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hoo chee coo chee anyone ?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

any one here ever cook/use huitlacoche/cuitlacoche?  appparently it's a fungus....like mushrooms? is the taste and texture similar? how do you use it?...thanks.....got a can of it because at first it looked interesting(con chile jalapeno), but when i read it's a 'corn smut', it made me a little wiggy..... let the FUNgus begin?....thanks

joey


Edited by durangojo - 3/3/12 at 8:21am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 11
Thread Starter 

someone? anyone? no one?..... in nahuatl(aztec) the word 'cuitatl' translates to excrement, and 'cochi' to black..sounds lovely eh?...destroyed by farmers and coveted by gourmands...therein lies the rub.....any takers?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #3 of 11

Aloha my Sista’ Joey!!

¿Cómo estás?

You piqued my interest

I knew that I had heard of Corn Smut before and it has been bugging me

So I Googled and a definition came up as Mexican Truffles

DING DING DING

I remembered watching a Rick Bayless program on PBS and he used Corn Smut

It was a very interesting show, he showed how in the fields in

Mexico they harvested and sold the product

Now I’ll I have to look for it in the Spanish Markets here in Tucson

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

i got a can for you!!.....how did he use it? what did he make with them?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #5 of 11

You might flag BDL.  I believe he has mentioned it here before.  I've never used it myself, but I admit to being interested.

post #6 of 11

Ya’ know, I can’t remember what he made

I was so fascinated and by the fact that people eat that stuff!

Then, not too long after we got here to the mainland, we went on

"A family educational excursion" (with Mom in tow) out to some farms in Willcox

And what did they Have?  huitlacoche , all over their corn; had pulled it all down to the ground

and they were going to throw it out to the pigs

I bet that could have brought in some extra dough for the farm, rather than pig fodder

Kinda' cool and gross lokkin' stuff though

 

 

huitlacoche, way cool!!

 

post #7 of 11
They're often compared to truffles, but in many ways are more like mushrooms. They don't have nearly as an intense an aroma as truffle, but do have a great depth of flavor. Like truffle and caviar or very expensive wild mushrooms they should star in most dishes, rather than be used as an accent.

Unlike truffles or mushrooms they are black and ugly, and the canned ones especially tend to leak color.

As a start... rinse the can off them in a colander. Saute them in a little butter until they are hot, and use them to fill a folded omelet. If you like, you can dress the omelet with a little cheese and garnish with sliced avocado. Fresh tortillas, fried potatoes (no rice for this one) and frijoles refritos will round out the plate nicely. Another very common way of preparing them is to stuff a quesadilla. Either will give you a sense of their gentle power.

BDL
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

thank you bdl for the instructions and the jumpstart. while i usually have an adventurous palate, i draw the line at bugs and insects...no chapulines or escamoles for this gal!  there are so many more wonderful foods to eat and experience; perfectly ripe cheeses and fruits,olives, salamis, seafood and chocolates for starters to waste my taste buds on bugs! as for the huitlacoche, fungus just isn't a very pleasing sounding word.   curious though, how else are they sold? fresh? frozen? being mushroom-like do they freeze well? how do you buy them? 

i will take your suggestion of sauteing them in butter...maybe some shallots and a splash of vermouth...just as an enhancement......might prove an interesting topping for crostini done like that. or in one of my favorite dishes....chicken livers sauteed with onions and sherry.....again, thanks for the jumpstart, migo......   buen provecho!!!

joey


Edited by durangojo - 3/5/12 at 11:58am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #9 of 11

Grilled portobello and spinach arepa with a fire roasted tomato sauce and a huitlacoche sauce

 

The sauce is a good intro to huitlacoche. Simple and easy and gives you some other flavors to bounce off of. I don't know if you can get fresh in this country, I have only seen canned. Basically lightly caramelize some shallots and garlic, add huitlacoche and saute briefly, add stock, simmer 10 minutes, blend.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

right now at this very moment i am sitting behind a very full truckload of big, fat,pink and quite beautiful mexican pigs...heading to market would be my guess. seeing the pigs led me to truffles, then to mushrooms, then to huitlacoches and what to do with them....you had me at 'their gentle power' bdl, so i will do as you suggest and fold them into an omelet.  though i'm not a huge egg fan,my husband loves them and a perfect omelet is a beautiful thing!  my first thinking was as a topping for crostini or as a subtle addition to simple sauteed chicken livers, but think i will go the omelet route first time out the gate.

as for the pigs, which are remarkably clean, like they just got a bath...they don't look or sound too happy...my guess is that they know their fate!

cheflayne, thank you for that great idea...that sounds right up my alley!.....

joey

 


Edited by durangojo - 3/9/12 at 8:00am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

so just to let you all know...

i lightly rinsed the 'can' off the huitlacoches con chile jalapeno, drained them on paper towels and sauteed them in butter and a splash of white wine just in case there was any can taste leftwink.gif...folded them into 2- 2 egg omelets along with some pulled queso oaxaca .....served with garlicky pan fried chef potato wedges and a perfectly ripe ataulfo mango(small seed,more fruit).  garnished the omelets with slices of fuerte avacado.(thin smooth skin and creamy), and a side of salsa verde...omelet tasted of corn, hence the name 'corn smut'.  better than i expected really, better than good but wouldn't run out to buy another can anytime soon. I am glad that after all my wondering at least now i know......so learn and live yet again!.....that's all folks!....thanks

joey


Edited by durangojo - 3/11/12 at 11:41am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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