be doing??     Apprenticing I think or whatever else chef has in mind for you. Holidays?  what are they?

 

""ONLY IN AMERICA, """RIGHT  PETE, CHEFHOW and JUSTJIM ?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 14

Well assuming you're in an open-to-public venue,  ask yourself "where do people go when

they're off work for the holidays?"

Answer: Out to eat. Where YOU work. So if they're there, and your Chef is there, guess

where YOU are.

 

As to your duties, you're apprenticing--translation, boot camp. The type of exhausting unfun

thankless kitchen chores you'll be doing are entirely up to your Chef's whims--

pray he has a limited imagination. chef.gif

 

-M

post #7 of 14

I worked so much during my apprenticeship that I had my hours needed to COMPLETE my 3 years in less than 2 full years. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #8 of 14

You may be asked to lube up the stove controls with elbow grease so that they turn easier. Does your chef require his cooks to use a bacon stretcher? There are left and right handed versions, make sure you use the correct one. You might also go pearl diving on occasion.

Does your chef drink coffee or tea? Make sure you learn how he drinks it, and when he needs more.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by newchef101 View Post

I started last week i'm a apprentice chef so do we work holidays etc  and what will i be doing on my first year??



I don't really think there is a clean and cut answer to this my friend. Sorry.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

You may be asked to lube up the stove controls with elbow grease so that they turn easier. Does your chef require his cooks to use a bacon stretcher? There are left and right handed versions, make sure you use the correct one. You might also go pearl diving on occasion.

Does your chef drink coffee or tea? Make sure you learn how he drinks it, and when he needs more.



That is the BEST advice I have ever heard, ESPECIALLY about the bacon stretcher.  Dont forget that if there is a high pressure steamer in your kitchen you should ALWAYS have a bucket of steam in the freezer for emergencies.  Its a disaster if it runs out...

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #11 of 14

Have you ever heard that the chef is the first one in and the last to leave.Which i think over the years most chefs do not do?

post #12 of 14

"Have you ever heard that the chef is the first one in and the last to leave.Which i think over the years most chefs do not do?"

 

Well how else can Chef know if apprentice can handle opening/morning prep duties, or cleaning/closing duties

by themselves unless he lets them be on their own a few (hundred thousand) times?

I mean it's as good an excuse as any right? tongue.gif

post #13 of 14

Many of my jobs were this way until I finally got good Sous Chefs that I could depend on.  Also  Chef Bubba you forgot "" When making and grinding liver for chopped liver wear a mask over your nose and mouth""   I told a guy this and he did it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #14 of 14

Of course you will be working a lot, but don't accept being disrespected because you are the greenest cook in the kitchen. You are going to be doing some of the worst tasks in the kitchen, but if you are refilling coffee, etc, etc, you aren't in the right kitchen. As an apprentice expect to be doing lots of peeling, basic knife work, lots of gathering for the other cooks.

 

On the other hand, if you are stuck refilling coffee, doing dishes, among other non-cook related tasks, I would suggest moving on.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefhow View Post



That is the BEST advice I have ever heard, ESPECIALLY about the bacon stretcher.  Dont forget that if there is a high pressure steamer in your kitchen you should ALWAYS have a bucket of steam in the freezer for emergencies.  Its a disaster if it runs out...



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

You may be asked to lube up the stove controls with elbow grease so that they turn easier. Does your chef require his cooks to use a bacon stretcher? There are left and right handed versions, make sure you use the correct one. You might also go pearl diving on occasion.

Does your chef drink coffee or tea? Make sure you learn how he drinks it, and when he needs more.



 

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