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Wrapping it up....

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
During my career in professional kitchens I went through various phases of learning such as working with Asian products, getting into French cuisine etc. One of my favorite phases was when I started wrapping various food products I was working with. Some of the more memorable items that were big hits with the clientel were:
  • Monkfish wrapped in smoked bacon
  • Salmon wrapped in potato
  • Chicken wrapped in phyllo
  • Shrimp wrapped in wonton wrappers and fried
  • Mahi Mahi wrapped in bannan leaves.

What are some ideas others have had for wrapping food items.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #2 of 26

Rock and roll, or roll and wrap!!!

Fun idea for a thread Nicko.

The monkfish you used to do is very similar to one I used to do, and still do in the cooler months.

I wrap the lotte with pancetta instead of the smoked bacon, roast it and serve it a top of a simple white bean, tomato, rosemary raguet (sliced on triange)

Just last night I had malipec oysters wrapped with tuna carpaccio with a citrus vinaigrette that was really good.

When Barry Wine was one of the big names in New York city, I used to make his crepe purses tied with a chive bow.

Lamb loin, pistacios and mint wrapped in phyllo.

Tuna maki tempura is a popular Hdo at work.

chic pea and tahini crepe filled with baba ganush, breaded with chic pea flour and fried, a mint and saltina chutney I serve with this.

of course chicken stuffed, wrapped and cooked in 100.000 ways (anything to give chicken some flavor)

heres one I haven't even thought about for over 15 years until now.

When I was working at Le Chambord, we would skin our salmon, and lay the skin scale side down on a piece of saran.
Gently pound the salmon fillet and place in ontop of the skin and lay blanched leeks over that, then pound some stripped bass fillet and lay it over the salmon and leeks and shave black truffle over the bass, then place sered lotte down the center of the whole thing and roll it up in the saran and poach it in a court boullion, slice and serve with beurre blanc...geez that was good :)

You got me thinking now Nicko

:lips:
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
One of my favorites that I haven't done in a long time was salmon topped with a scallop mousse wrapped in blanched cabbage leaves.

You can take the shrimp wrapped in proscuitto and replace it with scallops as well.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #4 of 26
I do boneless chicken breasts wrapped in shredded potato. It's a Pierre Franey recipe. YUM :lips:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #5 of 26
One of my favorites is whole trout stuffed with spinach, ricotta, parmesan (and an egg for binder), and herbs, then wrapped in bacon. Slowly rendered over med. heat until the bacon starts to crisp and finshed in the oven.

Others include:
-basmati rice scented with lemongrass, mango, and basil and wrapped in blanched romaine leaves on which sauteed snapper is placed

-Salmon wrapped in Spring Roll wrappers and pan-fried

-Lightly smoked oysters (housesmoked of course) wrapped in proscuitto and topped with Chipotle-Applesauce

-Baked Pear in Brioche

-Salmon wrapped in puff pastry with spinach and tomato fondue

-Escargot and artichokes wrapped in a phyllo rosette

-
post #6 of 26
Let's see how well the memory works.
grilled salmon wrapped in boiled cabbage leaves with smoked salmon beurre blanc and a poached egg on top (ala Holstein)

Shredded fried potatoes wrapped around a scallop and smoked salmon mousse

and yes the roasted monkfish with smoked bacon and a corn/old bay butter sauce (ala Jean Louis Palladin

Leek confit with scallops in phyllo purses with a black truffle sauternes beurre blanc

wild field green salad in a steamed salmon dome with a smoked salmon (yes again) vinaigrette

creme brulee baked in phyllo

I miss being in a restaurant! :cry: ( but only sometimes!:D )
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #7 of 26
Do you wrap food in paper and bake it in the oven as they do in Nicko's village in Greece???:D

Ortillons in dough so as to announce that you start a vendetta???:D
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have never heard of that one Athenaeus should we discuss this one in the history forum? :)
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #9 of 26
A -- Cooking "en papillote" -- oooh, great way to do fish or the boring boneless chicken breast: tons of flavor, no fat.

"Ortillons in dough ..." you mean those tiny little birds?:eek:

At Le Bernardin, I learned to do a scallop topped with foie gras and julienne black truffle, wrapped in a blanched Savoy cabbage leaf. Then wrapped in plastic wrap and steamed to cook it. Perfectly simple, and simply perfect.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #10 of 26
All these wonderful ideas...

I should have mentioned Brick à l'oeuf as well! :rolleyes:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #11 of 26
I am stuffing a poached granny smith apple with cranberries and raisins and then wrapping it in phyllo dough. We have been selling out all week...
Just Ducky!!!
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Just Ducky!!!
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post #12 of 26
Light rye wrapped in dark rye?
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #13 of 26
Now that's funny KyleW. :lol:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #14 of 26
How about tuna tartar wrapped in tuna carpachio? makes a great idea for canape'.
post #15 of 26
Little morsels of steamed lobster tail wrapped in paper-thin slices of cucumber, with a spicy ginger dipping sauce.

Banana slices wrapped in filo - or wonton wrappers, fried and servied with chocolate fondue.
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"Like water for chocolate"
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__________________
"Like water for chocolate"
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post #16 of 26
HOW DO YOU BAKE CREME BRULEE IN PHYLLO DOUGH? WOULDNT THE DOUGH BURN?
post #17 of 26
Never done it, but I've eaten Creme Brulee in fillo and it was great!
Shroom cigars....duxelle in fillo
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #18 of 26
Duxelle in fillo, Shroom?? Oh you must tell us more!! :p
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Issac,

The creme brullee is baked first and then after it is cooled it is gently removed from it's baking dish and then placed in several sheets of phyllo and baked.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #20 of 26
..so you transfer it when it is semi-set?
How do you avoid damaging it?

(I'm sure surgeons have these discussions too! ;))
post #21 of 26
Generally I use morel or black trumpets with buttons make a duxelle, cool then roll in fillo making a cigar shape.

Years ago I had a brulee with raspberries in fillo cup I'm surprised they transferred the custard.....I knew they pre cooked the napolean version.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #22 of 26
Well, it's not an ancient dish!! The last time I made it was 2 months ago. I mean I know that Americans are fast but two months ago... it's not antiquity!!! :D
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
post #23 of 26
Bonjour! Oh, how lovely! Dear Abby has been terribly busy but is so thrilled to be back. She has been visiting friends in Utah and returned just in time to visit with Dear Jane who was here for the Vagina Monologues in Rapid City. Ooo! What a wonderful production it was! But that, my dears, is another story.

Dear Abby was quite intrigued with mon petit Anneke's question regarding the Crème Brûlée. She, of course, asked her darling Henri.

Chef Henri provided this lovely recipe which, although it does not use phyllo, he stated one utilizes the same technique!


Crème Brûlée in Papaya

Serves 4


1 Vanilla Bean (preferably Tahitian)
4 cups Heavy Cream
8 Egg Yolks
3/4 cup Sugar
3 ripe Hawaiian Papayas
4 tbsp. Brown Sugar
Ripe raspberries, or other berries, for garnish

Slice the vanilla bean in half. Place in a saucepan with the cream. Bring to a boil, then immediately turn the burner off.

Beat the egg yolks and white sugar together in a stainless steel bowl until light in color.

Remove the vanilla bean from the hot cream. Pour the hot cream mixture slowly into the egg mixture, stirring constantly.

Peel, seed and dice 1 papaya and add to the cream mixture.

Place the mixture in an 8 x 8-inch glass baking dish, and bake for 70 minutes in a 300° F oven in a water bath (place dish in larger pan that is 3/4-filled with hot water) until it is almost set. It should be somewhat firm, but will still jiggle in the middle when the dish is shaken, like a custard.

After the mixture is baked, cool, then chill in the refrigerator for two or three hours (or overnight).

When ready to serve, cut the remaining 2 papayas in half and remove the seeds. Spoon the custard mixture into the halved papayas, sprinkle 1 tablespoon of brown sugar on top of each, and broil until the sugar is melted and caramelized. (The caramelized sugar will become a brittle crust when removed from the heat, creating a nice texture contrast with the creamy custard and soft fruit.) Garnish with berries.

Chef Henri also makes a version in which ripe pears are hollowed out and stuffed with the uncooked crème brûlée mixture before baking. It is truly exquisite!

Abby

Dear Abby apologizes. She must have been cranky yesterday.
What my mother believed about cooking is that if you worked hard and prospered, someone else would do it for you.
~Nora Ephron
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What my mother believed about cooking is that if you worked hard and prospered, someone else would do it for you.
~Nora Ephron
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post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
We used to bake them in ramekins and then gently remove the custard making sure they had been chilled at least over night. The were pretty easy to work with and the wrapped fine in the phyllo.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #25 of 26
just to add: we used to tighten the custard a little bit extra, chill,cut squares, coat in any type crumb, freeze. Fry quickly till golden brown serve immediately with sauce. Sounds crazy!! I know, but we sold this to 70% of covers. One place stole it and called it fried creme brulee. Personally, I'm bruleed out.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
Great idea paninni I will have to try that one. We also tightened up the creme brulee before we made it which made it much easier to work with.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
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