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Apprenticeship, fine dining or hotels and bistro

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Okay so I'm deciding to start my apprenticeship this mid march and I've been deciding to start off small steps at a time to go from cafes, bistros and hotels then onto fine dining.

 

I asked one of my friend who is currently an apprentice at tetsuya's sydney, and he says I should go start off into fine dining, its more stressful and complex as well discipline. but you will learn alot more.

 

and it is possible for me to be an apprentice at really fine dining restaurants because my mum has connections and are friends with the best chefs.

 

What do you pros think? should I start small and take small steps at a time, or just go fine dining?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 6
I would move directly into fine dining. As an apprentice, you will be doing much of the same work, shelling peas, peeling veg, lots of running around for other cooks, whether it be in a fine dining setting or a casual cafe. The atmosphere will be different and you'll see a bigger range of products, plating styles, different stations, cooking techniques, among numerous other situations in a fine dining restaurant over a cafe/bistro. So as an apprentice, you may as well absorb everything you can and get started with a fine dining background if that's an option for you.
post #3 of 6

Upscale and to the place where you think you will learn the most. If you worked fine dining you can work in a lower type place, but people who worked in lower type cam't do fine dining as quick.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 6
Why not kill 2 birds with 1 stone? Fine dining and hotels can go hand and hand. I did my apprenticeship at the Greenbrier Hotel and Resort in West Virginia. One of the best things I've ever done this day. Learn to operate at massive quantities as well as impeccable qualities. The chef there now just won the bocuse d'or, one of the biggest chef competitions in the world. You should check out the website to the hotel. To this day only positive things to say about the place.
post #5 of 6

Greenbriar is excellent source of knowledge. Back in the 60s I had the pleasure of being on a project with Mr. Herman Reusch who was f&b director and in charge of apprentice program.Program was great then and is still great. Unfortunatly most hotels are not Greenbriar even the Breakers has  spiraled downward. Most hotel Dining rooms are only good if run by a big name operator otherwise all they care about is banquet or where the money is. At Greenbriar as a in  few other places I have been in there is no compromise on quality. They think like they do where I work Part Time now, if customer ask for it, do it or get it. Or" reach for the stars if you miss at least you have hit heaven" which is a great way to treat guest. In most places today this is not done.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 6

I would start out in the place that gives your skills the most work out.  High volume and in house made items.  And always ask questions and look what the other person is doing.

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