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What did you have for dinner? - Page 227

post #6781 of 6810

Brontosaurus Ribs.

Smoked (choice) beef short ribs and an ice cold beer after a long, hard weekend in the kitchen.

 

post #6782 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by BloodyMary View Post
 

The midnight special. Shrimp tacos.

Tiger shrimp, Lightly breaded and deep fried. Old Bay seasoning. Flour tortilla. Mixed greens. Red onion and lemon...

 

.


Looks so appealing- Nice Job!

post #6783 of 6810

Twice Cooked Garlic Pork

 

Uses leftover roast Boston Butt. Mushroom soy, marin, crushed red pepper, white pepper, fermented black beans, mince ginger. Use Napa cabbage center whites, vidalia onion, scallions, red, yellow, orange Baby bells. Serve over steamed Jasmine Rice. Very tasty and colorfull.

post #6784 of 6810

Thank you, Steve.

post #6785 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

farm had chives with the blossoms had to buy.  didn't really have time to buy other ingredients yet..  threw together some chive pancakes

 

 

 

That looks lovely! 

post #6786 of 6810

My buddy has joined a competition BBQ team and they do real well on ribs, pulled pork, and chicken but have been struggling with brisket. So he is endeavoring to perfect that. He cooked a brisket Friday night and I had bought one to do Saturday. This was my first time ever smoking a brisket. For the most part I followed Franklins BBQ method and watched his video on trimming it. Rub was a simple equal portion of ground pepper, mustard seed, salt, and garlic powder.

 

I was happy with several aspects but I can attest to how difficult it is to get a perfect result. I probably pulled mine a little too early because the flat was not to the level of tenderness that it needed to be. I also made a mistake in trimming on the point and removed a layer of fat that I shouldn't have. Otherwise the point and the burnt ends were just about perfect.

 

 

post #6787 of 6810

saturday evening party.  slow cooked pork shoulder, boiled red potatoes, baked beans, and coleslaw.

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #6788 of 6810

Rainy day here so I decided to make some comfort food. Chicken and dumplings. My grocer makes good rotisserie chickens that can be pulled easily so I use those. Benefit of making this is I get to use the carcass and vege trimmings for stock!

 

 

post #6789 of 6810
Father's Day gumbo. Roasted chicken thigh meat, smoked sausage and shrimp.




post #6790 of 6810
Tonight pan fried extra small Local Willipa Bay oysters.
post #6791 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

My buddy has joined a competition BBQ team and they do real well on ribs, pulled pork, and chicken but have been struggling with brisket. So he is endeavoring to perfect that. He cooked a brisket Friday night and I had bought one to do Saturday. This was my first time ever smoking a brisket. For the most part I followed Franklins BBQ method and watched his video on trimming it. Rub was a simple equal portion of ground pepper, mustard seed, salt, and garlic powder.

 

I was happy with several aspects but I can attest to how difficult it is to get a perfect result. 

 

 

 

 

 

Been a few years since I've done a brisket.  They are less forgiving than pork shoulder, but SO GOOD when done well.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6792 of 6810
Brisket, apple slaw & a baked potato.
post #6793 of 6810

3" thick prime rib steak.  3 hrs. @ 140F in a water bath seasoned with smoked salt, pepper, a glug of evoo, a couple of smashed garlic cloves and a spring of rosemary.  I let it rest in the bag then seared it on the grill - delicious.

 

 

post #6794 of 6810

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

3" thick prime rib steak.  3 hrs. @ 140F in a water bath seasoned with smoked salt, pepper, a glug of evoo, a couple of smashed garlic cloves and a spring of rosemary.  I let it rest in the bag then seared it on the grill - delicious.

 

 

 

That is ABSOLUTELY STUNNING. It reminds me of summer barbecues in France, where the ubiquitous "cote de boeuf" is king amongst duck magrets, lamb shoulders, merguez and chipolatas. Looks to me like you got the temperature JUST RIGHT. :lips:

post #6795 of 6810
Turkey bog using the carcass of last week's smoked turkey. The smoke flavor was a nice addition.
post #6796 of 6810

Had dinner at a fast food place tonight.  First time visiting a Pei Wei ( pee wee? ) chain location, was pleasantly surprised. They were hyping a new "Spicy Polynesian Poke Bowl" so I ordered one.  I liked it. I liked it a lot more than I though I would.  Meant to do a poke for the recent fish challenge, didn't work out, but I enjoyed eating what I had tonight.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6797 of 6810


Sauteed pork chops with mashed potatoes and steamed corn
post #6798 of 6810

In my quest to master Chinese cuisine, I made the family Sizzling Rice Soup. Like any soup worth its salt, the stock has to be impeccable. To that end, the chicken stock cooked low and slow for 24 hours, then we added several cloves of garlic, a cut up Vidalia onion, 2 carrots, 2 ribs of celery, a small bit of peeled ginger and a bunch of scallions. After three more hours, we triple strained, cooled, and skimmed all the fat.

 

My ingredients were similar to anyone's recipe for this soup except I used cremini mushrooms. The hard part was trying to figure out the “sizzling rice” part. I had read conflicting approaches. Having spent the time getting the stock right, I was going to have to experiment with the rice part.

 

Turns out, that I had poor results trying to fry day old rice. It was not getting crisp enough. It had too much water. I formed 1/4 thick layer of the rice on parchment paper and stamped out circles with an inverted rice bowl. These were then dried in 300 F convection oven for an hour until dry. Once dry, the cakes fry in very hot oil (375 F) for 10 seconds a side. [This rice was jasmine.]

 

post #6799 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve TPHC View Post
 

In my quest to master Chinese cuisine

 

 

 

Such a simple concept, but ...

 

I'm surprised that China, as well as Spain, Africa, Eastern Europe, has not been the basis of a locale based challenge.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6800 of 6810
Quote:
 I'm surprised that China, as well as Spain, Africa, Eastern Europe, has not been the basis of a locale based challenge.

We had Swedish cuisine a couple of months ago... But yes, I thought about doing Asian for my last challenge because I cook it a lot, but realized that many people don't have access to the ingredients where they live.  Even where I live, we have trouble finding keffir lime leaves for Thai, so I planted my own little tree.

post #6801 of 6810
I'm so isolated that I can hardly buy soy sauce.....no joke
post #6802 of 6810

If you have internet you have access to those ingredients, at least for the most part (in the USA). 

 

Amazon delivers all sorts of grocery products. 

post #6803 of 6810
I can get basics, it's just a 90 mile round trip to go to a real grocery store. Even there the selection is somewhat generic. Have to drive to Portland to go to any ethnic store, four hour round trip. Have to plan ahead for anything besides meat and taters.
post #6804 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

I can get basics, it's just a 90 mile round trip to go to a real grocery store. Even there the selection is somewhat generic. Have to drive to Portland to go to any ethnic store, four hour round trip. Have to plan ahead for anything besides meat and taters.

 

I'm telling ya, amazon...could change your life. I assume you get USPS where you live?

post #6805 of 6810

I'll  think twice before buying spices on amazon again.

post #6806 of 6810

At the risk of hijacking the thread, you need more than packaged spices/sauces. Chinese veg are different than Western veg. Chinese celery & leeks aren't like western versions. Then the whole range of choy, bitter melon, herbs like shiso, mushrooms, lotus root, fresh bamboo shoot.Our local Indian stores have different squashes/bitter melons/fruits that aren't like those in your average Western store. Then there's the 'wok' difference, with the high heat.

 

I think it would be a challenge indeed to do 'authentic' regional dishes, though one can do dishes that are as true as possible, under the circumstances.  Not just Asian, either -- many other cuisines would be equally challenging. Especially if you're never tasted the authentic version, which was the case for me in the Swedish challenge.

 

Back to 'What did you have for dinner!!"

post #6807 of 6810

Loaded baked potato (butter, smoked gouda, pork belly, creme fraiche and spring onions)

with tender, smoked pork loin and a Guiness beer.

 

post #6808 of 6810
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Had dinner at a fast food place tonight.  First time visiting a Pei Wei ( pee wee? ) chain location, was pleasantly surprised. They were hyping a new "Spicy Polynesian Poke Bowl" so I ordered one.  I liked it. I liked it a lot more than I though I would.  Meant to do a poke for the recent fish challenge, didn't work out, but I enjoyed eating what I had tonight.

 

mjb.

 

I love the mongolian beef bowl (flank steak option). I eat it a few times a month and also tend to take 200 fortune cookies on my way out. 

 

Make sure you create an account and give them your phone number (so they can apply the order to your account). Every 1,000 points = a free meal (any size). 

post #6809 of 6810

As you can see here, I'm pretty close to a free meal. Haha. 2 dang points. 

 

post #6810 of 6810

I might as well post my oven baked babies. 250 - 260 for 7 hours. (my own dry rub). No BBQ where I live. Fantastic flavor, though. 

 

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