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What did you have for dinner? - Page 24

post #691 of 4255

Chef Ed,

 

Very interesting, I have never heard of that.

 

In the 'Old country' , they used alot of different things in their soup, maybe even things we don't have here today. But I can see it being used for sure.

Cooking it down with potatoes will give it the added body. Some used different spices.

Blended down and served in mini cups & saucers with creme fraiche for big events. I have also made it with gelatin.

Served hot or cold like a vichyssoise, you can dress it up or dress it down, it just tastes great.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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post #692 of 4255

Duck would certainly be worth a try, Ed! I'll do that next time. 

 

The original Borscht, though, is probably completely lost in history. I did in fact learn my recipe from the grandma of a Russian friend, and she used beef. It's pretty much the recipe petals posted, without the celery, though. From what I heard, you could probably start a religious war between Russian and Ukrainian Borscht, though....

 

GM

post #693 of 4255

Tonight - Poached tri-tip Munich style (aka Tafelspitz)

 

 

700

post #694 of 4255

GM: Nice plating.  Apple/horsheradish with that ? I believe that its all in the broth. When making Tafelspitz, can other beef parts be used or is it strickly the tri-tip ?

 

Petals.

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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post #695 of 4255

Just plain horseradish for me. At least here in Munich, tri-tip is the one and only traditional option. The Austrians, however, do have some other options. They must have the most complex system of cuts for beef. I leave it to an Austrian butcher to explain and translate Bürgermeisterstück, Fledermaus or Schwarzes Scherzl...

 

Generally, you want a cut surrounded by fat, but with no significant intramuscular fat and not too much collagen. And indeed, it is all in the broth. I simmered it in some clear oxtail broth I had left in the freezer, enriched with some onions, carrots, button mushrooms for a little umami boost, laurel, juniper berries.

 

GM

post #696 of 4255

Not dinner per se, but I had @ 5lbs of nice Hormel ham left over from the wedding.  I cut it up for the grinder then made a chipotle mayonnaise and added sweet jalapeno relish and stone ground mustard.  What a tasty spread for sandwiches, crackers, etc. it is.  Not too spicy up front, but it grows on you.
 

post #697 of 4255

Homemade Won Ton. Tournedos Villeroi with a big salad. Strawberries with Chantilly.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #698 of 4255

Quail & Couscous.

 

 

 

700 Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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post #699 of 4255

gobi aloo egg salad

paneer tikka masala

chloe palak

naan

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #700 of 4255
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

Quail & Couscous.

 

 

 

700 Petals.

Oh yes, I have a few partridge in the freezer, the above looks ideal for a change. Recipe please.

post #701 of 4255

Hi Kippers,

 

There is nothing complicated about this dish as I am sure you might have guessed. The  quail were seasoned with salt, pepper and a couple of pinches of brown sugar, placed in a pan of oil and butter. seared, then tossed in a 400F oven for 10 minutes. Took them out, deglazed the pan with 1 cup of stock, juice of 2 oranges, lots of zest, tablespoon of roux, splash of port, pinch of cayenne. Put quail back in pan and spooned the sauce over them.

 

Couscous (med size) chicken stock, 1/3 cup of chopped parsely, 1/3 c mint, 1/3 c coriander, orange zest, 1 cup fried onions -some garlic added,cranberries, crushed pistachio, roasted ground cumin, salt, pepper, at the end I drizzled some olive oil to give the couscous some body.

 

I made this for my parents the other night. I buy my poultry from a farm and happened to get the quail for .70 cents each, cleaned but not de-boned. It happens to be one of my fav's.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #702 of 4255

Beautiful as always.

 

Here, I made a somewhat eclectic and definitely non-purist black bean chili with slowly braised brisket, garnished with quick pickled onions and jalapenos and, of course, cheddar.

 

 

700

post #703 of 4255

GM: That looks soooo good. There are alot of comfort foods out there, this is one of them. On a cold day like today, I would love a bowl of that right now.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #704 of 4255

That was the whole reason for making the dish, petals. Cold and grey with a freezing drizzle here. Dr. GeneMachine prescribes some chili! It got even better today - and the short pickles have gained even more overnight. A glass of a nice local Merlot, or three, and one can almost forget about the dreary weather :)

post #705 of 4255
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

GM: That looks soooo good. There are alot of comfort foods out there, this is one of them. On a cold day like today, I would love a bowl of that right now.

 

Petals.


Me too. Looks great

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #706 of 4255
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

Hi Kippers,

 

There is nothing complicated about this dish as I am sure you might have guessed. The  quail were seasoned with salt, pepper and a couple of pinches of brown sugar, placed in a pan of oil and butter. seared, then tossed in a 400F oven for 10 minutes. Took them out, deglazed the pan with 1 cup of stock, juice of 2 oranges, lots of zest, tablespoon of roux, splash of port, pinch of cayenne. Put quail back in pan and spooned the sauce over them.

 

Couscous (med size) chicken stock, 1/3 cup of chopped parsely, 1/3 c mint, 1/3 c coriander, orange zest, 1 cup fried onions -some garlic added,cranberries, crushed pistachio, roasted ground cumin, salt, pepper, at the end I drizzled some olive oil to give the couscous some body.

 

I made this for my parents the other night. I buy my poultry from a farm and happened to get the quail for .70 cents each, cleaned but not de-boned. It happens to be one of my fav's.

 

Petals.

Thank you, I will give it a bash but I will buy some quail. 

post #707 of 4255

we had skampi buzara last night because its quick.700

post #708 of 4255

My kind of fast food, kippers!

post #709 of 4255

I agree GM, the meat on those is so sweet, must have been an amazing sauce for dipping, thanks for sharing that Kippers.

 

700 Here are some salmon cakes and apple slaw.

 

700 Cod chowder.


Edited by petalsandcoco - 11/8/12 at 6:04am

Petals
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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Wine and Cheese
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post #710 of 4255

Nice dishes everywhere. Autumm there, spring here. I thought i could golf today but it's impossible with 38°C (shadow). So a quick snack for lunch: green asparagus (sauté on the bacon fat) with fried bacon and some parmessan on top. Talk about umami!

 

 

.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #711 of 4255

Last night we had Croatian breakfast for dinner, Burek with salad.

 

700

post #712 of 4255

Petals!!

 You do some of the nicest plating on this site  Gene machine is also a different style but very nice.. When I look at your presentations it reminds me of when I was in France many, many years ago. Classical and most of all NEAT.& CLEAN. 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #713 of 4255

@Chefedb Thanks Chef!

 

@Petals We seem to have the same concept of comfort foods for weather like this. I made some cod chowder myself last week. After reading Mark Kurlansky's "Cod: A biography of the fish that changed the world", I simply had to. One question, though - I just reviewed this thread and I came back to your Borscht. Could you quickly explain how you did the plating of the wrapped-up sour cream in your presentation? I have to shamelessly steal that technique ;)

 

@ordo Don't tease me! I am about to slip into my winter depression! Can't wait for the local asparagus season to arrive again. Seriously looks great.

 

Last dinner was roast beef with butternut squash and cucumbers - can't upload the pics, since I didn't cook it at home. The squash/cuke combination works pretty well, though. Nice texture difference between the mealy squash and crunchy cucumber.

 

Cheers, GM

post #714 of 4255

Really not sure why, but here in the middle of the desert in Fall (?) we had Asparagus in two different markets @ $1.88/lb last week.  Got two huge bunches, gave one to my Mother and then made this the other night.  I thought that this was a spring-time veg, but mine is not the question why, mine is to make good food!

Chinese-American influenced Chicken Asparagus,

rather than Beef Broccoli.  Most yummy over steamed white rice

(gots to have me my two scoops rice!)

 

1000

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #715 of 4255

That is a good price Kgirl. What kind of rice do you use for your dishes ? Nothing beats asparagus cooked al dente.

 

@ GM: It sounds like a good read. For sour cream holder *crazy idea maybe* I took 3 strips of thin bacon and tightly wrapped it around a metal ring (always put aluminum paper around the metal ring so that it does not cook to the ring, you want  it to slide off easily ). Taking end piece of bacon, I seared that part right away and then gently turned and cooked the bacon . Once that was done , I slipped it off and placed it in a preheated oven so that the interior would cook. When that was done , I placed it  on a paper towel, let it come to room temp and then placed it on the soup mixture and scooped the sour cream in. Basically speaking they are bacon rings.

I finished making a terrine of hamhocks today, I will post the video tormorrow of where I took the recipe from (followed it to a "T") and I will post a pic. One more thing off my to do list. :)

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #716 of 4255

"When that was done" .....I am sounding redundant. *my bad*, sorry.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #717 of 4255
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

That is a good price Kgirl. What kind of rice do you use for your dishes ? Nothing beats asparagus cooked al dente.

 

 

Petals.

 

My jaw just about hit the green grocer's floor when I saw gorgeous pencil thin asparagus in November for that price.  Normally, it's pushing $4 USD per pound or more.  They were so sweet and yummy, I blanched them for 30 seconds and then shocked them to hold until the rest of the dish was put together,  PREFECT crisp-tender.

As to the rice that I use, it's calrose cooked in my faithful Panasonic 3cuper. 

I use the method suggested by Ming Tsai to cook it. 

 

700

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #718 of 4255

700

I cooked today this dish - Roasted chicken legs with chestnut filling, dill gnocchi, carrot in sweet paprika sauce

post #719 of 4255

to PETALSANDCOCO:

 

Really nice pics...salmon cakes with sweet and sour apple salad combo is perfect and cod chowder should be delicious as well.
 

post #720 of 4255

Last week, or maybe the week before the Sprouts Markets here in Salt Lake had asparagus for $1.29 a pound.  Needless to say I bought a pound or two or three.

 

Yum.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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