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Shrimp and Grits. - Page 2

post #31 of 50

That does look quite delicious kgirl

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 50

@Koukouvagia my husband and I are going to go back to the Carolina soon, can't wait!  The food there is fantastic, WAY better than this hoboken in the middle of the desert!!

post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschool1982 View Post
 

 

 

When you are talking about grits, the hands down place to purchase them from is.......Logan Turnpike Mills in Blairsville, Georgia! Their website is easily found on the web and they will ship everywhere.

 

No it isn't.  I get mine, Yelton's Best Stone Ground, from Lakeside Mills in North Carolina.  Actually there are a number of places such as these two that do real good grits, the way they have been doing them for the last two - three hundred years.

 

Don't waste your time with grits produced west of the Mississippi.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #34 of 50

Peel and clean about half a pound of shrimp.  Shrimp go in a bowl,
shells go into a sauce pan.  Put shrimp in fridge, cover shells with
water.  Add a bay leave, some black peppercorns and a dash or two of
Old Bay type seasoning.  Put on a back burner, bring to barely a simmer.
Set temp on oven to 400 F. put 9" cast iron skillet in there to heat up as well.

 

 

Pour some wine, waste a bit of time on Facebook.

 

Mix up the cornbread batter. Remove skillet, put in a nice knob of butter, swirl
it around, put batter in skillet, put skillet in oven.  Strain the shrimp stock.
Put back in pot over medium high heat, reduce for a bit.  Put small fry pan over
medium heat.  Add about two tablespoons butter, maybe a tablespoon olive oil.
When butter melts, turn off heat.  Add a couple smushed garlic cloves and a nice
sprinkle of crushed red pepper.  Let steep.

 

 

 

More wine, more computer.  Zip out to garage fridge, grab bowl of pickle meat.
Along the way grab a green onion from the patch north of the garage.

 

Measure out 2 cups of the shrimp stock.  Bring to boil.  Add 1/2 cup grits,
slowly whisking them in.  Mince shallot and small dice on a little piece of
the pickle meat.  Put the the pan with the butter back on medium low heat.
Sweat the shallot.  Add the pickle meat.

 

How's the cornbread coming along?

 

 

Looks a little dry - perhaps I misjudged on the amount of wine?

 

Put the shrimp in the pan with the shallot and pickle meat.  Turn the heat off the grits.  Stir in about half a cup of grated cheddar.  Stir the shrimp.  Put a blob of grits on the plate, along with a wedge of cornbread.  Top with some shrimp, garnish with the green onion.

 

 

 

Oops, a little too much butter from the shrimp - whatever will I do?

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #35 of 50

uhhh, sop that up with that nice looking corn bread, yeah baby!

post #36 of 50

I'm gonna regret putting this up, but I was the CDC of a small Southern inspired restaurant in SF for a hot minute and the Jazz center that we were connected to wanted to do a video on a classic southern dish.  Here's our take on shrimp and grits.  I still havent watched it all the way through because I cant stand watching myself on video.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4UzQ-2CKr8

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Peel and clean about half a pound of shrimp.  Shrimp go in a bowl,
shells go into a sauce pan.  Put shrimp in fridge, cover shells with
water.  Add a bay leave, some black peppercorns and a dash or two of
Old Bay type seasoning.  Put on a back burner, bring to barely a simmer.
Set temp on oven to 400 F. put 9" cast iron skillet in there to heat up as well.

 

 

Pour some wine, waste a bit of time on Facebook.

 

Mix up the cornbread batter. Remove skillet, put in a nice knob of butter, swirl
it around, put batter in skillet, put skillet in oven.  Strain the shrimp stock.
Put back in pot over medium high heat, reduce for a bit.  Put small fry pan over
medium heat.  Add about two tablespoons butter, maybe a tablespoon olive oil.
When butter melts, turn off heat.  Add a couple smushed garlic cloves and a nice
sprinkle of crushed red pepper.  Let steep.

 

 

 

More wine, more computer.  Zip out to garage fridge, grab bowl of pickle meat.
Along the way grab a green onion from the patch north of the garage.

 

Measure out 2 cups of the shrimp stock.  Bring to boil.  Add 1/2 cup grits,
slowly whisking them in.  Mince shallot and small dice on a little piece of
the pickle meat.  Put the the pan with the butter back on medium low heat.
Sweat the shallot.  Add the pickle meat.

 

How's the cornbread coming along?

 

 

Looks a little dry - perhaps I misjudged on the amount of wine?

 

Put the shrimp in the pan with the shallot and pickle meat.  Turn the heat off the grits.  Stir in about half a cup of grated cheddar.  Stir the shrimp.  Put a blob of grits on the plate, along with a wedge of cornbread.  Top with some shrimp, garnish with the green onion.

 

 

 

Oops, a little too much butter from the shrimp - whatever will I do?

What is "Pickle Meat"?

post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigito2 View Post

What is "Pickle Meat"?

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Pickle+meat
post #39 of 50

   2 pounds boneless pork butt, cut into 2-inch cubes
    1 quart distilled white vinegar
    1/2 cup mustard seed
    1 tablespoon celery seed
    2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce
    1 bay leaf
    6 cloves garlic, peeled and cracked (not smashed)
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    12 peppercorns 

 

 

Put it all in a suitable container, stash in the fridge for a few days, maybe a week. I'm sure it will be ruined if you use 11 or 13 peppercorns :)

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post


http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Pickle+meat

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

   2 pounds boneless pork butt, cut into 2-inch cubes
    1 quart distilled white vinegar
    1/2 cup mustard seed
    1 tablespoon celery seed
    2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce
    1 bay leaf
    6 cloves garlic, peeled and cracked (not smashed)
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    12 peppercorns 

 

 

Put it all in a suitable container, stash in the fridge for a few days, maybe a week. I'm sure it will be ruined if you use 11 or 13 peppercorns :)

 

mjb.

I see - thanks!

post #41 of 50

So, this is a very old thread...but shrimp & grits is timeless.

 

To clarify an earlier poster (from 2014 I believe), Bill Neal in Chapel Hill, NC popularized the "restaurant version" of shrimp & grits.  The poster back then did not, but I have heard countless people credit Neal with inventing the dish.  No, rather, he completely jazzed up a very basic coastal-Lowcountry dish that was most often eaten at breakfast.  By basic, I mean quickly cook some shrimp in a pan with a little bacon grease...pour the entire mess, grease and all, on top of some grits...and there is breakfast.  This meal is still eaten in much the same way to this day around coastal South Carolina.

 

Me?  While I like the simplicity of the "original" breakfast shrimp...I typically make mine with  course ground yellow grits and a flavorful country ham gravy.  

 

Now alot of people don't like grits because alot of other people don't know how to cook grits.  Grits take two things to be done "right".  1) Seasoning - from s&p, to butter, to cooking liquids other than water, you don't cook grits with just two ingredients!  2) Time - gook your grits long enough.  Don't ever use instant grits for anything, please.  That's not grits.  I personally don't have an issue with using "quick" grits as they don't taste much different from long cook grits...but even my quick grits cook for up to an hour before they are done.  Grits should not be hard.  If they are, the person cooking them has no clue as to what they are doing, or the final product they should be trying to achieve.

 

Would I eat S&Gs over polenta...of course I would.  In a restaurant setting, you can sure believe that my menu description would list polenta as a main ingredient.

post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Lancaster View Post
 

 

 

Now alot of people don't like grits because alot of other people don't know how to cook grits.  Grits take two things to be done "right".  1) Seasoning - from s&p, to butter, to cooking liquids other than water, you don't cook grits with just two ingredients!  2) Time - gook your grits long enough.  Don't ever use instant grits for anything, please.  That's not grits.  I personally don't have an issue with using "quick" grits as they don't taste much different from long cook grits...but even my quick grits cook for up to an hour before they are done.  Grits should not be hard.  If they are, the person cooking them has no clue as to what they are doing, or the final product they should be trying to achieve.

 

 

Mmmmm, grits

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

 

Mmmmm, grits

 

 

I've seen this, but thanks for sharing!!!

 

The funny thing is that this clip starts out with Chicken & Waffles.  Now this is a set that is supposed to make fun of Southern Food.  The biggest joke is that Chicken & Waffles isn't southern...it's a Yankee dish that people for some reason think is Southern.  Go figure.  

 

It's still funny.

post #44 of 50

   

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #45 of 50

I live in SC and I've eaten grits all my life. Granted a lot of that has been instant grits, heated with water in the microwave and toss a slice of kraft singles in there. A few years ago, however, I went to a restaurant in Fort Mill, SC called the 'Fish Market'. I don't like seafood unless it's really fresh and really good, so I got the only think that appealed to me on the menu, which was shrimp and grits.

 

It was amazing. I'd never had grits that good. They were stone ground, creamy, and delicious. On top of a big bowl of those was some pretty good shrimp and gravy. I also fell in love with tasso ham. They cut it into little 1/4" cubes and sautéed it in the gravy. They were lightly spicy and delicious. They were soft little bubbles of meaty goodness, and I hope I can say without being sacrilegious, but they would put bacon or Andouille sausage to shame. At least in the particular dish. I plan to try making some on my own at some point.

 

Luckily, we're going back the same restaurant this weekend for a birthday and I know what I'm getting, for sure! I've also been primed by a recent vacation to Charleston, SC and Edisto Island, SC. I ate shrimp and grits there several times and while they were all a little different, they were all delicious and the grits were really, really good. So even living in the south and near where shrimp and grits was probably invented, I still didn't experience great grits till recently. I strongly encourage everyone to seek out and try to find amazing grits or make them your selves. I picked up some stone ground Geechie boy grits to try and make at home.

 

It's kind of like when I was in college. A class required us to buy a full tailored suit and dress shoes. I'd always worn whatever shoes I kind of liked the look of. I'm flat footed and all new shoes are uncomfortable at first. I bought those dress shoes and a pair of nice socks and it was so comfortable I said to myself that I'd never buy a pair of cheap uncomfortable shoes again. I feel the same way about good grits now. I'll spit on the microwave grits, but I'll dive into these grits.

post #46 of 50

Lots of commentary about Grits / Polenta....which in and of itself, can be a whole thread

 

But......I was looking for more input on the different takes on the Red Eye Gravy aspect of the dish. Some noted different coffee blends, but not much about ham (tasso or otherwise), Andouille, onions or the like.

 

So, the open question is: How do You make "the Gravy"?

 

What's your version of this critical component of "Shrimp and Grits"?

post #47 of 50

I don't do red eye gravy, and I don't know anyone who does.  Variation of S&G are endless & everyone does it different.

 

I make "breakfast shrimp" often, which is where S&G originated from.  In it's most simple form it's just bacon grease with shrimp sauteed in it.  The grease is the gravy for the grits.  I normally add diced onion & green pepper that has already been sauteed...along with a bit of thyme, salt, pepper, & garlic.  To me...that's breakfast shrimp.

 

To get more fancy & go the Shrimp&Grits route is when you start adding the gravy, cheese, and accompanying plethora of ingredients.

 

I don't do cheese grits with my S&G, but I do use yellow, coarse ground "polenta" with a generous amount of butter and a bit of cream/milk.

 

My gravy is based on country ham, chicken broth, & cream.  We're all cooks here...make your own recipe using that base & you won't be disappointed.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by dectra View Post
 

So, the open question is: How do You make "the Gravy"?

 

What's your version of this critical component of "Shrimp and Grits"?

 

I do a couple of different versions, but my base is always shrimp stock

1.) a take on shrimp bisque

2.) a take on she crab soup

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by dectra View Post
 

Lots of commentary about Grits / Polenta....which in and of itself, can be a whole thread

 

But......I was looking for more input on the different takes on the Red Eye Gravy aspect of the dish. Some noted different coffee blends, but not much about ham (tasso or otherwise), Andouille, onions or the like.

 

So, the open question is: How do You make "the Gravy"?

 

What's your version of this critical component of "Shrimp and Grits"?

 

Grits and polenta are not the same.  Grits are made from hominy. For Shrimp and grits I use shrimp stock as the liquid base for the gravy.  Red eye gravy is made by pan frying country ham then adding just a little sugar to the pan drippings and deglaze with strong black coffee.  This is served over biscuits or grits.

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBogan View Post
 

I've never really messed with grits before, I would like to have them on our menu this spring but I have a couple questions. First off, how can you hold the grits once they are cooked? Can you par-cook them to certain point then finish in a saute pan? I assume that if I make a big pot for service they will set up right? I want to stay away from instant for sure but was thinking about using quick grits... I was also thinking that if I use "real" grits I would have a better chance of par-cooking without them turning to shit as they sit. Anyway, any help from you fine southern folk would be appreciated!

 

 

I've done two approaches, each has its merits

 

One, you can par cook them about 80-90% through, then hold them cold. Reheat them in a hot pan with some cream and butter, takes about a minute or so

Two: make grit cakes by cooking the grits, put on a sheet pan to cool and cut into squares. Flour, egg, panko and into the deep fryer to crisp up. They can then be held on the line or oven until use.

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