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What did you have for dinner? - Page 222

post #6631 of 6805



post #6632 of 6805
Recipe of the momo. Fillings.
1 lb Ground meat ( any kind)
Little more then 1/2 lb red onions
2tb ginger
1tb soy sauce
If can add green onion, if you have
Salt, according to your taste.

Mix everything in a bowl. Put 11/2 tb spoons of filling in the wrappers and you need to bind them. Or you can also make a pouch bag style. You can buy at the oriental market.
post #6633 of 6805

Today's country was Germany.  I made a dish using pork belly, onion, red cabbage, sauerkraut, dried cherries and apricot, apple cider vinegar, fresh bratwurst and a little lager.  It is quite delicious.  

post #6634 of 6805
This is my first post here smile.gif
I made 7 beef burgers today for family and friends with cheese and home made big mac sauce. And potato wedges on the side which everyone loved.
Turned out juicy and tasted fantastic actually.. yay me biggrin.gif
If anyone wants the instructions for the wedges or the perfect burgers and the sauce or even the sweet relish that is used in the sauce, just ask and I will be happy to write it down for you smile.gif
post #6635 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mishkawy View Post

This is my first post here smile.gif
I made 7 beef burgers today for family and friends with cheese and home made big mac sauce. And potato wedges on the side which everyone loved.
Turned out juicy and tasted fantastic actually.. yay me biggrin.gif
If anyone wants the instructions for the wedges or the perfect burgers and the sauce or even the sweet relish that is used in the sauce, just ask and I will be happy to write it down for you smile.gif


At first I read that you'd made 7lbs of beef burger... I thought "way to join the forum - what a first post"!!! :lol:

 

I for one would love to hear your tricks/recipes for wedges, burgers and burger sauce, please do share. Thanks!

post #6636 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 


At first I read that you'd made 7lbs of beef burger... I thought "way to join the forum - what a first post"!!! :lol:

 

I for one would love to hear your tricks/recipes for wedges, burgers and burger sauce, please do share. Thanks!

I think about this every time I grind meat.   What if I just made one giant _____   meatball, burger, etc

post #6637 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

I think about this every time I grind meat.   What if I just made one giant _____   meatball, burger, etc

Haha imagine that!

 

Well, I am no pro by any means. I get my recipes from all over the internet and I add or remove things from the recipe and maybe do a couple of changes myself.

Ok, so the burgers were about a quarter lb each I think (I work in kg not lbs so I am not very sure).

I had to make sure that the beef had enough fat in it, I do not know how much fat was in the ground beef, but I do not think it was less than 20% at least. Which is great for me, my family does not like fat. So I did not allow anyone in the kitchen when I was cooking, when they ate it they said it was great and I kept the fat secret to myself :D

 

The burger was cooked the normal classic way: Medium heat, do not add any oil (the fat will be enough), about 3 minutes each side (depending on how you like it) and salt and pepper on each side while cooking. (I also toasted the buns with a little bit of butter).

To have a nice layer of melted cheese on top of the burgers I waited until there is only about a minute left, and I added two slices of cheese on each burger patty, added a very small amount of water and covered quickly for about 10 or 15 seconds. And voila! melted cheese!

 

The trick for me was the sauce, I got this from a couple of sources including a video where an Executive Chef at McDondald's explained how you can make a version of the big mac sauce with ingredients that are available at any local grocery store.

The Sauce:

Mayo + Mustard + Sweet pickle relish (recipe follows) + Garlic powder + Onion powder + Paprika + a little bit of White wine vinegar ( I used White Vinegar). Mix well.

The Sweet Pickle Relish (I actually never heard of it before I tried to make this sauce):

 

Ingredients:

1- 4 cups chopped onions.

2- 2 cups chopped cucumbers.

3- 1 cup green pepper.

4- 1/4 cup salt.

5- 3.5 cups sugar.

6- 2 cups cider vinegar.

7- 1 tbsp celery seed.

8- 1 tbsp mustard seed.

 

Directions:

1- Combine cucumbers + peppers + onions + salt. And cover with cold water and let it rest for 2 hours at least.

2- Drain thoroughly, very important to press out all liquid with your hand.

3- Combine sugar + vinegar + celery seed + mustard seed. Bring to a boil and make sure the sugar is dissolved.

4- Add the drained vegetables and bring to a boil again for 10 minutes.

5- Pack into jars and leave about 1/4 inch empty space at the top.

 

Potato Wedges:

 

It is very simple, but it took more than an hour and half for me to be fully cooked, I am not sure if I did something wrong, or I used the wrong type of potatoes.

I basically cut 4 potatoes to 12 wedges each, and mixed with my hand with olive oil, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper and paprika.

I placed the potatoes on a baking sheet that had some sprinkled oil on it to make sure potatoes do not stick.

I read that it takes about 25 or 30 minutes to cook.. It took me more than an hour and a half on 220 degrees C! (425 degrees F)

Does not matter, it tasted great in the end and everyone loved it :D

 

Wow.. well that was a long post!

post #6638 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

I think about this every time I grind meat.   What if I just made one giant _____   meatball, burger, etc


Uh, isn't that meatloaf?    :D

post #6639 of 6805

Pork chops, creamed spinach, green beans, pears

post #6640 of 6805

What a cliché, but today I cooked an Old fashion Corned beef from Cosco. Adding extra coriander seeds, 10 bay leaves, black and red pepper, 4 quarts of water, the corned beef and simmered on low for five hours. Red potatoes and the cabbage added the last hour. Just French mustard and some butter on the vegetables all that was needed.

post #6641 of 6805

I had some fresh brats left over and some escarole so I made soup with those and a half cup of fire roasted tomatoes, a bag of chicken stock out of the freezer, mira poix, cannellini, etc, etc.  I took the bratwursts and turned them into Italian meatballs and man oh man was it good - it be even on better Monday.  I served it with toasted baguette slices with compound butter and grated pecorino and a drizzle of evoo.

 

post #6642 of 6805

Bread stuffed with fish and mushrooms, brussels sprouts, caramel pears with black pepper and parmesan

post #6643 of 6805
My Husband took me and our kids out to eat at Mugshots. The food was great but the silverware was dirty, so for that i give them a 3/5
post #6644 of 6805
Well after cooking and baking the past 3 days, I just didn't feel like eating a full meal. So leftovers were put in the freezer and I made peanut butter, jelly, and banana sandwich son toasted gluten free bread.
post #6645 of 6805

Fried rice.  We needed to empty the fridge.

 

Diced carrots

2 eggs

Garlic and red pepper cooked in schmaltz and olive oil

Rice

Oyster sauce, soy sauce, sherry

Leftover green beans (butter, salt, pepper)

Diced leftover pork chops

About 3/4 cup leftover mushroom risotto

 

Mongolian fire oil

 

Gin martini

 

I finally remembered a pic

 

post #6646 of 6805

My mother gets frozen meals delivered to her and they are pretty much bland - okay - they are nasty entrees.  I used to throw them away, but then I decided I'm wasting food and that's a shame... what can I do to beef these meals up?  I started bagging the corn together, the mixed veggies, the potatoes and the foods that we normally eat.  Once I had enough for a meal, I'd cooked them like I would normally with seasoning and they didn't taste so bad.  One day, she wanted some okra but we were out - since I didn't want to hear why you let us run out of okra, I found some broccoli from one of the meals and fried it.  It was green - she can't really see that well so I served it to her.  She didn't know the difference and gave me thumbs up.  I know you're probably saying - shame on me but hey, can't blame me for trying to please an 85-year-old lady now can ya? She was happy but when she finished eating - she asked if I did anything different, the okra tasted differed but she like it and to me, that's all that matters. 

post #6647 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikki Donaldson View Post

My mother gets frozen meals delivered to her and they are pretty much bland - okay - they are nasty entrees.  I used to throw them away, but then I decided I'm wasting food and that's a shame... what can I do to beef these meals up?  I started bagging the corn together, the mixed veggies, the potatoes and the foods that we normally eat.  Once I had enough for a meal, I'd cooked them like I would normally with seasoning and they didn't taste so bad.  One day, she wanted some okra but we were out - since I didn't want to hear why you let us run out of okra, I found some broccoli from one of the meals and fried it.  It was green - she can't really see that well so I served it to her.  She didn't know the difference and gave me thumbs up.  I know you're probably saying - shame on me but hey, can't blame me for trying to please an 85-year-old lady now can ya? She was happy but when she finished eating - she asked if I did anything different, the okra tasted differed but she like it and to me, that's all that matters. 

🤗 You're a loving daughter🤗
post #6648 of 6805

I did a Keller style roast chicken and stuffed the cavity with parsley and Keller style preserved lemon slices.  The outside got a healthy dose of salt, pepper and thyme.  While it was roasting my wife picked up a pint of brown ride from the Chinese place in town.  Holland pepper, scallion, tomato, garlic, steamed broccoli and a sauce I made.  I chilled the rice in the freezer and when the chicken came out of the oven I heated up the wok and did the chow with coconut oil.  Really tasty meal and leftovers to boot - woo hoo!!

 

post #6649 of 6805


What is blueberry demi and is it something to put on the tenderloin?

post #6650 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidediva View Post
 


What is blueberry demi and is it something to put on the tenderloin?

 

This would be a little easier to answer if we knew what it is in reference to...? I scrolled back a couple of pages and didn't see anything pertaining to blueberry demi, but to wing it a bit...demi refers to demi glace which is a rich brown sauce in classical French cuisine. Depending upon the tenderloin used, for instances a pork tenderloin, blueberries could be incorporated into the sauce with probably favorable results.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #6651 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 

This would be a little easier to answer if we knew what it is in reference to...? 

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner#post_380970

post #6652 of 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlgcchef View Post
 

Pan seared Pork tenderloin with a blueberry demi, roasted fingerlings and baby carrots.  A bottle of Alpine Beer co. Duet to wash it all down.

 


What is blueberry demi and did you place it on the tenderloin?

post #6653 of 6805


Sorry still learning how to use this site. This was on What did you have for dinner by  tlgcchef. Thanks for your patience :)

post #6654 of 6805
Cheflayne answered your question above.
post #6655 of 6805

" blueberry demi" Its a sauce!

 

Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935) was the first great star of modern cooking. Acknowledged during his lifetime as the greatest chef in the world - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/escoffier-9781852855260/#sthash.HmMNeJGv.dpuf

 

The Escoffier cookbook is also an authority on Sauces, which is the signature of French cookery. The “Saucier”, is described in Ferdinand Point's Ma Gastronomie as “the Picasso of the kitchen.”

 

The Demi-glaze is fundamental to rich sauces especially for meat or fowl. This reduction usually starts with veal stock and is often combined with wine, port, cognac, and any number of vegetables and even fruit to enhance the richness and diversity of flavors. The most famous of the demi-glaze based sauce is Robert Sauce derived from the classic French Espagnole sauce.

post #6656 of 6805

Just finished making ganache cake for tomorrow's party.
post #6657 of 6805
Beautiful!
post #6658 of 6805
Didn't have it in any of us to cook so out to the local pizza joint.




However, the cheese fairy came calling today a boy was he a welcome guest.


post #6659 of 6805

I tried cooking a steak but ended up burning it. instead i ate some peanuts and decided to call it a useless soulless day :(

post #6660 of 6805

Only tolerate the abstinence so long, then I long for something worth eating. I made four apricot-pineapple empanadas baked until golden brown with a little less sugar and more lemon juice  to re-enforce the twang of the pineapple. I am bad but they were cross-eye good.

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