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Baking vs. (oven) Roasting?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I almost finished a similar post not long ago, hit the enter key a couple of times by accident and then 'lost' the page. I do not see the post so I've again posted the message. If there is a similar post here that I've not found, I apologize.

 

I do not see any difference in recipe temperature or rack location for recipes that call for baked vs. roasted.

 

For example, I’m ‘roasting’ brussel sprouts rolled in olive oil and balsamic vinegar. I place the rack in the center (since the recipe doesn’t stipulate a location), a temperature of 375, cut fact down for 15 minutes then over for 10. The recipe calls this roasting (and they are darn good!). Yet there are similar recipes with temperatures of 400 and 500 and they too say they’re roasting.

 

Frankly, I don’t see why I couldn’t say I’m baking the sprouts just as well (although roasting sounds like it’ll taste better <g>).

 

Mark

post #2 of 18

hi mark,

yes, just the word roasted invokes a more pleasurable response...like caramelized onions do.  the difference to me is that when i roast i do so at a higher temperature(400+) and usually it involves some sort of oil or fat as i want what i am roasting to be browned..so vegetables or whole roasted chicken will get rubbed or drizzled with olive oil. on the other hand if i am baking bread, cookies or cakes i usually doing so at a lower temp(350) and no oil. then again, pies, especially fruit pies are baked at higher temps 375-400 so maybe it's just the added oil that is the difference...roasted pie just doesn't sound right though!....

joey

as an afterthought, maybe 375 is the minimum temperature that can be called roasting and 400-500 is the higher end. hmmm


Edited by durangojo - 3/9/12 at 1:50pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks Joey--makes sense.

 

So one last question on this thing. I use good evo to mix the sprouts in the bowl with the oil and stuff and I was using Pam olive oil spray for foil lined pan since it worked so well (releasing cooked foods). Then I had pangs of guilt and yesterday squirted the evo on a folded paper towel and rubbed the foil thinking that the junky olive oil spray would screw up the good oil flavor.

 

A bunch of the sprouts still stuck to the foil (whereas none would stick when I sprayed the foil) which was no big deal since I maybe lost 1/8 of the outer leaves. But the question does remain. Does it make a difference whether you use the good or the not so good for the foil?

 

Mark

post #4 of 18

i don't use pam or any spray oil actually. not for any other reason than i just don't. i only use it at the restaurant to spray the grill down before dinner service. i think your sticking problem is that you didn't use enough oil....i don't just toss the vegetables with oil... i drizzle a healthy pour  over them as well...not swimming but enough to see and pool a bit.. i also don't use bad(inferior) olive oil...i just use evoo for everything roasted because that is what i have, and i generally use parchment paper if it's going in the oven...foil i save for the grill packets......it's a good thing you are conscientiuos enough to have guilt pangs, but not to worry...i don't think in the big picture it really makes that much of a difference. the spray stuff is pricey and for the amount of oil that i use, it would take a whole can...so why bother?

joey


Edited by durangojo - 3/9/12 at 4:42pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #5 of 18

If you're interested in spraying olive oil they do sell nifty little spray cans at BB&B.  You put the olive oil in and then pump it to build up the pressure and then it sprays like an aerosol can.  They're fantastic and you never have to use fake oils.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Wow! Thanks for the tip. Just to be sure--Your BBB is the same Bed Bath and Beyond...

post #7 of 18

Baking vs. Roasting could be a lot like stock vs. broth discussions.  No real, definitive answer to cover all situations.

 

I myself tend towards "baking" as involving breads, casseroles, pasta dishes like lasagna, pies and such.  "Roasting" is for meats, usually, but not always.  The other day I did some sweet potato roasties - bite sized chunks, well oiled, hot oven.  Quite different than a baked potato.  Roasting sometimes infers a hotter oven, but you bake pizza at X degrees, not roast, and the hotter the X the better the pizza.  Now what's this I hear about broasted chicken?

 

 

mjb.

 

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #8 of 18

No....

 

Baking is always done with dry heat and no fat whatsoever. (Dry heat evaporates water in doughs, promotes "lift" in baked goods, provides a crispy crust, etc)

 

Roasting is always done with some kind of a fat and  with moist heat (or the meat would be dry as a fart)

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 18

Another comment about roasting vs. baking...is that baking sometimes necessitates covering the food to be cooked while in roasting the item is always un-covered.

post #10 of 18

 

 

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, 
No fat, dry heat, covered by the shell, 
Yuletide carols being sung by a choir, 
And folks dressed up like Eskimos.

 

huge liberties taken and apologies to Torme, Wells, and Colefatherxmas.jpg

 

comments below added after original posting

 

the line "No fat, dry heat, covered by the shell"

 

is in reality "Jack Frost nipping on your nose"

 

it was an attempt at levity

 

my apologies to the offended

 

"What a strange world this would be if we all had the same sense of humor." Bern Williams

 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg2 View Post

Wow! Thanks for the tip. Just to be sure--Your BBB is the same Bed Bath and Beyond...




thumb.gif

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 18
Quote:
Roasting is always done with some kind of a fat and with moist heat (or the meat would be dry as a fart)

Actually roasting is a dry heat method. The addition of moisture to a roast would would put it into the category of a braise. I haven't heard a real technical breakdown on the difference between roasting and baking, but tend to agree with three general consensus that baking mostly involves breads, pastries, and no fat. Whereas roasting will include some fat and is used more for meats and savory applications. I will to with whatever sounds the best. Roasted Brussel sprouts sounds right so it must be a roast. Roasted Apple pie does not, that one is baked.

Perhaps the correct answer is in the difference between a roasted and baked potato.

Side bar for those who may not know... The use of fat in cooking is considered a dry heat method. Sautee, fry, deep fry, roast, all dry heat methods.
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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post #13 of 18

cheflayne,

i thought it funny and sweet! so there.....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #14 of 18

I guess you told me!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #15 of 18

The terms are old and usage refers back to old techniques. Roasting was generally a live fire cooking technique, spitted and turning in front of the fire or over coals.

 

Baking was generally an enclosed technique, buried in the ashes, in a dutch oven, or inside a brick oven.

 

With the rise of equipment and infrastructure, you could use the one tool for multiple "techniques"  though you used it the same way without regard to the technique you did.

 

In modern parlance, I think the difference between roasting and baking breaks down along the use of grains. breads, pies, cakes are baked because you are cooking grain products-- all things that were traditionally cooked with enclosed heat. Where you run into some possible confusion is with things like baked frried chicken. You're using a baking technique to set the crust on the meat instead of frying, so it's still about the grain.

 

For much of history, individuals didn't have their own ovens but used a common oven in the town square where the town gathered to bake their bread all together all at once (Greece). It didn't make sense for each to have their own oven for baking. Or they patronized the business that had the oven. This is only recently changing even now in countries like India and China. Most home "baked" goods were steamed in China. The bakery was a specialty business.

 

It's from these old ovens and dutch ovens where all the falling oven techniques developed. Popovers, dutch babies and so on. These are put in a HOT oven and the temp reduced over time.

 

This replicates how the old ovens would be fired up, but cool over the baking time as fuel was not replenished.

 

An example of low tech roasting http://www.williamrubel.com/a-string-roasted-turkey/

And a discussion of fired bread ovens http://www.williamrubel.com/bread-oven-basics/ 

 

Scroll down, he has a big image that occupies most of the screen.

post #16 of 18

I suppose then the true difference could be distinguished between a baked potato and a roasted potato?

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparkie View Post

Quote:
Roasting is always done with some kind of a fat and with moist heat (or the meat would be dry as a fart)
Actually roasting is a dry heat method. The addition of moisture to a roast would would put it into the category of a braise. I haven't heard a real technical breakdown on the difference between roasting and baking, but tend to agree with three general consensus that baking mostly involves breads, pastries, and no fat. Whereas roasting will include some fat and is used more for meats and savory applications. I will to with whatever sounds the best. Roasted Brussel sprouts sounds right so it must be a roast. Roasted Apple pie does not, that one is baked.
Perhaps the correct answer is in the difference between a roasted and baked potato.
Side bar for those who may not know... The use of fat in cooking is considered a dry heat method. Sautee, fry, deep fry, roast, all dry heat methods.

Yeah baking and roasting are dry heat, but I guess I should have been more specific.

 

When baking, say puff pastry items, I need dry heat, so I will leave the oven vents open. If my oven doesn't have vents, I'll stick a spoon in the door to leave it open a crack, as I want to drive off as much moisture as possible that the dough gives off when baking.  Those who are foolish enough to roast a prime rip in a cheap-o convection oven will only do it once, you want to retain as much moisture in the oven as possible or you'll have jerky and significant weight loss.

 


 

 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #18 of 18
Yes, now I understand what you are saying. I have made some roasts with a pan of water underneath to prevent drying out. In this case I do believe it is still a dry technique, not a braise. Thanks for the clarity.

Phatch, nice history lesson. I think that really does a good job of getting to the heart of the matter. It's posts like that, that really keep me coming back to this forum!
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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