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Peanut powder?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello all - I'm new to this forum but have been reading with interest each day since I discovered it!

 

Anyhow...The other evening I was tinkering with a cocktail recipe and thought it could be good to rim the glass with some seasoned peanut powder.  My idea was to have the texture be similar to salt or sugar...about the size of cornmeal maybe.  I'm sure you can guess where this is going - when I tried to get it down to that size with a grinder, with a food processor, with a blender, I kept getting the same result ...peanut butter.  Well, not really, but it became pasty before it got to the size and texture I wanted.

 

So - is there some sort of stabilizing ingredient I can add that won't affect the flavor but will prevent it from becoming PB?  Or any other techniques for that matter?  Any suggestions would be appreciated!

post #2 of 10

This is from the large amount of oil contained in them. Try dehydration of nuts first then chop.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 10

hmmm

 

well, you could order some maltodextrin from one of those molecular gastronomy places. That stuff is expressly designed for what you're doing.

 

 

post #4 of 10

I'm worried about what kind of cocktail could be rimmed with peanut...

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thank's for the suggestions - I'll try them both and see which works better.  Having tasted certain things treated with maltodextrin, I think that is exactly what I'm going for, although I've never really done anything in the vein of molecular gastronomy.  It will either be a smashing success, or I'll end up scraping peanut paste off the ceiling; time will tell.

 

Brownedoff - I don't know if it'll be good yet, but the idea was to make a thai influenced cocktail: coconut rum, thai chile simple syrup (I've already made this stuff, and it is delicious, not just in drinks but I've used it to make some tasty dipping sauces as well), squeeze of lime, rimmed with a mixture of peanut powder and lime zest.  Cilantro and lemongrass are also in the bullpen, but they may not be called up to the mound.  We'll see...

post #6 of 10

Try powdered peanut butter, available on Amazon and other mail order sources.

post #7 of 10

Usually it turns into peanut butter because of the heat generated by the food processor. Pulsing the food processor for short bursts of time with breaks in between so it cools down can help avoid that problem. 

post #8 of 10

I think French Fries is spot on!

Chopping with a knife should work (you'll just end up with little pieces of peanuts all over the kitchen if you are not careful, she said, speaking from experience)

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Usually it turns into peanut butter because of the heat generated by the food processor. Pulsing the food processor for short bursts of time with breaks in between so it cools down can help avoid that problem. 


Powdered peanut butter isn't mixed in a food processor, so there's no problem with heat.

 

From Amazon:

"Through a unique process created by Bell Plantation that does not involve the use of any chemicals; over 90% of the fat is removed from the peanut. Essentially the oil is squeezed out of roasted peanuts and what remains is a peanut powder. The resulting all-natural product is unbelievable!The possibilities for PB2 are limited only by the users imagination and creativity! An outstanding natural protein source sprinkle on shakes, yogurts, smoothies, great for outdoor sports. Excellent for ice cream as it will not seize while processing, ganaches, frostings, truffles, soufflés, cakes, muffins, brownies. Dissolves easily for savory applications- Asian noodle sauces, breadings and crust especially for seafood. It is also wonderful for baking either reconstituted or as a powder."

 

post #10 of 10

Try a burr grinder (as in coffee).  I used one for years for refining nuts and hard dried grains.  Motor died a while, I still miss that sucker.

 

--Al

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