or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Brine for pork loin - 30 people
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Brine for pork loin - 30 people

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I am hosting a dinner party for 30.  Would like to brine pork loin, roasted garlic potatoes and ??? on the rest.  What kind of brine can I use and will I be able to make great mushroom gravy from the drippings?  Any input would be appreciated.  Thanks

post #2 of 9

You will have to scale this to the amount of meat you are cooking:

 

4-5 lb pork loin (rolled and tied)

1/2 cup sugar

1/3 cup salt

5 sprigs fresh rosemary

5 sprigs fresh thyme

15 peppercorns

5 bay leaves

4 cloves garlic crushed

(juniper berries and fennel seed optional)

 

Mix into 1 qt boiling water until sugar and salt dissolve.

Add 2 qt cold water to cool brine.

 

Once brine has cooled, place roast and brine in large zip lock bag and refrigerate for at least 24 hours.

 

When you are ready to roast, bring it up to room temp and run 2 or 3 big sprigs of rosemary through the center of the roast (which is really two loins tied together).  I roast at 300F in a convection oven.

 

I often cover the roast with a mix of olive oil, minced garlic, salt, pepper, minced fresh rosemary and grated parmesan or romano cheese (a slurry really).  Sprinkle a 1/8 cup of white wine over the top before throwing it in the oven.  The cheese caramelizes and makes really great fond for gravy/sauce.  I use chicken stock for deglazing and making gravy.

 

If you want to do this, the mix is:

 

1/3 cup olive oil

1/3 cup grated cheese

2 cloves garlic minced fine

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

2 sprigs rosemary (or thyme) minced

 

adjust as you like.

 

Coat the roast liberally.

 

You can also do this on a grill with indirect heat.  Try and keep the ashes out of the drip pan so you can get a decent gravy.

 

 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much.  I will give it a whirl.

 

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by pohaku View Post

You will have to scale this to the amount of meat you are cooking:

 

4-5 lb pork loin (rolled and tied)

1/2 cup sugar

1/3 cup salt

5 sprigs fresh rosemary

5 sprigs fresh thyme

15 peppercorns

5 bay leaves

4 cloves garlic crushed

(juniper berries and fennel seed optional)

 

Mix into 1 qt boiling water until sugar and salt dissolve.

Add 2 qt cold water to cool brine.

 

Once brine has cooled, place roast and brine in large zip lock bag and refrigerate for at least 24 hours.

 

When you are ready to roast, bring it up to room temp and run 2 or 3 big sprigs of rosemary through the center of the roast (which is really two loins tied together).  I roast at 300F in a convection oven.

 

I often cover the roast with a mix of olive oil, minced garlic, salt, pepper, minced fresh rosemary and grated parmesan or romano cheese (a slurry really).  Sprinkle a 1/8 cup of white wine over the top before throwing it in the oven.  The cheese caramelizes and makes really great fond for gravy/sauce.  I use chicken stock for deglazing and making gravy.

 

If you want to do this, the mix is:

 

1/3 cup olive oil

1/3 cup grated cheese

2 cloves garlic minced fine

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

2 sprigs rosemary (or thyme) minced

 

adjust as you like.

 

Coat the roast liberally.

 

You can also do this on a grill with indirect heat.  Try and keep the ashes out of the drip pan so you can get a decent gravy.

 

 


Where'd you find this recipe it sounds delicious!

 

I'll have to try this, thank you.

 

post #5 of 9

I've used this recipe for years.  I'd like to say it is original - but, of course, it isn't.  It's partially my adaptation of a brined pork loin recipe from Patricia Wells' Provence cookbook.  I make the brine more concentrated and less sweet.  I run sprigs of rosemary through the center of the rolled roast, rather than tying them to the outside (the flavor permeates the roast better I think).  The cheese slurry coating is my now very much mutated adaptation of a recipe I once saw for roast parmesan chicken.  Works really well on whole beef tenderloin, lamb and roast poultry as well.  You can alter the herbs used to your taste.  It adds another layer of flavor and depth to the gravy/sauce.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Is overnight brining okay or is the 24 hours necessary?

post #7 of 9

It's all a matter of degree. The flavor will be better and more consistent all the way through the roast as the brine will penetrate more fully in 24 hours, but you could certainly do it overnight and roast.  If you do it for less time, you may want to brine the loins separately and then tie them together with the rosemary sprigs to roast.  That would give you more exposed surface.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much.  Everyone loved the pork.  The crust was delicious also.  I appreciate all of your help.

 

Sue

post #9 of 9

I'm glad it worked out for you.  We really, really like this recipe for pork roast.biggrin.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Brine for pork loin - 30 people