or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Pierogi...To fry or not fry...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pierogi...To fry or not fry...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

At work the other day I made my own Pierogi dough and all.

I made 3 kinds, Sauerkraut, Potato and Cheddar, and Sauerkraut with shredded pot roast mixed.

After blanching them, I presented them by cooking them gently in some stock and butter, and simply with chopped parsley on top.

I was told that the only true way to enjoy them would be to fry them until they are crispy brown all over.

 

I had never enjoyed them that way, as by the time I got to eating them they were rubbery and awful.

I have researched some as well as spoken to some die-hard Pierogi lovers and found that the brown crispy thing is equally divided with simply steamed or heated in the manner I described above.

 

Anyone who enjoys Jewish Kreplach uses them as a condiment in soup, but I suppose they could be fried in chicken shmaltz until brown and crispy as well.

Wontons are fried in most cases or steamed as in pot stickers or Dim Sum.

 

I am curious as to what other people, who enjoy these wonderful morsels, do....

post #2 of 19

ChefRoss ... I really really so very much want to tell you what to do, the correct answer ... you know ... my opinion. We are however adults, and professionals, that should need to realize that there are many differences in customs and preferences. Pierogi are a food product that can truly be "Burger Kinged", so-to-speak; people can "have them their way". Pierogi are to me, their own food group. I've eaten as many pierogi as any other food item. The way I like them best; the only I will cook or serve them; the absolute proper way for pierogi to be made is ... lightly boiled then pan-fried brown in butter. Any other way is blasphemous. 

 

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for that, and I probably would enjoy them that way if they came to the plate right from the pan, but, unfortunately I have never had that delightful experience until yesterday. It was wonderful and now I can't get enough of them that way. Thanks

post #4 of 19

Pierogi. When I visit my sister in Fall River Ma. It's alway Piorei time she married into a Polish family and 1/2 the town is Polish the other 1/2 Portugese. I went to the basement of the local church and there were all the town woman making them for the annual fair.  They make potato and onion only.1000s of them . They serve by simply sauteing in oil or butter till lightly browned then drve with sour cream on side. I make them home quite often with a Sauce Smitane. My wife and I love them.. Deep fried they are good as an hor d ourve.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 19

Pan fried in brown butter or poached and tossed with butter and fresh chives...YUM!

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #6 of 19

Summertime: Boiled and tossed with a bit of butter. Sour cream on the side

 

Winter:  Tossed into a pan of onions that have been caramelized with a lot of bacon, and sweated a bit.

 

HEY!! I never said I was an expert....................

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #7 of 19

That is exactly how I serve them. On rare occasion with kielbasa and sauerkraut and a good mustard & black bread.

 

Petals.

 

ChefRoss : fried in chicken shmaltz, now that sounds interesting.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply
post #8 of 19

In Russia, fried pierogi are usually considered as a some kind of "low-end" pierogi. And there is an opinion that a true art of making pierogi is about baking, but not frying. :)

 

 

 

post #9 of 19

Low end ?  I don't know about that. My husband is Polish and pierogi is like a staple....

 

There are no wrong or right ways of serving up a pierogi, if it made right and cooked to the delight of your own palate , how can it be wrong ?

 

Which brings me to , kirniki.....although you can't beat potato.

 

I never baked a pierogi in my life. wouldn't that dry it out ?

 

Petals.

 

ps. pierogi's into a sweet dish can be very nice.

 

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply
post #10 of 19

Baked Pierogi ? This has to look like an Empinada and be kind of hard crust.  When I was in Soviet Union ,I never saw Pierogi anywhere, just Shiska on skewers.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 19

Quote:

My husband is Polish and pierogi is like a staple....

 

There are no wrong or right ways of serving up a pierogi, if it made right and cooked to the delight of your own palate , how can it be wrong ?


Actualy, I don't want to say that there is something wrong about Polish pierogi. Not at all.

 

I'm just curious how it happened that a single slavic word "pierogi" is being used to name completely different dishes. :)

 

There is a dish very similar to what Chefros is talking about in Ukraine. It's called "varenniki" and it's always poached and rarely fried. It's popular in Russia as well, but usually never fried.

 

post #12 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Baked Pierogi ? This has to look like an Empinada and be kind of hard crust.  When I was in Soviet Union ,I never saw Pierogi anywhere, just Shiska on skewers.


 

Lucky you. :) Definetely, you was in some other Soviet Union. Not the one that I used to live in and that I travelled through from Irkutsk to Kiev and from Samarkand to Leningrad. :)

 

I make this conclusion because I've never seen no one who put cone of pine tree ("shishka") on skewers. :)

post #13 of 19

Sorry, but this is what they called it, and our intourist guide aso called it that. Was in Kiev, Leningrad, Odessa,Minx,Moscow etc. Never saw it. When I was in russia, it was under communist rule, could be different now, I don;t know. I also remember in one restaurant getting a few slices of fresh pineapple for dessert was a  great thing?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by romanas View Post

Quote:


Actualy, I don't want to say that there is something wrong about Polish pierogi. Not at all.

 

I'm just curious how it happened that a single slavic word "pierogi" is being used to name completely different dishes. :)

 

There is a dish very similar to what Chefros is talking about in Ukraine. It's called "varenniki" and it's always poached and rarely fried. It's popular in Russia as well, but usually never fried.

 

I have some Canadian friends with Ukrainian ancestry and they make Pierogi but they pronounce them as "Pead-a-hay." 
 

 

post #15 of 19

My personal preference is for them to be fried, but then again I almost always opt for fried, if given the choice, over steamed when it comes to most foods, even if it isn't necessarily authentic.  I have a number of friends who come from Eastern European roots and I would say that they are pretty well divided about how pierogis are traditionally made.

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #16 of 19

This is how I know them to be called to  : "Pead-a-hay." ....   my mother-in-law  says : "pye" and not "pe" and the "r" is rolled so fast  with  the end sounding  just like "hay".

 

I like to blanch my pierogi before freezing.

 

Blanch,  let them cool, put on tray and freeze, remove &  toss in bag and put back in freezer. They keep their shape and it cuts the cooking time for future use.

 

Petals.


 

 

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply
post #17 of 19

The ones that come frozen today regadless of brand are almost all blanched, or as they call it " Instant" you bring water to a boil, put them in and when they float(a few minutes ) take out and drain. They are not all that bad.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

I have some Canadian friends with Ukrainian ancestry and they make Pierogi but they pronounce them as "Pead-a-hay." 
 

 


Right. I bet your friends are from western part of Ukraine. They have very nice and soft pronunciation, so common "ro" sometimes sounds like "da" or "ta" and "gi" ("ги" in cyrillic) sounds like "hay".

post #19 of 19


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Sorry, but this is what they called it, and our intourist guide aso called it that. 


No, they didn't. Trust me, this is absolute linguistic nonsense. And it was always so, because word "shishka" exists for centuries and it always meant "cone of pine tree". 

 

Actually, as you know, Russian pronunciation is very different from English or American and sometimes it's very difficult for foreigners to catch and repeat exact phrase. So, I think this is the reason. As I already said in another topic, most probably they said "shashlik".

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

When I was in russia, it was under communist rule, could be different now, I don;t know. I also remember in one restaurant getting a few slices of fresh pineapple for dessert was a  great thing?

 

I think that you should not have said "sorry". Actually, I am very sorry for these folks from Intourist that left you with really strange impression about Russian cuisine. If you'll decide to visit Moscow once again, please drop me a message and I'll try to do my best to improve your impression that is absolutely disasterous in my opinion.

 

Well, but let's return to pierogi. If you want, I can provide written references from any period since 18th century that pierogi were baked. :)

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Pierogi...To fry or not fry...